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I'm trying to build some tests around a controller. I am injecting a test with $stateParams, and navigating to the same state twice. The first test passes, but the second test fails because it thinks the creationId is still 1.

    it('should navigate to customizer with a creation ID', function (done) {
        inject(function ($state, $stateParams, $rootScope) {
            $state.go('customizer', {creationId: 1});
            $rootScope.$digest();
            expect($stateParams).to.have.property('creationId','1');

            done();
        });
    });

    it('should navigate to customizer without a creation ID', function (done) {
        inject(function ($state, $stateParams, $rootScope) {
            $state.go('customizer');
            $rootScope.$digest();
            expect($stateParams).to.not.have.property('creationId','1');

            done();
        });
    });

Why is this happening? Is there something I need to run on beforeEach or afterEach to clear the state?

  • 1
    You really should be using mocks / spies for $state, $stateParams, and other injectables. What you're essentially doing here is testing ui.router which is already well tested – Phil Oct 9 '15 at 0:42
3

As mentioned in the comment on the question, to make the test do the testing of the controller, $state should be mocked out with some way of verifying if the state transitions have happened.

This is what we have been using in one of our open source projects:

state-mock.js

angular.module('stateMock', []);
angular.module('stateMock').service('stateMock', function($q) {
    'use strict';

    this.expectedTransitions = [];

    this.transitionTo = function(stateName, params) {
        if (this.expectedTransitions.length > 0) {
            var expectedState = this.expectedTransitions.shift();
            if (expectedState.stateName !== stateName) {
                throw Error('Expected transition to state: ' + expectedState.stateName + ' but transitioned to ' + stateName);
            }
            if (!angular.equals(expectedState.params, params)) {
                throw Error('Expected params to be ' + JSON.stringify(expectedState.params) + ' but received ' + JSON.stringify(params));
            }
        } else {
            throw Error('No more transitions were expected! Tried to transition to ' + stateName);
        }
        // console.log('Mock transition to: ' + stateName + ' with params: ' + JSON.stringify(params));
        return $q.when();
    };

    this.go = this.transitionTo;

    this.expectTransitionTo = function(stateName, params) {
        this.expectedTransitions.push({
            stateName: stateName,
            params: params
        });
    };

    this.ensureAllTransitionsHappened = function() {
        if (this.expectedTransitions.length > 0) {
            throw Error('Not all transitions happened!');
        }
    };
});

And these lines from a spec should give you a fair idea of how this can be used.

describe('state', function() {

    it('should transition correctly on invoking previous', function() {
        state.expectTransitionTo('month', {
            year: 2015,
            month: 7
        });
        $scope.previous();
        state.ensureAllTransitionsHappened();
    });

    it('should transition correctly on invoking next', function() {
        state.expectTransitionTo('month', {
            year: 2015,
            month: 9
        });
        $scope.next();
        state.ensureAllTransitionsHappened();
    });

    it('should transition correctly on month change', function() {
        state.expectTransitionTo('month', {
            year: 2015,
            month: 1
        });
        calendar.month = 1;
        $scope.$digest();
        state.ensureAllTransitionsHappened();
    });

    it('should transition correctly on year change', function() {
        state.expectTransitionTo('month', {
            year: 1979,
            month: 8
        });
        calendar.year = 1979;
        $scope.$digest();
        state.ensureAllTransitionsHappened();
    });

});
  • 1
    I'm just surprised at how much work it's going to take... so I should be writing mocks for all my angular dependencies? even things like $location or $upload (ng-file-upload)? – Omid Ahourai Oct 9 '15 at 15:03
  • 1
    @ArdentKid - It depends. If we're testing the controller and you would not want any of the original dependency to interfere with the tests, then we should use mocks. Otherwise, using the real dependencies should not be a problem. – Floyd Pink Oct 9 '15 at 15:12

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