3

In Qt you can define the tab order by using the Qt Designer or by using C++. The relationships between widgets are set relatively to each other, so there is no index or such thing. What I want right now is to "break" the circular chain of widgets so that I get a beginning and an end of the chain.

A circular tab order would be:

A - B 
|   |
D - C

I want (note missing link between A and D):

A - B
    |
D - C

which is more like a line instead of a circle:

A - B - C - D

So the user "stops" at one end and has to go back using the other direction.


Update: I have another idea now. What if i reimplement:

bool QWidget::focusNextPrevChild(bool next)

According to the documentation one can use this to implement custom focus behavior.

In my dynamic scenario where buttons in the GUI are adjusted at run-time I will have to overload the function and set, for example, an internal flag allowFocusNext and allowFocusPrev which then ignores the focus request if necessary. I will report back here, when I have tried it. Meanwhile any comments are welcome!? :-)

2

I found a solution, but it is a bit hacky. The QWidget::setTabOrder will not allow to chain a widget with itself, so this approach won't help (even if you are using focus proxies)

However, you can define a "Focus Forwarder":

class FocusForwarder : public QWidget
{
public:
    explicit FocusForwarder(QWidget *proxy) :
        QWidget((QWidget *) proxy->parent()),
        m_proxy(proxy)
    {
        setFocusPolicy(Qt::TabFocus);
    }
protected:
    void focusInEvent(QFocusEvent *) {
        m_proxy->setFocus();
    }
private:
    QWidget *m_proxy;
};

And add them at the beginning and end of you chain:

FocusForwarder *w1 = new FocusForwarder(ui->bA);
FocusForwarder *w2 = new FocusForwarder(ui->bD);

QWidget::setTabOrder(w1, ui->bA);
QWidget::setTabOrder(ui->bA, ui->bB);
QWidget::setTabOrder(ui->bB, ui->bC);
QWidget::setTabOrder(ui->bC, ui->bD);
QWidget::setTabOrder(ui->bD, w2);

Details

For setTabOrder to work, the widgets must be in the same window. To ensure this, the Forwarder is placed in the proxy's parent (in the initializer list).

For this mechanism, the focus direction (Tab or Shit+Tab) does not matter. As soon as a FocusFowarder receives the focus, it will "forward" it to its proxy. The direction is handled by Qt internally. You just add "sentinels" around your chain.

Use in QtDesigner

When you want to use it in QtDesigner, you'd create a Widget and promote it to the forwarder. As you cannot set the proxy directly, you could add a dynamic property for the proxy's name, like this:

class FocusForwarderDesigner : public QWidget
{
    Q_OBJECT
    Q_PROPERTY(QString proxyName READ proxyName WRITE setProxyName)
public:
    QString proxyName() { 
        return (m_proxy) ? m_proxy->objectName() : QString::null; 
    }
    void setProxyName(QString name) {
       m_proxy = parent()->findChild<QWidget *>(name);
    }

    explicit FocusForwarderDesigner(QWidget *parent = NULL) :
        QWidget(parent) {}

protected:
    void focusInEvent(QFocusEvent *) {
        if (m_proxy) m_proxy->setFocus();
    }
private:
    QWidget *m_proxy;
}

In the designer, you would add a string-property with name proxyName and set it to the proxy's name. Don't forget to set the focus policy to Tab Focus in designer.

  • I have tried your approach and it works for static cases where the widgets are created once. In dynamic cases where hide() and show() is used to change the appearance of the UI, the FocusForwarder only works if its target is visible. I guess that Qt changes the focus chain internally when a widget is hidden. So when the last widget (pointing to the end-focus-forwarder) is hidden, Qt redirects the "next focus" as it wishes to the first widget, so it's circular again. I think there has to be a Qt-way of changing the circular to a linear behavior :-( – FrozenTarzan Oct 12 '15 at 6:40
0

After some additional thoughts I post an answer to my own question because it is a working solution but it is not ideal. Therefore, I'm still searching for a better one! As a note, my application mainly relies on mouse wheel interactions for changing the focus of widgets.

In my question I mentioned that overriding:

bool focusNextPrevChild(bool next)

could lead to a working system. The "receiving" widget would simply ignore the focus by returning "true" if it is marked as "last item" or "first item" and the "next" parameter would lead to a circular behavior. Although this works for the tab and space+tab key combinations, there are cases where focusNextPrevChild is not called explicitly. In my case it is not called for focus changes related to mouse wheel events.

What I do instead is overriding:

void wheelEvent(QWheelEvent* event)

This gives me direct control over all the focus events related to the mouse wheel. My overridden function looks like this:

void SelectionIconButton::wheelEvent(QWheelEvent* event)
{
    bool next = event->delta() > 0;

    if (m_IsLastInFocusChain && next) {
        event->accept();
        return;
    }

    if (m_IsFirstInFocusChain && !next) {
        event->accept();
        return;
    }

    QPushButton::wheelEvent(event);
}

So this system's requirements are:

  • Each widget has to somehow implement two bools and handle their state.
  • Each of those widgets has to be configured either at startup or in dynamic screens during appliation use
  • Listening only to wheelEvent does not allow me to handle tab key and space+tab key combinations

You see that this solution works but it involves some effort to apply it to a large application. I was thinking about a more general solution. Maybe a global list that is updated when a screen is changing. This global list would then somehow decide if a focus change is allowed or not. Unfortunately, this again is problematic with mouse wheel events because some widgets are "active" and the wheel event does not even want to change focus but alter the value in an input field, for example, instead.

Edit: I might have to add that the default implementation of QWidget::wheelEvent() and QPushButton::wheelEvent() and many more Qt-Widgets just ignore the event by setting event->ignore(). In my application all those ignored events are caught at a high level widget which then interprets the QWheelEvent and uses its delta to call focusPreNextChild() the right amount of time.

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