62

I am facing a strange behavior of the round() function:

for i in range(1, 15, 2):
    n = i / 2
    print(n, "=>", round(n))

This code prints:

0.5 => 0
1.5 => 2
2.5 => 2
3.5 => 4
4.5 => 4
5.5 => 6
6.5 => 6

I expected the floating values to be always rounded up, but instead, it is rounded to the nearest even number.

Why such behavior, and what is the best way to get the correct result?

I tried to use the fractions but the result is the same.

  • 2
    can't explain the behaviour of round() but you could use math.ceil() if you always want to round up – yurib Oct 8 '15 at 15:16
  • 2
    @yurib I would like 1.3 to be rounded down to 1, so I can not use ceil(). – Delgan Oct 8 '15 at 15:17
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Limiting floats to two decimal points – yurib Oct 8 '15 at 15:19
  • 2
    Many days have passed since I studied error analysis. However If I recall correctly, the rounding of 5*10**-k depends on the digit preceding it. By rounding up for uneven digits and down for even digits, you get a positive error half the time and an even error half the time (in theory). When you perform many additions, those errors can cancel each-other – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Oct 8 '15 at 15:22

16 Answers 16

55

The Numeric Types section documents this behaviour explicitly:

round(x[, n])
x rounded to n digits, rounding half to even. If n is omitted, it defaults to 0.

Note the rounding half to even. This is also called bankers rounding; instead of always rounding up or down (compounding rounding errors), by rounding to the nearest even number you average out rounding errors.

If you need more control over the rounding behaviour, use the decimal module, which lets you specify exactly what rounding strategy should be used.

For example, to round up from half:

>>> from decimal import localcontext, Decimal, ROUND_HALF_UP
>>> with localcontext() as ctx:
...     ctx.rounding = ROUND_HALF_UP
...     for i in range(1, 15, 2):
...         n = Decimal(i) / 2
...         print(n, '=>', n.to_integral_value())
...
0.5 => 1
1.5 => 2
2.5 => 3
3.5 => 4
4.5 => 5
5.5 => 6
6.5 => 7
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    IEEE 754 rounding half to even is also described at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rounding#Round_half_to_even – Robert E Oct 8 '15 at 15:54
  • In your example, is there a benefit to modifying the local context as opposed to just using the rounding argument as in: n.to_integral_value(rounding=ROUND_HALF_UP)? – dhobbs Mar 16 '19 at 4:45
  • @dhobbs: setting the context once is clearer in intent, but from a technical point of view there is no difference. – Martijn Pieters Mar 16 '19 at 14:14
28

For example:

from decimal import Decimal, ROUND_HALF_UP

Decimal(1.5).quantize(0, ROUND_HALF_UP)

# This also works for rounding to the integer part:
Decimal(1.5).to_integral_value(rounding=ROUND_HALF_UP)
| improve this answer | |
20

You can use this:

import math
def normal_round(n):
    if n - math.floor(n) < 0.5:
        return math.floor(n)
    return math.ceil(n)

It will round number up or down properly.

| improve this answer | |
17

round() will round either up or down, depending on if the number is even or odd. A simple way to only round up is:

int(num + 0.5)

If you want this to work properly for negative numbers use:

((num > 0) - (num < 0)) * int(abs(num) + 0.5)

Note, this can mess up for large numbers or really precise numbers like 5000000000000001.0 and 0.49999999999999994.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    There are some subtleties that aren't addressed by this solution. E.g., what result does this give if num = -2.4? What about num = 0.49999999999999994? num = 5000000000000001.0? On a typical machine using IEEE 754 format and semantics, this solution gives the wrong answer for all three of these cases. – Mark Dickinson Apr 10 '18 at 11:37
  • @Mark Dickinson I've updated the post to mention this. Thanks – Matthew D. Scholefield Apr 10 '18 at 16:10
5

The behavior you are seeing is typical IEEE 754 rounding behavior. If it has to choose between two numbers that are equally different from the input, it always picks the even one. The advantage of this behavior is that the average rounding effect is zero - equally many numbers round up and down. If you round the half way numbers in a consistent direction the rounding will affect the expected value.

The behavior you are seeing is correct if the objective is fair rounding, but that is not always what is needed.

One trick to get the type of rounding you want is to add 0.5 and then take the floor. For example, adding 0.5 to 2.5 gives 3, with floor 3.

| improve this answer | |
4

Love the fedor2612 answer. I expanded it with an optional "decimals" argument for those who want to use this function to round any number of decimals (say for example if you want to round a currency $26.455 to $26.46).

import math

def normal_round(n, decimals=0):
    expoN = n * 10 ** decimals
    if abs(expoN) - abs(math.floor(expoN)) < 0.5:
        return math.floor(expoN) / 10 ** decimals
    return math.ceil(expoN) / 10 ** decimals

oldRounding = round(26.455,2)
newRounding = normal_round(26.455,2)

print(oldRounding)
print(newRounding)

Output:

26.45

26.46

| improve this answer | |
3

Short version: use the decimal module. It can represent numbers like 2.675 precisely, unlike Python floats where 2.675 is really 2.67499999999999982236431605997495353221893310546875 (exactly). And you can specify the rounding you desire: ROUND_CEILING, ROUND_DOWN, ROUND_FLOOR, ROUND_HALF_DOWN, ROUND_HALF_EVEN, ROUND_HALF_UP, ROUND_UP, and ROUND_05UP are all options.

| improve this answer | |
1

Rounding to the nearest even number has become common practice in numerical disciplines. "Rounding up" produces a slight bias towards larger results.

So, from the perspective of the scientific establishment, round has the correct behavior.

| improve this answer | |
1

Here is another solution. It will work as normal rounding in excel.

from decimal import Decimal, getcontext, ROUND_HALF_UP

round_context = getcontext()
round_context.rounding = ROUND_HALF_UP

def c_round(x, digits, precision=5):
    tmp = round(Decimal(x), precision)
    return float(tmp.__round__(digits))

c_round(0.15, 1) -> 0.2, c_round(0.5, 0) -> 1

| improve this answer | |
1

In the question this is basically an issue when dividing a positive integer by 2. The easisest way is int(n + 0.5) for individual numbers.

However we cannot apply this to series, therefore what we then can do for example for a pandas dataframe, and without going into loops, is:

import numpy as np
df['rounded_division'] = np.where(df['some_integer'] % 2 == 0, round(df['some_integer']/2,0), round((df['some_integer']+1)/2,0))
| improve this answer | |
0

You can use:

from decimal import Decimal, ROUND_HALF_UP

for i in range(1, 15, 2):
    n = i / 2
    print(n, "=>", Decimal(str(n)).quantize(Decimal("1"), rounding=ROUND_HALF_UP))
| improve this answer | |
0

A classical mathematical rounding without any libraries

def rd(x,y=0):
''' A classical mathematical rounding by Voznica '''
m = int('1'+'0'*y) # multiplier - how many positions to the right
q = x*m # shift to the right by multiplier
c = int(q) # new number
i = int( (q-c)*10 ) # indicator number on the right
if i >= 5:
    c += 1
return c/m

Compare:

print( round(0.49), round(0.51), round(0.5), round(1.5), round(2.5), round(0.15,1))  # 0  1  0  2  2  0.1

print( rd(0.49), rd(0.51), rd(0.5), rd(1.5), rd(2.5), rd(0.15,1))  # 0  1  1  2  3  0.2
| improve this answer | |
0

The following solution achieved "school fashion rounding" without using the decimal module (which turns out to be slow).

def school_round(a_in,n_in):
''' python uses "banking round; while this round 0.05 up" '''
    if (a_in * 10 ** (n_in + 1)) % 10 == 5:
        return round(a_in + 1 / 10 ** (n_in + 1), n_in)
    else:
        return round(a_in, n_in)

e.g.

print(round(0.005,2)) # 0
print(school_round(0.005,2)) #0.01
| improve this answer | |
0

You can try this

def round(num):
    return round(num + 10**(-9))

it will work since num = x.5 will always will be x.5 + 0.00...01 in the process which its closer to x+1 hence the round function will work properly and it will round x.5 to x+1

| improve this answer | |
  • Now x.499999999 will be subject to half-even rounding, and will (half the time, assuming floating point precision issues don't force it one way or the other) get rounded up. That's worse than the initial scenario, as you're now rounding to the more distant number. – ShadowRanger Aug 19 '19 at 17:21
0

Knowing that round(9.99,0) rounds to int=10 and int(9.99) rounds to int=9 brings success:

Goal: Provide lower and higher round number depending on value

    def get_half_round_numers(self, value):
        """
        Returns dict with upper_half_rn and lower_half_rn
        :param value:
        :return:
        """
        hrns = {}
        if not isinstance(value, float):
            print("Error>Input is not a float. None return.")
            return None

        value = round(value,2)
        whole = int(value) # Rounds 9.99 to 9
        remainder = (value - whole) * 100

        if remainder >= 51:
            hrns['upper_half_rn'] = round(round(value,0),2)  # Rounds 9.99 to 10
            hrns['lower_half_rn'] = round(round(value,0) - 0.5,2)
        else:
            hrns['lower_half_rn'] = round(int(value),2)
            hrns['upper_half_rn'] = round(int(value) + 0.5,2)

        return hrns

Some testing:

enter image description here

yw

| improve this answer | |
0
import math
# round tossing n digits from the end
def my_round(n, toss=1):

    def normal_round(n):
        if isinstance(n, int):
            return n
        intn, dec = str(n).split(".")
        if int(dec[-1]) >= 5:
            if len(dec) == 1:
                return math.ceil(n)
            else:
                return float(intn + "." + str(int(dec[:-1]) + 1))
        else:
            return float(intn + "." + dec[:-1])

    while toss >= 1:
        n = normal_round(n)
        toss -= 1
    return n


for n in [1.25, 7.3576, 30.56]:
    print(my_round(n, 2))

1.0
7.36
31
| improve this answer | |

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