4

I'm reading in lines of text, and creating a list of its unique words (after lowercasing them). I can make this work with flatMap, but can't make it work with a map's "sub" stream. The flatMap seems more concise and "better", but why does distinct work in one context but not the other?

Class top:

import static java.util.stream.Collectors.toList;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class GetListOfAllWordsInLinesOfText {

   private static final String INPUT = "Line 1\n" +
                              "Line 2, which is a really long line\n" +
                              "A moderately long line 3\n" +
                              "Line 4\n";
   private static final Pattern WORD_SEPARATOR_PATTERN = Pattern.compile("\\W+");

   public static void main(String[] args) {

Why does this distinct allow duplicates through:

      final List<String> wordList = new ArrayList<>();
      Arrays.stream(INPUT.split("\n"))
            .forEach(line -> WORD_SEPARATOR_PATTERN.splitAsStream(line).
                        map(String::toLowerCase)
                        distinct().
                        forEach(wordList::add));

      System.out.println("Output via map:");
      wordList.stream().forEach(System.out::println);

      System.out.println("--------");

Output:

Output via map:
line
1
line
2
which
is
a
really
long
a
moderately
long
line
3
line
4

But this correctly eliminates duplicates?

      final List<String> wordList2 = Arrays.stream(INPUT.split("\n")).flatMap(
            WORD_SEPARATOR_PATTERN::splitAsStream).map(String::toLowerCase).
            distinct()
            .collect(toList());

      System.out.println("Output via flatMap:");
      wordList2.stream().forEach(System.out::println);
   }
}

Output:

line
1
2
which
is
a
really
long
moderately
3
4

Here's the full output, including the below peeks. You can see the duplicates being correctly filtered by the flatMap version, but not the map version:

map:

map before distinct -> line
map after distinct -> line
map before distinct -> 1
map after distinct -> 1
map before distinct -> line
map after distinct -> line
map before distinct -> 2
map after distinct -> 2
map before distinct -> which
map after distinct -> which
map before distinct -> is
map after distinct -> is
map before distinct -> a
map after distinct -> a
map before distinct -> really
map after distinct -> really
map before distinct -> long
map after distinct -> long
map before distinct -> line
map before distinct -> a
map after distinct -> a
map before distinct -> moderately
map after distinct -> moderately
map before distinct -> long
map after distinct -> long
map before distinct -> line
map after distinct -> line
map before distinct -> 3
map after distinct -> 3
map before distinct -> line
map after distinct -> line
map before distinct -> 4
map after distinct -> 4
Output via map:
line
1
line
2
which
is
a
really
long
a
moderately
long
line
3
line
4
--------

flatMap:

flatMap before distinct -> line
flatMap after distinct -> line
flatMap before distinct -> 1
flatMap after distinct -> 1
flatMap before distinct -> line
flatMap before distinct -> 2
flatMap after distinct -> 2
flatMap before distinct -> which
flatMap after distinct -> which
flatMap before distinct -> is
flatMap after distinct -> is
flatMap before distinct -> a
flatMap after distinct -> a
flatMap before distinct -> really
flatMap after distinct -> really
flatMap before distinct -> long
flatMap after distinct -> long
flatMap before distinct -> line
flatMap before distinct -> a
flatMap before distinct -> moderately
flatMap after distinct -> moderately
flatMap before distinct -> long
flatMap before distinct -> line
flatMap before distinct -> 3
flatMap after distinct -> 3
flatMap before distinct -> line
flatMap before distinct -> 4
flatMap after distinct -> 4
Output via flatMap:
line
1
2
which
is
a
really
long
moderately
3
4

Full code:

import static java.util.stream.Collectors.toList;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class GetListOfAllWordsInLinesOfText {

   private static final String INPUT = "Line 1\n" +
                              "Line 2, which is a really long line\n" +
                              "A moderately long line 3\n" +
                              "Line 4\n";
   private static final Pattern WORD_SEPARATOR_PATTERN = Pattern.compile("\\W+");

   public static void main(String[] args) {

      final List<String> wordList = new ArrayList<>();
      Arrays.stream(INPUT.split("\n"))
            .forEach(line -> WORD_SEPARATOR_PATTERN.splitAsStream(line).map(String::toLowerCase)
                  .peek(word -> System.out.println("map before distinct -> " + word)).
                        distinct().
                        peek(word -> System.out.println("map after distinct -> " + word)).
                        forEach(wordList::add));

      System.out.println("Output via map:");
      wordList.stream().forEach(System.out::println);

      System.out.println("--------");

      final List<String> wordList2 = Arrays.stream(INPUT.split("\n")).flatMap(
            WORD_SEPARATOR_PATTERN::splitAsStream).map(String::toLowerCase).
                  peek(word -> System.out.println("flatMap before distinct -> " + word)).
            distinct()
                  .peek(word -> System.out.println("flatMap after distinct -> " + word))
            .collect(toList());

      System.out.println("Output via flatMap:");
      wordList2.stream().forEach(System.out::println);
   }
}
6

The first code snippet uses forEach to process each line, and distinct within this forEach - so the duplicities are eliminated, but only within a line, not globally.

See the output for second line, the repeated occurence of 'line' is actually eliminated since it is repeated on the same line.

  • Now that you say it, it's obvious. Don't know what what was stopping me from seeing it before. Thank you. – aliteralmind Oct 9 '15 at 20:59

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