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Can you suggest a precise definition for a 'value' within the context of programming without reference to specific encoding techniques or particular languages or architectures?

[Previous question text, for discussion reference: "What is value in programming? How to define this word precisely?"]

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    @Vag, no, I'm saying the meaning depends on context. "What is value" is too vague. Do you mean what is a value? Are we talking about an integer, float, char, string, bool value? Do you mean a variable? Do you mean the value of code in programming? I'm just looking for a precise question and thought that code might help focus your thoughts and therefore your question.
    – Lazarus
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:31
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    I think when programmer use the term "value" they will do so in a specific context, primarily the code they are addressing. That will then collapse this discussion into an architecture, i.e. binary computing, and the definition is then available to us. I do think you are correct that in general/theoretical computing terms 'value' is too nebulous to define beyond a generalisation. You can't have a specific definition in a general context.
    – Lazarus
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:51
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    @Vag: voting to reopen, but please watch your tone. Jul 21, 2010 at 16:07
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    @Vag: You can do a much better job phrasing your question. If you do, I'll bet you'll get a better reception here. You didn't put much effort into it. Jul 21, 2010 at 16:10
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    Perhaps I can suggest a rephrasing: "Can you suggest a precise definition for a 'value' within the context of programming without reference to specific encoding techniques or particular languages or architectures?"
    – Gian
    Jul 21, 2010 at 16:20

6 Answers 6

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I just happened to be glancing through Pierce's "Types and Programming Languages" - he slips a reasonably precise definition of "value" in a programming context into the text:

[...] defines a subset of terms, called values, that are possible final results of evaluation

This seems like a rather tidy definition - i.e., we take the set of all possible terms, and the ones that can possibly be left over after all evaluation has taken place are values.

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  • Note that it coincides with my previously proposed definition perfectly. One question remains what if semantics of language is given without notion of evaluation? It may be assembly-like language, for example. My definition works well with this case.
    – Vag
    Aug 29, 2010 at 10:53
  • Pre-state/post-state seems a reasonable analog of evaluation in higher-level languages?
    – Gian
    Aug 29, 2010 at 19:42
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Based on the ongoing comments about "bits" being an unacceptable definition, I think this one is a little better (although possibly still flawed):

A value is anything representable on a piece of possibly-infinite Turing machine tape.

Edit: I'm refining this some more.

A value is a member of the set of possible interpretations of any possibly-infinite sequence of symbols.

That is equivalent to the earlier definition based on Turing machine tape, but it actually generalises better.

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  • You might as well just say, a value is anything that can be mapped to an integer. That's the same statement and clearer. (edited slightly, "integer" instead of number)
    – mqp
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:39
  • But then the definition of "value" becomes contingent on the definition of "integer", and I don't feel like opening that can of worms. However it seems like that could be used to formulate an acceptable alternative-but-equivalent definition.
    – Gian
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:40
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    Yeah, but any other numeric forms it can represent can be mapped one-to-one to integers. For example, it can't represent an irrational number directly, unless you can define that irrational number as a function of something else. (But it can represent rational numbers, since they map to integers.)
    – mqp
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:48
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    Finally I've understood you answer. There is great deal of sanity behind it. But I guess correct definition lies somewhere between ours.
    – Vag
    Jul 22, 2010 at 9:25
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    @Gian: I'd argue that it's assignment of meaning in the narrowest sense but we're into arguing English language semantics. I see the breadth of your definition but I don't think I can get past the word 'value' and the assignation of value as giving something worth and therefore meaning and/or context. It's probably my age :)
    – Lazarus
    Jul 29, 2010 at 21:53
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Here, I'll take a shot: A value is a piece of stored information (in the information-theoretical sense) that can be manipulated by the computer.

(I won't say that a value has meaning; a random number in a register may have no meaning, but it's still a value.)

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  • Sure; a random number contains lots of information, but might have no meaning to anyone.
    – mqp
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:44
  • I'm upvoting this because I think it's the closest we can get, if we interpret "information" in the sense of "an ordered sequence of symbols". If we take that definition, it's isomorphic with the definition I gave based on Turing tape.
    – Gian
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:44
  • On reflection, I'm uncomfortable with "that can be manipulated by the computer". That refers to first-class values only. From first-class values we can have higher-order values that we can reason about, but which cannot be manipulated by the computer without encoding them into a first-class representation.
    – Gian
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:46
  • I see that this is a real substantial difference between our definitions. For example, you would say that any function is a value, since you can obviously represent it uniquely as some series of bits. I would prefer to use "value" to mean only simpler, more "atomic" things that really are manipulated directly by the computer. Perhaps your definition is better, but mine matches what is in my head when I hear "value."
    – mqp
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:53
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    Give me a try on my own: 1. Without mentioning some programming language P with semantics S notion 'value' is meaningless. 2. If there exist reduction semantics RS that is equivalent to S then values are these terms of RS that reduces to themselves. 3. If there exist "imperative" semantics IS (i.e. semantics with one storage mentioned in it) that is equivalent to S then values are exactly elements storeable in the storage of IS. 4. If there are no such semantics definable as in (2) or (3) then in context of P word 'value' is meaningless.
    – Vag
    Jul 22, 2010 at 7:36
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In short, a value is some assigned meaning to a variable (the object containing the value)

For example type=boolean; name=help; variable=a storage location; value=what is stored in that location;

Further break down:

X = 2; where X is a variable while 2 is the value stored in X.

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  • Does this mean the value of name is help? Sep 25, 2020 at 7:58
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Have you checked the article in wikipedia?

In computer science, a value is a sequence of bits that is interpreted according to some data type. It is possible for the same sequence of bits to have different values, depending on the type used to interpret its meaning. For instance, the value could be an integer or floating point value, or a string.

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    Wikipedia's explanation is incorrect: "In computer science, a value is a sequence of bits that is interpreted according to some data type." If I build a computer without bits it still be value manipulating.
    – Vag
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:10
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    I know you're just quoting Wikipedia, but "sequence of bits" seems overly-specific about the representation of values, don't you think? I mean, sure, any other representation we choose may be isomorphic with "bits", but I really don't think that's a meaningful thing to encode into the definition.
    – Gian
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:11
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    Errrrrr... A computer without bits... Maybe you should start by reading the wikipedia article on computers... : S
    – Macmade
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:11
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    Macmade, I don't follow you. There are many computers without bits: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternary_computer
    – mqp
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:13
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    I disagree that "binary computer science" is computer science at all, although I've certainly never heard of the term before. Most computer science can be done without reference to computers, and the rest is usually done with reference to machines abstracted far above the bit level. I can't think of much "computer science" that really cares how things are represented once implemented.
    – Gian
    Jul 21, 2010 at 15:52
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Read the Wiki

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