8

Thanks in advance. I appreciate any help.

I would like to compare two arbitrary JTokens of the same type and structure (Json.Net from NewtonSoft).

static int CompareTokens(JToken x, JToken y);  
// possible output: 0 / 1 / -1

The main goal is to be able use this method to sort two Json strings, so that even if in the begining they had the same data, but in the different order, in the end these are two exactly same strings. So the sort criterion doesn't really matter, it just matters that this criterion is always the same. And each small element of data should be taken into account.

JToken can be of one of next several types: Array, Boolean, Date, Float, Guid, Integer, Null, Object, Property, String, TimeSpan, Uri. I don't take into account comparing Bytes, Comment, Constructor, None, Undefined, Raw.

  • It would be great to gain some idea about comparing JArrays and JObjects. That shoud be some recursive comparison, because JArrays may consist of other JArrays and JObjects and vice versa. Any idea would be appreciated.
  • But knowing about comparing simpler types would also be very helpful. I wonder rather about knowing how to convert from JToken to actual type (than about knowing how to do it logically).
  • JValue has IComparable implemented, but i didn't figure out how to convert simple typed JToken to JValue. Knowing about this would also be helpful.

This is quite a havy question. If i figure out how to do it, i'll put a +100 on it. And sorry for my English.

10
  • Use JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T> and parse directly into a predefined class because you already know the data incoming. This way you can use standard comparison with all the familiar types of data. – SkryptX Oct 8 '15 at 18:11
  • 1) Take a look at the source code for JToken.DeepEquals, it may give you some ideas. 2) How do you want to compare convertible values such as 1 and "1"? – dbc Oct 8 '15 at 18:14
  • @dbc That's why he should parse into an Object... There he can specify the type and deal with it accordingly... – SkryptX Oct 8 '15 at 18:16
  • 1
    2) JValue implements IComparable<JValue>, so that's a start. – dbc Oct 8 '15 at 18:16
  • 1
    Who uses an arbitrary getHashCode anyways... I would never use getHashCode except I programmed it myself or it's clearly stated that it is something useful behind. – SkryptX Oct 8 '15 at 18:29
15
+100

In Linq-to-JSON, JValue represents a primitive value (string, number, boolean, and so on). It implements IComparable<JValue>, so Json.NET takes care of sorting primitive values for you.

Building off of that, you're going to need to recursively descend the two JToken object hierarchies in parallel. When you encounter the first token with a different .Net type, or different properties (if not a JValue), or with a different value (if a JValue), you need to return back the comparison value.

Keep in mind the following:

  • A comparison method should be reflexive, antisymmetric and transitive.
  • Container tokens of different .Net type need to be ordered by type in some consistent manner.
  • the child tokens of JArray and JConstructor are ordered.
  • the child tokens of JObject are not, so they need to be compared in some stable, symmetric manner. Walking both in order of property name would seem to work.
  • There is no obvious way to compare JRaw, so don't try, and let an exception get thrown.

The following is a prototype implementation:

public class JTokenComparer : IComparer<JToken>
{
    public static JTokenComparer Instance { get { return instance; } }

    static JTokenComparer instance;

    static JTokenComparer()
    {
        instance = new JTokenComparer();
    }

    readonly Dictionary<Type, KeyValuePair<int, IComparer<JToken>>> dict;

    JTokenComparer()
    {
        dict = new Dictionary<Type, KeyValuePair<int, IComparer<JToken>>>
        {
            // Order chosen semi-arbitrarily.  Putting values first seems reasonable though.
            {typeof(JValue), new KeyValuePair<int, IComparer<JToken>>(0, new JValueComparer()) },
            {typeof(JProperty), new KeyValuePair<int, IComparer<JToken>>(1, new JPropertyComparer()) },
            {typeof(JArray), new KeyValuePair<int, IComparer<JToken>>(2, new JArrayComparer()) },
            {typeof(JObject), new KeyValuePair<int, IComparer<JToken>>(3, new JObjectComparer()) },
            {typeof(JConstructor), new KeyValuePair<int, IComparer<JToken>>(4, new JConstructorComparer()) },
        };
    }

    #region IComparer<JToken> Members

    public int Compare(JToken x, JToken y)
    {
        if (x is JRaw || y is JRaw)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Tokens of type JRaw cannot be sorted");
        if (object.ReferenceEquals(x, y))
            return 0;
        else if (x == null)
            return -1;
        else if (y == null)
            return 1;

        var typeData1 = dict[x.GetType()];
        var typeData2 = dict[y.GetType()];

        int comp;
        if ((comp = typeData1.Key.CompareTo(typeData2.Key)) != 0)
            return comp;
        if (typeData1.Value != typeData2.Value)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("inconsistent dictionary values"); // Internal error
        return typeData2.Value.Compare(x, y);
    }

    #endregion
}

abstract class JTokenComparerBase<TJToken> : IComparer<JToken> where TJToken : JToken
{
    protected TJToken CheckType(JToken item)
    {
        if (item != null && item.GetType() != typeof(TJToken))
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Actual type {0} of token \"{1}\" does not match expected type {2}", item.GetType(), item, typeof(TJToken)));
        return (TJToken)item;
    }

    protected bool TryBaseCompare(TJToken x, TJToken y, out int comparison)
    {
        CheckType(x);
        CheckType(y);
        if (object.ReferenceEquals(x, y))
        {
            comparison = 0;
            return true;
        }
        else if (x == null)
        {
            comparison = -1;
            return true;
        }
        else if (y == null)
        {
            comparison = 1;
            return true;
        }
        comparison = 0;
        return false;
    }

    protected abstract int CompareDerived(TJToken x, TJToken y);

    protected int TokenCompare(JToken x, JToken y)
    {
        var tx = CheckType(x);
        var ty = CheckType(y);
        int comp;
        if (TryBaseCompare(tx, ty, out comp))
            return comp;
        return CompareDerived(tx, ty);
    }

    #region IComparer<JToken> Members

    int IComparer<JToken>.Compare(JToken x, JToken y)
    {
        return TokenCompare(x, y);
    }

    #endregion
}

abstract class JContainerOrderedComparerBase<TJToken> : JTokenComparerBase<TJToken> where TJToken : JContainer
{
    protected int CompareItemsInOrder(TJToken x, TJToken y)
    {
        int comp;
        // Dictionary order: sort on items before number of items.
        for (int i = 0, n = Math.Min(x.Count, y.Count); i < n; i++)
            if ((comp = JTokenComparer.Instance.Compare(x[i], y[i])) != 0)
                return comp;
        if ((comp = x.Count.CompareTo(y.Count)) != 0)
            return comp;
        return 0;
    }
}

class JPropertyComparer : JTokenComparerBase<JProperty>
{
    protected override int CompareDerived(JProperty x, JProperty y)
    {
        int comp;
        if ((comp = x.Name.CompareTo(y.Name)) != 0)
            return comp;
        return JTokenComparer.Instance.Compare(x.Value, y.Value);
    }
}

class JObjectComparer : JTokenComparerBase<JObject>
{
    protected override int CompareDerived(JObject x, JObject y)
    {
        int comp;
        // Dictionary order: sort on items before number of items.
        // Order both property sequences to preserve reflexivity.
        foreach (var propertyComp in x.Properties().OrderBy(p => p.Name).Zip(y.Properties().OrderBy(p => p.Name), (xp, yp) => JTokenComparer.Instance.Compare(xp, yp)))
            if (propertyComp != 0)
                return propertyComp;
        if ((comp = x.Count.CompareTo(y.Count)) != 0)
            return comp;
        return 0;
    }
}

class JArrayComparer : JContainerOrderedComparerBase<JArray>
{
    protected override int CompareDerived(JArray x, JArray y)
    {
        int comp;
        if ((comp = CompareItemsInOrder(x, y)) != 0)
            return comp;
        return 0;
    }
}

class JConstructorComparer : JContainerOrderedComparerBase<JConstructor>
{
    protected override int CompareDerived(JConstructor x, JConstructor y)
    {
        int comp;
        if ((comp = x.Name.CompareTo(y.Name)) != 0)
            return comp;
        if ((comp = CompareItemsInOrder(x, y)) != 0)
            return comp;
        return 0;
    }
}

class JValueComparer : JTokenComparerBase<JValue>
{
    protected override int CompareDerived(JValue x, JValue y)
    {
        return Comparer<JToken>.Default.Compare(x, y); // JValue implements IComparable<JValue>
    }
}

Lightly tested prototype fiddle.

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  • 2
    WOW! That's some really great work! Thanks A LOT! What I've been doing by now is not as well-designed. I hope i don't forget to put the 100 points in two days, and hope you get them. But points do not really matter, i'm lucky, because you've saved me the day! – Andrey K. Oct 8 '15 at 21:17
  • I'm new to SO and it happens that the possibility of putting +100 is gone after i accepted the answer... – Andrey K. Oct 9 '15 at 18:39
  • At the moment the comparison doesn't work right when comparing two arrays of strings with same data but in different order. May be could be useful for someone to know. – Andrey K. Oct 9 '15 at 18:41
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    @AndreyKomissarov It is still possible to add a bounty for a question after the answer has been accepted-- you just need to wait 48 hours after the question was originally asked. After that, there should be a "Start a bounty" link underneath the comments section of the question. See What is a bounty? How can I start one? in the Help Center. – Brian Rogers Oct 9 '15 at 21:16
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    @dbc I'm really sorry about the 'string arrays in different order'. It's was my falt it my code, which i didn't notice. Yor code seems to work. – Andrey K. Oct 12 '15 at 10:32
3

This could, actually, be done with less code. Not as nice, because using string comparison instead of JValue comparison.

Following is not an exact answer to my own question, but the goal is achieved.

    public static JToken Normalize(this JToken token)
    {
        var result = token;

        switch (token.Type)
        {
            case JTokenType.Object:
                var jObject = (JObject)token;

                if (jObject != null && jObject.HasValues)
                {
                    var newObject = new JObject();

                    foreach (var property in jObject.Properties().OrderBy(x => x.Name).ToList())
                    {
                        var value = property.Value as JToken;
                        if (value != null)
                        {
                            value = Normalize(value);
                        }

                        newObject.Add(property.Name, value);
                    }
                    return newObject;
                }

                break;

            case JTokenType.Array:

                var jArray = (JArray)token;

                if (jArray != null && jArray.Count > 0)
                {
                    var normalizedArrayItems = jArray
                        .Select(x => Normalize(x))
                        .OrderBy(x => x.ToString(), StringComparer.Ordinal);

                    result = new JArray(normalizedArrayItems);
                }

                break;
            default:
                break;
        }

        return result;
    }

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