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I have to make a program which asks the user to enter a student name, and their grade, for every student. And put them as [keys] and [values] in a dictionary. And when the user enters 'q' the program quits and then prints the students and their grades such as this:

Student Grade
Student1 A
Student2 B
Student3 C

My code looks like this:

student_grades = {}

while True:

    ## Get the Name [key in dictionary] of the student
    name = raw_input("Please give me the name of the student (press q to quit): \n")

    if name == 'q':
        print "Okay, printing grades! \n"
        for x in student_grades:
            print student_grades.keys() + student_grades.values()
        break

    # Chcek if name isn't valid
    elif name.isdigit():
        print "Sorry, {} isn't valid".format(name)
        name = raw_input("Please give me the name of the student (press q to quit): \n")

    ## Get the grade [value in dictionary] of the student
    grade = raw_input("Please give me their grade: (e.g 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'F') \n")

    # Check if grade isn't valid
    if not grade in ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'F']:
        print "Sorry, {} isn't valid".format(grade)
        grade = raw_input("Please give me their grade: (e.g 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'F') \n")
        # Assign Name to Grade
        student_grades[name] = grade

When I enter 'q' the program should print the keys and values which are the student name and their grade, but it prints nothing

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  • please fix the indentation in your original question, as written this isn't valid code Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 15:50
  • How is my code not indented right? please can you specify where exactly i should fix it? Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 15:58
  • if I know exactly what needed fixing I'd fix it myself. You don't have a level of indentation inside the while True: though, idk what else is wrong Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 16:01
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    the bigger issue is that you're dumping all of the code when most of it isn't relevant to your problem. Have you tried creating a simple dictionary and printing it outside of the context of this program? If not then why not? Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 16:02
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    Right, but you can't expect to write an entire program and then say "something is wrong somewhere." You have to cut out pieces and make sure you know how they work before trying to put them all together. So again, try writing a program that makes a simple dictionary and prints it. Here I'll get you started d = {'key1': 100, 'key2': 42, 'key3': 69} Commented Oct 9, 2015 at 16:14

1 Answer 1

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You can access the keys and values of a dictionary like this:

for k, v in mydict.iteritems():
    print(k, v)

In Python 3 this is changed/bettered to:

for k, v in mydict.items():
    print(k, v)

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