17

I generate a matplotlib 3d surface plot. I only need to see the upper-triangular half of the matrix on the plot, as the other half is redundant.

np.triu() makes the redundant half of the matrix zeros, but I'd prefer if I can make them Nans, then those cells don't show up at all on the surface plot.

What would be a pythonic way to fill with NaN instead of zeros? I cannot do a search-and-replace 0 with NaN, as zeros will appear in the legitimate data I want to display.

3 Answers 3

29

You can use numpy.tril_indices() to assign the NaN value to lower triangle, e.g.:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> m = np.triu(np.arange(0, 12, dtype=np.float).reshape(4,3))
>>> m
array([[ 0.,  1.,  2.],
       [ 0.,  4.,  5.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  8.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.]])
>>> m[np.tril_indices(m.shape[0], -1)] = np.nan
>>> m
array([[  0.,   1.,   2.],
       [ nan,   4.,   5.],
       [ nan,  nan,   8.],
       [ nan,  nan,  nan]])
1
  • this is a nice solution, I like it. Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 3:30
6

tril_indices() might be the obvious approach here that generates the lower triangular indices and then you can use those to set those in input array to NaNs.

Now, if you care about performance, you can use boolean indexing after creating a mask of such lower triangular shape and then set those to NaNs. The implementation would look like this -

m[np.arange(m.shape[0])[:,None] > np.arange(m.shape[1])] = np.nan

So, np.arange(m.shape[0])[:,None] > np.arange(m.shape[1]) is the mask here that was created using broadcasting.

Sample run -

In [51]: m
Out[51]: 
array([[ 11.,  49.,  23.,  30.],
       [ 40.,  41.,  19.,  26.],
       [ 32.,  36.,  30.,  25.],
       [ 15.,  27.,  25.,  40.],
       [ 33.,  18.,  45.,  43.]])

In [52]: np.arange(m.shape[0])[:,None] > np.arange(m.shape[1]) # mask
Out[52]: 
array([[False, False, False, False],
       [ True, False, False, False],
       [ True,  True, False, False],
       [ True,  True,  True, False],
       [ True,  True,  True,  True]], dtype=bool)

In [53]: m[np.arange(m.shape[0])[:,None] > np.arange(m.shape[1])] = np.nan

In [54]: m
Out[54]: 
array([[ 11.,  49.,  23.,  30.],
       [ nan,  41.,  19.,  26.],
       [ nan,  nan,  30.,  25.],
       [ nan,  nan,  nan,  40.],
       [ nan,  nan,  nan,  nan]])

Runtime tests -

This section compares the boolean indexing based approach listed in this solution to np.tril_indices based one in the other solution for performance.

In [38]: m = np.random.randint(10,50,(1000,1100)).astype(float)

In [39]: %timeit m[np.tril_indices(m.shape[0], -1)] = np.nan
10 loops, best of 3: 62.8 ms per loop

In [40]: m = np.random.randint(10,50,(1000,1100)).astype(float)

In [41]: %timeit m[np.arange(m.shape[0])[:,None] > np.arange(m.shape[1])] = np.nan
100 loops, best of 3: 8.03 ms per loop
1
  • Ha, pretty slick solution. Fortunately my matrix is small, but for a giant matrix, makes good sense. Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 15:07
-1

Shape or layout doesn't matter for the purpose of this example, so let's say we have a 2D array a such that:

>>> a
array([[ 0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.]])

and we want all 0 values to be NaN. Just use a list comprehension.

>>> b = numpy.array([[i if i else numpy.nan for i in j] for j in a])
>>> b
array([[ nan,  nan,  nan],
       [ nan,  nan,   1.]])

If you have specific cells that won't be zero, then specify them in the comprehension.

1
  • Thanks. Dunno, so far everything I've encountered with numpy is, "if its doing iterations, you're not doing it ideally". I suspect there will be more pythonic answers to this problem. Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 4:02

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