2

This question already has an answer here:

I want to use a byte array as a lookup key in a concurentDictionary. Currently I solve this by using a custom EqualityComparer<byte[]>.

This works fine, but I do realize that my hashcode generator will generate a lot of overlaps where things end up in the same hash bucket.

public class ByteArrayEqualityComparer : EqualityComparer<byte[]>
{
    public override bool Equals(byte[] x, byte[] y)
    {
        //fast buffer compare
        return UnsafeCompare(x, y);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode(byte[] obj)
    {
        int hash = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < obj.Length; i += 2)
        {
            hash += obj[i]; //xor? shift? black magic?
        }
        return hash;
    }
}

What would be a good formula to create a relatively fast hash from the byte array?

My idea is that I can calculate the hashcode by skipping every x bytes for speed. As the final comparison is still done over the full data set, it seems pointless to compare all bytes multiple times.

I imagine that some xor magic and shifting on the hash var would make things better.

This is extremely performance critical, so any shortcut that can be used is welcome too.

[edit] I ended up using this solution. I use a struct to wrap the byte array so that I can use a cached hashcode for it instead of calculating it for each comparison. This resulted in a very nice performance gain.

public struct ByteArrayKey
{
    public readonly byte[] Bytes;
    private readonly int _hashCode;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        var other = (ByteArrayKey) obj;
        return Compare(Bytes, other.Bytes);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return _hashCode;
    }

    private static int GetHashCode([NotNull] byte[] bytes)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            var hash = 17;
            for (var i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
            {
                hash = hash*23 + bytes[i];
            }
            return hash;
        }
    }

    public ByteArrayKey(byte[] bytes)
    {
        Bytes = bytes;
        _hashCode = GetHashCode(bytes);
    }

    public static ByteArrayKey Create(byte[] bytes)
    {
        return new ByteArrayKey(bytes);
    }

    public static unsafe bool Compare(byte[] a1, byte[] a2)
    {
        if (a1 == null || a2 == null || a1.Length != a2.Length)
            return false;
        fixed (byte* p1 = a1, p2 = a2)
        {
            byte* x1 = p1, x2 = p2;
            var l = a1.Length;
            for (var i = 0; i < l/8; i++, x1 += 8, x2 += 8)
                if (*(long*) x1 != *(long*) x2) return false;
            if ((l & 4) != 0)
            {
                if (*(int*) x1 != *(int*) x2) return false;
                x1 += 4;
                x2 += 4;
            }
            if ((l & 2) != 0)
            {
                if (*(short*) x1 != *(short*) x2) return false;
                x1 += 2;
                x2 += 2;
            }
            if ((l & 1) != 0) if (*x1 != *x2) return false;
            return true;
        }
    }
}

marked as duplicate by Rawling c# Oct 9 '15 at 7:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    The standard pattern is e.g. here. If that's useful to you I'll close this question as a duplicate. – Rawling Oct 9 '15 at 7:16
  • 1
    that seems exactly what I need, thanks! – Roger Johansson Oct 9 '15 at 7:19
  • 2
    I really don't see how this is a duplicate since the meat of the question is around the comparisons of byte arrays – Oliver Sep 5 '16 at 15:28
1

A better choice for a hash could be something like this:

public override int GetHashCode(byte[] obj)
{
    int hash = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < obj.Length; i++)
    {
        exponents = [0, 8, 16, 24];
        exponent = exponents[i % 4];

        unchecked
        {
            hash += obj[i] * (1 << i);
        }
    }
    return hash;
}

Conceptually, this converts each chunk of 4 bytes into an int, since both are 32 bits, and then adds them together with standard integer overflow. So, all unique byte arrays of length 4 or less will map to different hash codes and (given random data) larger arrays should be well distributed in the hash space. If you're expecting lots of very similar arrays, or arrays that repeat every 4 or something, this might not be the best strategy.

0

MurmurHash is pretty fast and quite simple. There's a number of .NET-based implementations, but I don't exactly know how performant are they.

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