21

I want to run some code when the Window or Control is first displayed. I can't use Loaded because that can fire more than once. I can't use Initialized because that is done by the constructor.

Is there an event somewhere between?

31

Unfortunately there is no such event. You can use a boolean in the Loaded Method to make sure your stuff only fires once -

if(!IsSetUp)
{
   MySetUpFunction();
   IsSetUp = true;
}

Check out the WPF Windows lifetime events here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms748948.aspx#Window_Lifetime_Events

alt text
(source: microsoft.com)

  • 6
    Well that's stupid, I shouldn't have to use guard clauses like that. But it's the right answer so here's your point. – Jonathan Allen Jul 21 '10 at 20:12
  • 1
    Agreed - you could create your own window class inheriting from window and implement an event across your whole project if it's something your doing frequently. – brendan Jul 21 '10 at 20:52
  • 2
    Please also see this: blogs.msdn.com/b/mikehillberg/archive/2006/09/19/… – Blake Niemyjski May 9 '12 at 15:28
  • There is indeed such an event, inherited by Window from FrameworkElement: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – ProfK Dec 22 '16 at 20:30
  • From this picture, I don't see Loaded can fire more than once, anything I missed? – Felix Feb 7 '17 at 3:03
6

Alternatively to storing a boolean flag, you can use an extension method and delegate wrapping to fake Loaded only firing once.

public static void OnLoadedOnce(
    this UserControl control,
    RoutedEventHandler onLoaded)
{
    if (control == null || onLoaded == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException();
    }

    RoutedEventHandler wrappedOnLoaded = null;
    wrappedOnLoaded = delegate(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        control.Loaded -= wrappedOnLoaded;
        onLoaded(sender, e);
    };
    control.Loaded += wrappedOnLoaded;
}

...

class MyControl : UserControl
{
    public MyControl()
    { 
        InitializeComponent();
        this.OnLoadedOnce(this.OnControlLoaded /* or delegate {...} */);
    }

    private void OnControlLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
    }
}
1

If you don't want to use the boolean method of doing things, then you can create a method and subscribe to the Loaded event with it, then unsubscribe at the end of that method.

Example:

public MyDependencyObject(){
  Loaded += OnLoaded;
}

private void OnLoaded(object sender, EventArgs args){
  DoThings();
  Loaded -= OnLoaded;
}

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