2

I'm studying to understand class constructor and destructor. I have written a small console code to add one class instance in to a vector. All is nice and dandy, but what I fail to understand is, that adding one Object in to the vector triggers destructor twice. Why does this happen?

If I don't add any object, the vector doesn't trigger constructor or destructor on its own, so why it happens twice?

Can anyone explain why this happens?

#include <cstdio>
#include <vector>
class Test
{
    private:
        int value;

    public:
        Test()
        {
            printf("\nClass constructor triggered.");
        };
        ~Test()
        {
            printf("\nClass desctructor triggered.");
        }
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<Test> container;

    container.push_back( Test() );
    return 0;
}

UPDATE: I added some more information to the class so that I get more specific output, however now I noticed that with each addition to the vector the move-construction and destructor calls increase. Are the amount of these calls tied to the amount of objects within the vector or what is happening? Am I having a leak? Sorry if too stupid questions. Below is the added code:

#include <cstdio>
#include <vector>

class Test
{
    private:
        int value;

    public:
        // Constructor
        Test(int v=0)
        {
            value = v;
            printf("\n\n%i", value);
            printf("\nClass constructor triggered.");
        };

        // Copy-move constructor
        Test(Test&&)
        {
            printf("\nClass move-constructor triggered.");
        };

        // Destructor
        ~Test() 
        {
            value = 0;
            printf("\nClass desctructor triggered.");
        }
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<Test> container;

    container.push_back( Test(1) );
    container.push_back( Test(2) );
    container.push_back( Test(3) );
    container.push_back( Test(4) );

    printf("\n\nPushback complete!");
    return 0;
}
  • Because a copy is taken with push_back(). – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 9 '15 at 10:12
  • Since the vector holds objects, not pointers to them, your object will be copied on insert and then there are two objects to destroy. – Sami Kuhmonen Oct 9 '15 at 10:12
  • 2
    @πάνταῥεῖ: Answers go do there ↓↓↓↓↓ how many times do I have to tell you – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 9 '15 at 10:23
3

Because you don't print every constructor invocation, you're missing out on move-constructor call. Your class, apart from the default constructor you've provided, has also implicitly generated move and copy constructors.

The vector stores a value, and that value has to be initialized in some way. Typically, this happens either via a move c-tor or copy c-tor, altough an object might also be created directly inside of the vector using e.g. emplace_back.

Try adding this:

Test(Test&&)
{
    printf("\nClass move constructor triggered.");
};

to your class, it should change the output to something that makes more sense (I've also added a print at the end of main):

Live On Coliru

Class constructor triggered.
Class moveconstructor triggered.
Class desctructor triggered.
Out of main scope.
Class desctructor triggered.

The first destructor call destroys moved-out "empty" instance of your class, while the second one fires when the vector itself is destroyed.

5

Your vector contains a copy of the object you add to it through push_back(). The first destructor invocation is caused by the temporary you create being destroyed at the end of the full expression containing the call to push_back(). The second destructor is caused by the copy inside the vector being destroyed when the vector itself is destroyed.

You can convince yourself by adding a diagnostic to main():

int main()
{
    std::vector<Test> container;

    container.push_back( Test() );

    printf("\nThis is before the vector is destroyed...");

    return 0;
}

You can observe the output in this live example.

The copy which your vector contains is created by invoking the automatically-generated move constructor for your class (rather than using default construction), which is why you don't see a corresponding construction diagnostic.

If you defined your own move constructor (or copy constructor, as shown below) to emit a diagnostic, the output would be closer to what you'd expect:

    Test(Test const&)
    {
        printf("\nCopy construction triggered.");
    };

Again, live example.

2

The push_back() does not trigger any destructor (in this case).

The two calls to Test's destructor are:

1 - Because you pass a temporary to push_back(), so that object get destroyed when push_back() is done

2 - when the program end, so the vector get destroyed and so it is it's content

2

For the sake of simplicity, let's assume you are working with C++03, and move semantics are not available yet.

Add copy constructor to see that it is also triggered

Test(const Test&)
{
    printf("\nClass copy constructor triggered.");
};

Output

Class constructor triggered.
Class copy constructor triggered.
Class destructor triggered.
Class destructor triggered.

So, there are two objects constructed/destructed.

Roughly speaking, your code is equal to

int main()
{
    std::vector<Test> container;

    Test test;                    // first object created
    container.push_back(test);    // second object created by copying
    return 0;
}
  • 1
    It's really not the same, because he's passing the temporary directly to push_back. Since it has an rvalue-ref overload, a move constructor can be used. In your case, because you've defined a custom copy-ctor, implicit move-ctor isn't generated. – Bartek Banachewicz Oct 9 '15 at 10:21
  • @BartekBanachewicz why do you think it is c++11? – Stas Oct 9 '15 at 10:22
  • @Stas: The current year is 2015. We assume non-antiquated technology unless otherwise specified. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 9 '15 at 10:22
  • @Stas I don't think it's C++11. I think it's C++14 because that's the latest standard. – Bartek Banachewicz Oct 9 '15 at 10:23
  • @BartekBanachewicz ok, I've updated the answer to make it more explicit. – Stas Oct 9 '15 at 10:28

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