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I have a view that I'm trying to re-use for two different actions to display data from the database. For one of those actions, an Eloquent collection object is passed to the view, and data is retrieved with

@foreach($buildings as $key=>$value)
        {!! $value->build_name !!}

Obviously 'build_name' is a column in the table. So far simple..

Now I need this same view to display data that requires a lot of processing and it's not possible to generate an eloquent statement to pass to the view.

In order to re-use the $value->build_name code, I'm assuming I have to still pass an object (model??) to the view.

I have a Building.php Model

class Building extends Model
{
    protected $fillable =[
        'buildingtype_id',
        'build_name',
    ];

and I'm thinking I could just add public $build_name; to the Building model, but then I should also add a method to set and get the $build_name. So my Building Model will now look like..

class Building extends Model
{

    public $build_name;

    protected $fillable =[
        'buildingtype_id',
        'build_name',
    ];

    public function getBuildName () {
        return $this->build_name;
    }

    public function setBuildName ($name) {
        $this->build_name =  $name;
    }

And I can just create the object myself in the controller...

If I do this, is {!! $value->build_name !!} still appropiate for the view? Or should I now be using {!! $value->getBuildName() !!}

Or am I missing a key concept somewhere? I'm still new to Laravel and OOP.

Edit I just implemented this, and it's not working. If I add the public $build_name attribute to the model, getBuildName does not return anything, however if I remove public $build_name it does... (which would break my attempting to create that object manually)

  • Can you explain why you want to modify this Eloquent model in that way? – Ahmad Baktash Hayeri Oct 11 '15 at 4:44
  • I don't quite understand the question. But I want to reuse code that accepts an eloquent model object. The problem is that reusing the code means passing on an object that is created manually. I'm not sure if I should try to pass in a manually instantiated model, or create a new class that is similar to the eloquent model.... (make sense?) – dangel Oct 11 '15 at 5:09
  • Can you give a hint on this part of your question? Now I need this same view to display data that requires a lot of processing and it's not possible to generate an eloquent statement to pass to the view., that's what I meant. – Ahmad Baktash Hayeri Oct 11 '15 at 5:45
  • I have a view that I want to re-use, as the only difference in 2 different actions of my code are 1) retrieve data as it from the DB and send it to the view, which expects an eloquent object to properly display things such as {!! $value->build_name !!} .2) the 2nd action is the view also receives data that did not originate from a DB (but is of the same structure), and therefore I have no eloquent object to pass, though I'd like to re-use the code in the view. I think what I need is to create another class that is similar to the Model? – dangel Oct 12 '15 at 0:22
1

When you declare public $build_name, this will override (or more precisely, reset) any other field with the same name in the model. So, you'll have to call setBuildName() setter method before you get it.

I just implemented this, and it's not working. If I add the public $build_name attribute to the model, getBuildName does not return anything

That's because you've called the getter method before the setter, so there is nothing (null) set in the public variable $build_name.

Although you haven't quite mentioned why exactly you want to reuse the Eloquent model, but you can achieve your desired purpose with a little tweak on the model's setter methods:

class Building extends Model
{
/* ... */

   public function setBuildName ($name) {
      $this->build_name =  $name; 
      return $this;    
   }
}

Notice returning the current object ($this) in case you would want to chain multiple setter methods in one go.

e.g.:

$model->setBuildName('some name')->setBuildHeight(400);

UPDATE

You can use the default eloquent model to serve your purpose (hence, ridding you of making a duplicate class to achieve roughly the same effect).

Now suppose you have your model Building and would like to set it's attributes manually, then, the following operation on the model is still appropriate:

$building = new App\Building();

$building->build_name = 'Some Building Name';   // you can substitute this with your setter method as well
$building->build_height = 110;  // assuming you have a column named `build_height` in your model's table

Note that the only difference in what you'd be doing here is:

  1. You DON'T declare public variables at all in the Eloquent model.
  2. You don't call Eloquent's save() method on the model to persist the manually set data (giving it a transient behavior).

The model now is totally eligible to be passed to your view and you can access it's attributes as you would with a regular model:

<!-- in your view -->
{{ $building->build_name }}
{{ $building->build_height }}

As an alternative approach to setting your arbitrary data, you can have a single setter which accepts an array of key value data to be stored in the model (e.g. ['build_name' => 'Building Name', 'build_height' => 110]):

//in class Building

public function setData($data){
   $this->build_name = $data['build_name'];
   $this->build_height = $data['build_height'];
}

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