42

Is there any way to test if a selector would match a given DOM Element? Preferably, without the use of an external library like Sizzle. This is for a library and I would like to minimize the amount of third party plugins required for the "core" library. If it ends up requiring Sizzle I'll just add that as a plugin to the library for those who want the feature it would enable.

For example, I would be able to do something like:

var element = <input name="el" />

matches("input[name=el]", element) == true

EDIT: After thinking about it more, I came up with a solution, this technically works, but it doesn't seem optimal in terms of efficiency:

function matchesSelector(selector, element) { 
    var nodeList = document.querySelectorAll(selector); 
    for ( var e in nodeList ) {
        return nodeList[e] === element; 
    }
    return false; 
}

Basically the function queries the entire document with the given selector, and then it iterates over the nodeList. If the given element is in the nodeList, then it returns true, and if it isn't it will return false.

If anyone can come up with a more efficient answer I would gladly mark their response as the answer.

EDIT: Flavius Stef pointed me towards a browser specific solution for Firefox 3.6+, mozMatchesSelector. I also found the equivalent for Chrome (version compatibility unknown, and it may or may not work on Safari or other webkit browsers): webkitMatchesSelector, which is basically the same as the Firefox implementation. I have not found any native implementation for the IE browsers yet.

For the above example, the usage would be:

element.(moz|webkit)MatchesSelector("input[name=el]")

It seems the W3C has also addressed this in the Selectors API Level 2 (still a draft at this moment) specification. matchesSelector will be a method on DOM Elements once approved.

W3C Usage: element.matchesSelector(selector)

Since that specification is still a draft and there is a lag time before popular browsers implement the methods once it becomes the standard, it may be a while until this actually usable. Good news is, if you use any of the popular frameworks, chances are they probably implement this functionality for you without having to worry about cross browser compatibility. Although that doesn't help those of us who can't include third party libraries.

Frameworks or libraries that implement this functionality:

http://www.prototypejs.org/api/element/match

http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/docs/YAHOO.util.Selector.html

http://docs.jquery.com/Traversing/is

http://extjs.com/deploy/dev/docs/output/Ext.DomQuery.html#Ext.DomQuery-methods

http://base2.googlecode.com/svn/doc/base2.html#/doc/!base2.DOM.Element.matchesSelector

http://wiki.github.com/jeresig/sizzle/

6
  • 1
    I can't imagine how you'd do this - assuming you want to support a broad range of selectors, or all CSS2 or 3 selectors - without getting awful close to reimplementing Sizzle anyway. Because that's already optimized and debugged, why not just use it?
    – Pointy
    Jul 21, 2010 at 23:25
  • 1
    @Pointy: I was hoping there was a way to do it "natively" with the built in selector engine in modern browsers (via querySelector and querySelectorAll). If not, like I said, I will resort to using a library but delegate this feature to a plugin so Sizzle isn't required for my "core" library. Jul 21, 2010 at 23:32
  • 2
    Firefox 3.6 has Node.mozMatchesSelector(): developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/Node.mozMatchesSelector Jul 21, 2010 at 23:54
  • 1
    @Flavius Stef: It doesn't look like there's any cross browser way to do it yet, but thanks for the link, I followed it to the W3C's level 2 specification to find that they have addressed this, so it's only a matter of the spec being finalized and browsers implementing it. If you add more information about the inclusion of the matchesSelector method in the "W3C Selectors API Level 2 (First Draft)" in your own response I will mark it as the answer. If not, I will edit it into my post. Jul 22, 2010 at 0:09
  • Using Modernizr, you can do Modernizr.prefixed('MatchesSelector,element) to obtain a function (if it exists) with the correct (or no) vendor prefix, which can then be used as fn && fn(selector).
    – user663031
    Oct 29, 2012 at 8:40

7 Answers 7

43

For the benefit of those visiting this page after lo these many years, this functionality is now implemented in all modern browsers as element.matches without vendor prefix (except for ms for MS browsers other than Edge 15, and webkit for Android/KitKat). See http://caniuse.com/matchesselector.

2
  • this is disgrace by edge Mar 25, 2016 at 10:44
  • 1
    Works. Try in your console: document.body.matches('.question-page')
    – vsync
    Jul 9, 2017 at 9:40
9

For best performance, use the browser implementations ((moz|webkit|o|ms)matchesSelector) where possible. When you can't do that, here is a manual implementation.

An important case to consider is testing selectors for elements not attached to the document.

Here's an approach that handles this situation. If it turns out the the element in question is not attached to the document, crawl up the tree to find the highest ancestor (the last non-null parentNode) and drop that into a DocumentFragment. Then from that DocumentFragment call querySelectorAll and see if the your element is in the resulting NodeList.

Here is the code.

The document

Here's a document structure we'll be working with. We'll grab the .element and test whether it matches the selectors li and .container *.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <body>
    <article class="container">
      <section>
        <h1>Header 1</h1>
        <ul>
          <li>one</li>
          <li>two</li>
          <li>three</li>
        </ul>
      </section>
      <section>
        <h1>Header 2</h1>
        <ul>
          <li>one</li>
          <li>two</li>
          <li class="element">three</li>
        </ul>
      </section>
      <footer>Footer</footer>
    </article>
  </body>
</html>

Searching with document.querySelectorAll

Here is a matchesSelector function that uses document.querySelectorAll.

// uses document.querySelectorAll
function matchesSelector(selector, element) {
  var all = document.querySelectorAll(selector);
  for (var i = 0; i < all.length; i++) {
    if (all[i] === element) {
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}

This works as long as that element is in the document.

// this works because the element is in the document
console.log("Part 1");
var element = document.querySelector(".element");
console.log(matchesSelector("li", element)); // true
console.log(matchesSelector(".container *", element)); // true

However, it fails if the element is removed from the document.

// but they don't work if we remove the article from the document
console.log("Part 2");
var article = document.querySelector("article");
article.parentNode.removeChild(article);
console.log(matchesSelector("li", element)); // false
console.log(matchesSelector(".container *", element)); // false

Searching within a DocumentFragment

The fix requires searching whatever subtree that element happens to be in. Here's an updated function named matchesSelector2.

// uses a DocumentFragment if element is not attached to the document
function matchesSelector2(selector, element) {
  if (document.contains(element)) {
    return matchesSelector(selector, element);
  }
  var node = element;
  var root = document.createDocumentFragment();
  while (node.parentNode) {
    node = node.parentNode;
  }
  root.appendChild(node);
  var all = root.querySelectorAll(selector);
  for (var i = 0; i < all.length; i++) {
    if (all[i] === element) {
      root.removeChild(node);
      return true;
    }
  }
  root.removeChild(node);
  return false;
}

Now we see that matchesSelector2 works even though the element is in a subtree that is detached from the document.

// but they will work if we use matchesSelector2
console.log("Part 3");
console.log(matchesSelector2("li", element)); // true
console.log(matchesSelector2(".container *", element)); // true

You can see this working at jsfiddle.

Putting it all together

Here's the final implementation I came up with:

function is(element, selector) {
  var node = element;
  var result = false;
  var root, frag;

  // crawl up the tree
  while (node.parentNode) {
    node = node.parentNode;
  }

  // root must be either a Document or a DocumentFragment
  if (node instanceof Document || node instanceof DocumentFragment) {
    root = node;
  } else {
    root = frag = document.createDocumentFragment();
    frag.appendChild(node);
  }

  // see if selector matches
  var matches = root.querySelectorAll(selector);
  for (var i = 0; i < matches.length; i++) {
    if (this === matches.item(i)) {
      result = true;
      break;
    }
  }

  // detach from DocumentFragment and return result
  while (frag && frag.firstChild) {
    frag.removeChild(frag.firstChild);
  }
  return result;
}

An important note is that jQuery's is implementation is much faster. The first optimization I would look into is avoiding crawling up the tree if we don't have to. To do this you could look at the right-most part of the selector and test whether this matches the element. However, beware that if the selector is actually multiple selectors separated by commas, then you'll have to test each one. At this point you're building a CSS selector parser, so you might as well use a library.

5

In the absence of xMatchesSelector, I'm thinking to try adding a style with the requested selector to a styleSheet object, along with some arbitrary rule and value that is not likely to be already in use. Then check the computed/currentStyle of the element to see if it has inherited the added CSS rule. Something like this for IE:

function ieMatchesSelector(selector, element) {
  var styleSheet = document.styleSheets[document.styleSheets.length-1];

  //arbitrary value, probably should first check 
  //on the off chance that it is already in use
  var expected = 91929;

  styleSheet.addRule(selector, 'z-index: '+expected+' !important;', -1);

  var result = element.currentStyle.zIndex == expected;

  styleSheet.removeRule(styleSheet.rules.length-1);

  return result;
}

There's probably a handbag full of gotcha's with this method. Probably best to find some obscure proprietary CSS rule that is less likely to have a visual effect than z-index, but since it is removed almost immediately after it is set, a brief flicker should be the only side effect if that. Also a more obscure rule will be less likely to be overridden by a more specific selector, style attribute rules, or other !important rules (if IE even supports that). Anyway, worth a try at least.

2
  • Interesting solution! Have you tried doing this? Does it work efficiently?
    – Venkat D.
    Mar 19, 2012 at 14:28
  • Clever solution, but it only works for elements currently attached to the document.
    – Chris Calo
    Jan 12, 2013 at 18:52
3

The W3C selectors API (http://www.w3.org/TR/selectors-api/) specifies document.querySelectorAll(). This is not supported on all browsers, so you'd have to google the ones that do support it: http://www.google.com/search?q=browsers+implementing+selector+api

3
  • Thanks for the reply. I'm already using querySelectorAll, but it doesn't let you choose what elements it will test on. It selects from the whole document. Jul 21, 2010 at 23:29
  • The spec contains this example, so you probably could use it like element.querySelectorAll(): var div = document.getElementById("bar"); var p = div.querySelector("body p"); Jul 21, 2010 at 23:34
  • Unfortunately that only selects from the element's descendants/children, not the element itself. So far the only thing I can come up with is run the selector on the whole document, and iterate through the results to see if my element is in the NodeList. Sounds awfully inefficient though. Jul 21, 2010 at 23:42
1

I'm dealing with this issue now. I have to support IE8 with native Javascript, which presents a curious challenge: IE8 supports both querySelector and querySelectorAll, but not matchesSelector. If your situation is similar, here's an option for you to consider:

When you're handed the DOM node and a selector, make a shallow copy of the node as well as its parent. This will preserve all of their attributes but won't make copies of their respective children.

Attach the cloned node to the cloned parent. Use querySelector on the cloned parent -- the only thing it needs to search is the only child node it has so this process is constant time. It will either return the child node or it won't.

That'd look something like this:

function matchesSelector(node, selector)
{
   var dummyNode = node.cloneNode(false);
   var dummyParent = node.parent.cloneNode(false);
   dummyParent.appendChild(dummyNode);
   return dummyNode === dummyParent.querySelector(selector);
}

It may be worth creating a complete chain of shallow-copied parents all the way up to the root node and querying the (mostly empty) dummy root if you'd like to be able to test your node's relationship to its ancestors.

Off the top of my head I'm not sure what portion of selectors this would work for, but I think it'd do nicely for any that didn't worry about the tested node's children. YMMV.

-- EDIT --

I decided to write the function to shallow copy everything from the node being tested to root. Using this, a lot more selectors are employable. (Nothing related to siblings, though.)

function clonedToRoot(node)
{
    dummyNode = node.cloneNode(false);
    if(node.parentNode === document)
    {
        return {'root' : dummyNode, 'leaf' : dummyNode};
    }
    parent = clonedToRoot(node.parentNode).root;
    parent.appendChild(dummyNode);
    return {'root' : parent, 'leaf' : dummyNode};
}

function matchesSelector(node, selector)
{
    testTree = clonedToRoot(node)
    return testTree.leaf === testTree.root.querySelector(selector)
}

I'd welcome an expert to explain what kinds of selectors there are that this wouldn't cover!

-1

Modern browsers can do it with the document.querySelectorAll function.

http://www.w3.org/TR/selectors-api/

1
  • 1
    That is not the question. The OP has an element, and wants to know if it matches a particular selector.
    – user663031
    Sep 5, 2016 at 13:38
-3

Just use an id for your element? HTML-IDs have to be unique…

1
  • It's for a library, so I don't know what specifically they will be using it for. Matching only by ID would be virtually useless in the context of the library (a form validation library). Jul 21, 2010 at 23:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.