2

I am writing test code to verify a 3rd party API. The API consists of all types of commands, but for this discussion, let's look at a Boolean type of accessor like so:

// The code is simplified to explain the problem.
// Assume "Enable" does complex items like talking
// to a database, or complex calculations.
Blah item = new Blah();
item.GroupA.Enable = true;
item.GroupB.Enable = true;
// etc, say we have A LOT of "groups".

My current unit tests would look something like this:

public void GroupAEnable()
{
   bool val = true;
   mItem.GroupA.Enable = val;
   bool ret = mItem.GroupA.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);

   val = false;
   item.GroupA.Enable = val;
   ret = mItem.GroupA.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);
}

public void GroupBEnable()
{
   bool val = true;
   mItem.GroupB.Enable = val;
   bool ret = mItem.GroupB.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);

   val = false;
   mItem.GroupB.Enable = val;
   ret = mItem.GroupB.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);
}

I have to repeat this for hundreds of "groups".

In C++, we probably could have macro'd it and do something like this:

#define TEST_BOOL(cmd)       \
   bool val = true;          \
   mItem.##cmd## = val;      \
   bool ret = mItem.##cmd##; \
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);    \
   val = false;              \
   mItem.##cmd## = val;      \
   ret = mItem.##cmd##;      \
   VerifyEqual(val, ret)     

public void GroupAEnable()
{
   TEST_BOOL(GroupA.Enable);
}

public void GroupBEnable()
{
   TEST_BOOL(GroupB.Enable);
}

One C# solution is to create a TestBool function that accepts an Action, but that still requires a lot of typing for each group.

public void TestBool(Action setter, Action getter)
{
   ...
}

public void GroupAEnable()
{
   TestBool(x => mItem.GroupA.Enable = x,
            () => mItem.GroupA.Enable);
}

Any cool way to simplify this? The only thing different is the accessor name and type, while the test (i.e. test method) is the same.

8
  • Thats the necessary evil when dealing with poor design i guess. If its really just the name of a property that changes, why assume that behaviour differs? Also you could generate the code. – CSharpie Oct 9 '15 at 15:05
  • C# isn't C++. In fact, macros aren't very C++ either - they are severely frowned upon as they are a legacy of C. If you don't want to repeat code, extract it to a method. What you describe though is dynamic invocation which is already supported in C# using the dynamic keyword – Panagiotis Kanavos Oct 9 '15 at 15:07
  • Another C#/C++ option - use expressions or lambdas (both languages support them). That's how the assertions in most testing frameworks work – Panagiotis Kanavos Oct 9 '15 at 15:10
  • @Ryuu macros in C++ are really, really frowned upon. This specific usage would cause some heart attacks. What you are trying to do is bad practice in both languages. Just create an array of Func<> with the calls you want to make and call each one in a loop. – Panagiotis Kanavos Oct 9 '15 at 15:13
  • @PanagiotisKanavos yup, macros are frowned upon in C#, so I am looking for alternative. And by lambda, is it the same as my bottom-most code snippet? Anyway, "dynamic" is new for me ... I'll check it out. – Ryuu Oct 9 '15 at 15:13
3

Try using reflection to find and invoke the properties you're looking for.

Here's a quick and dirty sample that roughly does what you're trying to do:

public static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        NeedsTesting target = new NeedsTesting();

        DoTest( target );
    }

    private static void DoTest(NeedsTesting target)
    {
        Type type = typeof( NeedsTesting );
        PropertyInfo[] properties;
        int count = 0;

        properties = type.GetProperties();

        foreach( PropertyInfo property in properties )
        {
            if( property.Name.StartsWith( "Group" ) )
            {
                count++;
                TestProperty( target, property );
            }
        }

        if( count != 5 )
        {
            VerifyEquals( false, true, "Did not find all 5 properties to test" );
        }
    }

    private static void TestProperty( NeedsTesting target, PropertyInfo property )
    {
        bool result;

        property.SetValue( target, true );
        result = (bool)property.GetValue( target );
        VerifyEquals( result, true, string.Format("Property '{0}' failed to retain a 'true' value.", property.Name ) );

        property.SetValue( target, false );
        result = (bool)property.GetValue( target );
        VerifyEquals( result, false, string.Format( "Property '{0}' failed to retain a 'false' value.", property.Name ) );
    }

    private static void VerifyEquals( bool left, bool right, string message )
    {
        if( left != right )
        {
            throw new Exception(
                 string.Format(
                    "Unit test failed - values were not equal:\r\n" +
                    "   left: {0}\r\n" +
                    "  right: {1}\r\n" +
                    "Message:\r\n" +
                    "{2}",
                    left,
                    right,
                    message
                )
            );
        }
    }
}

public class NeedsTesting
{
    private bool groupEValue;

    public bool GroupA { get; set; }

    public bool GroupB { get; set; }

    public bool GroupC { get; set; }

    public bool GroupD { get; set; }

    public bool GroupE
    {
        get
        {
            return this.groupEValue;
        }
        set
        {
            // Oops, this one is broken.
            value = false;
        }
    }
}
3

Functions. Sometype may need to become a generic depending on your requirements:

void BoringTest(Sometype item)
{
   bool val = true;
   item.Enable = val;
   bool ret = item.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);
   val = false;
   item.Enable = val;
   ret =item.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);
}
public void GroupAEnable()
{
   BoringTest(mItem.GroupA);
}
public void GroupBEnable()
{
   BoringTest(mItem.GroupB);
}

Another option is to use reflection, if you don't bother about speed. Related: C# - Set Property of a Property with Reflection

dynamic uses reflection and may help you here but I'm not entirely sure. It has been a long time since I used it. Be aware that dynamic fails at runtime instead of compile time.

void BoringTest(object i)
{
   dynamic item = i;
   bool val = true;
   item.Enable = val;
   bool ret = item.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);
   val = false;
   item.Enable = val;
   ret =item.Enable;
   VerifyEqual(val, ret);
}
public void GroupAEnable()
{
   BoringTest(mItem.GroupA);
}
public void GroupBEnable()
{
   BoringTest(mItem.GroupB);
}

A third option is to use an intermediary, such as xml and xslt, or whatever your company fancies, for generation of entire test files.

4
  • Each group is a unique Interface, so I think that won't work. But I'll look at what Reflection is. Thanks! – Ryuu Oct 9 '15 at 15:17
  • Reflection allows you to input a string "GroupA" into the function, and the function then uses reflection to find the property GroupA on mItem. Details depend on the actual type of GroupA. – Peter Oct 9 '15 at 15:20
  • 1
    dynamic is a pretty nice way of doing it - basically the same as my answer, functionally, but a lot cleaner. – antiduh Oct 9 '15 at 15:43
  • Thanks Peter and @antiduh. Since speed is not crucial for me, looks like Reflection (and dynamic) would work for me, while the other suggestions (XML, Expressions) might come in handy in the future to handle other cases. – Ryuu Oct 9 '15 at 15:55
2

Here is an expression based approach:

public static void VerifyMemberEqualsValueAfterSetting<TValue>(
    Expression<Func<TValue>> memberExpression,
    TValue value)
{
    var member = (MemberExpression) memberExpression.Body;
    var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof (TValue));
    var assignExpresison = Expression.Assign(member, parameter);

    Expression.Lambda<Action<TValue>>(assignExpresison, parameter).Compile()(value);

    var after = Expression.Lambda<Func<TValue>>(member, null).Compile()();
    VerifyEqual(value,after);
}

Then use it like this:

VerifyMemberEqualsValueAfterSetting(()=> mItem.GroupA.Enabled, true);
VerifyMemberEqualsValueAfterSetting(()=> mItem.GroupA.Enabled, false);

Or even more boiled down:

public static void VerifyMemberEqualsValueAfterSetting<TValue>(
    Expression<Func<TValue>> memberExpression,
    params TValue[] values)
{
    var member = (MemberExpression) memberExpression.Body;
    var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof (TValue));
    var assignExpresison = Expression.Assign(member, parameter);

    var setter =Expression.Lambda<Action<TValue>>(assignExpresison, parameter).Compile();

    var getter = Expression.Lambda<Func<TValue>>(member, null).Compile();
    foreach(var value in values)
    {
         setter(value);
         VerifyEqual(value,getter(value));
    }
}

Then its possible to only write

VerifyMemberEqualsValueAfterSetting(()=> mItem.GroupA.Enabled, true, false);
VerifyMemberEqualsValueAfterSetting(()=> whatEver.Count, 1, 2, 3);
2
  • oh cool, you can make both a set and get from just one lambda. Thanks for exposing me to Expressions. – Ryuu Oct 9 '15 at 15:59
  • 1
    You are welcome, you can boil this down even more, Updated my answer. – CSharpie Oct 9 '15 at 16:01

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