170

In CoffeeScript, this is straightforward:

coffee> a = ['a', 'b', 'program']
[ 'a', 'b', 'program' ]
coffee> [_..., b] = a
[ 'a', 'b', 'program' ]
coffee> b
'program'

Does ES6 allow for something similar?

> const [, b] = [1, 2, 3]
'use strict'
> b  // it got the second element, not the last one!
2
> const [...butLast, last] = [1, 2, 3]
SyntaxError: repl: Unexpected token (1:17)
> 1 | const [...butLast, last] = [1, 2, 3]
    |                  ^
    at Parser.pp.raise (C:\Users\user\AppData\Roaming\npm\node_modules\babel\node_modules\babel-core\node_modules\babylon\lib\parser\location.js:24:13)

Of course I can do it the ES5 way -

const a = b[b.length - 1]

But maybe this is a bit prone to off-by-one errors. Can the splat only be the last thing in the destructuring?

6
  • 36
    @FelixKling the question is in particular about the behavior of ... in es6, particularly that it can only be used as the last thing when destructuring or in a parameter list. This is potentially counterintuitive to someone coming into es6 from coffeescript and thus this question is potentially useful. Oct 12, 2015 at 18:28
  • 1
    That means besides [1,2,3].slice(-1) you even can't destructure equivalent to [1,2,3].slice(0, -1). These are common operations. ES6 destructuring is somehow a joke!
    – user5536315
    Jun 4, 2016 at 6:04
  • @Iven there is a legitimate reason - to handle infinite iterables. Jun 16, 2016 at 5:20
  • Too bad rest as first parameter doesn't work. Would have been cool... Here is a jsperf using some of the answers jsperf.com/destructure-last/1
    – Shanimal
    Aug 11, 2017 at 14:30
  • 2
    There’s a TC39 proposal called Double-Ended Iterator and Destructuring that links to this question. Oct 19, 2020 at 16:06

19 Answers 19

265

console.log('last', [1, 3, 4, 5].slice(-1));
console.log('second_to_last', [1, 3, 4, 5].slice(-2));

7
  • 11
    Nice simple non-mutative solution.
    – Jack Steam
    Sep 6, 2017 at 16:48
  • 2
    @Shanimal Depends, I'm getting the pop version as faster (OS X, Chrome 68). Aug 20, 2018 at 18:39
  • 3
    @Dave Newton But pop() cause mutation Aug 29, 2018 at 22:22
  • 1
    @AntonioPantano Yes, it mutates the copy. Point was whether or not it's faster isn't a given. Aug 29, 2018 at 23:10
  • 3
    to return the value 'program' and not ['program'] use ['a','b','program'].slice(-1)[0]. for empty array this will return undefined
    – oriadam
    Dec 21, 2020 at 9:42
76

I believe ES6 could at least help with that:

[...arr].pop()

Given your array (arr) is not undefined and an iterable element (yes, even strings work!!), it should return the last element..even for the empty array and it doesn't alter it either. It creates an intermediate array though..but that should not cost much.

Your example would then look like this:

  console.log(  [...['a', 'b', 'program']].pop() );

10
  • 8
    uhh, it's quite bad, even .slice(-1)[0] is slighly less bad, or var [last]=arr.slice().reverse() is another ugly one if you need
    – caub
    Aug 8, 2016 at 21:49
  • 10
    I thought this post was about ES6/ES2015, no? But I like especially your last piece. How about combining the two: var [last] = arr.slice(-1) ;)
    – shoesel
    Sep 2, 2016 at 12:04
  • 14
    my favorite way is Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, -1, { get() {return this[this.length - 1] } }); [1,2,3][-1]
    – caub
    Sep 2, 2016 at 17:19
  • 4
    Although this works it's mutative and removes the item from the original array. Not ideal in many scenarios. Nov 27, 2017 at 4:24
  • 6
    @GavKilbride it doesn't. Example is the same as [].concat(arr).pop(); which doesn't mutate arr.
    – Dan
    Aug 29, 2018 at 15:55
62

It is not possible in ES6/2015. The standard just doesn't provide for it.

As you can see in the spec, the FormalParameterList can either be:

  • a FunctionRestParameter
  • a FormalsList (a list of parametes)
  • a FormalsList, followed by a FunctionRestParameter

Having FunctionRestParameter followed by parameters is not provided.

0
62

You can destructure the reversed array to get close to what you want.

const [a, ...rest] = ['a', 'b', 'program'].reverse();
  
document.body.innerHTML = 
    "<pre>"
    + "a: " + JSON.stringify(a) + "\n\n"
    + "rest: " + JSON.stringify(rest.reverse())
    + "</pre>";

4
  • 3
    Smart. Better than const last = ['bbb', 'uuu', 'iii'].slice(-1); ? In terms of performances? Jan 25, 2017 at 10:00
  • 3
    the .slice(-1) is technically faster, but it does not give you both the last item AND the subarray in one call, which is a benefit of the ... splat when destructuring. Performance hit of reversing twice is to be considered when used on longer arrays, but for a small script probably worth the convenience? But you could just as easily let a = array.slice(-1), rest = array.slice(0,array.length-2) if you still wanted the oneliner in ES5, that is ~4% faster. jsperf.com/last-array-splat
    – mix3d
    Nov 2, 2018 at 18:22
  • this is quite clever :D
    – ncubica
    Apr 10, 2022 at 2:02
  • 2
    This solution still mutates the original array , which is not ideal in real life scenarios.
    – Mg Gm
    Apr 21, 2022 at 14:26
47

Another approach is:

const arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
const { length, [length - 1]: last } = arr; // Should be 5
console.log(last)

3
  • You don’t have to catch the length. ...rest would be more useful. May 12, 2021 at 9:52
  • @КонстантинВан true, it's common, mine is rare, but trully useful
    – Den Kerny
    Jun 4, 2021 at 12:46
  • This is a gem @DenKerny ! Aug 23, 2022 at 15:25
10

You can try using object destructuring applied to an array to extract the length and then get last item: e.g.:

const { length, 0: first, [length - 1]: last } = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']

// length = 4
// first = 'a'
// last = 'd'

UPDATE

Another approach Array.prototype.at()

The at() method takes an integer value and returns the item at that index, allowing for positive and negative integers...

const last = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'].at(-1)
// 'd'
2
  • 1
    I really think this is the best way to do it for now (mid 2022) Thanks a lot!
    – Amir Arad
    Aug 5, 2022 at 6:54
  • at() is more convenient because it returns the element, whereas slice() returns an array.
    – pmont
    Sep 9, 2023 at 19:21
8

Getting the last element of the array:

const [last,] = ['a', 'b', 'program'].reverse();
2
  • 1
    I must add that JavaScript Array reverse is done in-place. So this solution might not suit every person, and/or have performance issues. I've been burned...
    – Shane Hsu
    Jun 4, 2021 at 9:44
  • Basically the same as this solution. It still has the same problem of mutating the array.
    – VLAZ
    May 6, 2022 at 11:05
8

It is not necessarily the most performant way of doing it. But depending on the context, a quite elegant way would be:

const myArray = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
const theOneIWant = [...myArray].pop();

console.log(theOneIWant); // 'three'
console.log(myArray.length); // 3

4
  • 5
    I don't see any elegance in this solution, but anyway @shoesel already posted it
    – Bergi
    Nov 1, 2017 at 2:29
  • 2
    how personal taste differs ;) I like it Aug 23, 2022 at 15:02
  • In what way is it elegant? Nov 9, 2023 at 1:48
  • OK, the OP has left the building: "Last seen more than 6 years ago" Nov 9, 2023 at 1:49
6

This should work:

const [lastone] = myArray.slice(-1);
5

const arr = ['a', 'b', 'c']; // => [ 'a', 'b', 'c' ]

const {
  [arr.length - 1]: last
} = arr;

console.log(last); // => 'c'

1
  • 3
    Yes, I find it useful when already doing other destructuring. By itself it is not as easy to read as the classic solution.
    – andrhamm
    Nov 8, 2019 at 15:27
2

This is not the destructuring way, but it could help. According to JavaScript documentation and the reverse method, one could be trying this:

const reversed = array1.reverse();
let last_item = reversed[0]
1
  • There is no advantage at all to use reverse(). It takes unnecessary time and it mutates the array which is most likely also unnecessary. With mutation .pop() should be the idiomatic way to get the last item. Without mutation it's arr[arr.length - 1]
    – VLAZ
    May 6, 2022 at 11:08
1

You could further destruct array´s ...rest array as Object, in order to get its length prop and build a computed prop name for the last index.

This even works for parameter destruction:

const a = [1, 2, 3, 4];

// Destruct from array ---------------------------
const [A_first, ...{length: l, [l - 1]: A_Last}] = a;
console.log('A: first: %o; last: %o', A_first, A_Last);     // A: first: 1; last: 4

// Destruct from fn param(s) ---------------------
const fn = ([B_first, ...{length: l, [l - 1]: B_Last}]) => {
  console.log('B: first: %o; last: %o', B_first, B_Last);   // B: first: 1; last: 4
};

fn(a);

1

const arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]; arr[arr.length - 1] = 6;

// => [1, 2, 3, 4, 6]

1

Does ES6 allow for something similar?

No, it is currently not possible, although we may get it in the future, see:

So what can we do in the meantime?

We want:

const [...rest, last] = arr;

For the time being, probably the cleanest approach is:

const arr = [1, 2, 3];

const [rest, last] = [arr.slice(0, -1), arr.at(-1)];

console.log({ rest, last });

which logs: { rest: [ 1, 2 ], last: 3 } and arr is unchanged. It does not create unnecessary copies or intermediate arrays.

Note that .at() is fairly new (as of writing):

Another approach that does not use arr.at(-1):

const arr = [1, 2, 3];

const rest = [...arr];
const last = rest.pop(); // <-- this mutates rest

console.log({ rest, last });

which logs: { rest: [ 1, 2 ], last: 3 } and arr is unchanged since we made a shallow copy first. It does not create unnecessary copies of arr or intermediate arrays either. However, I do not like the fact that rest is mutated.

If backward compatibility is important, this works even in ES3:

var arr = [1, 2, 3];

var rest = arr.slice();
var last = rest.pop(); // <-- this mutates rest

console.log({ rest: rest, last: last });

It is not as elegant as const [...rest, last] = arr;, but the code is readable and straightforward in my opinion.

0

This is the most simple and understandable one I could actually come up with:

    const first = [...arr];
    const last = first.pop();
    const others = first.join(', ');
-1
let a = [1,2,3]
let [b] = [...a].reverse()
-1

Using array deconstructing: "capturing" the array, "spliced" array (arrMinusEnd), and "poped"/"sliced" element (endItem).

var [array, arrMinusEnd, endItem] = 
  ["one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine", "ten"]
  .reduce(
    (acc, cv, idx, arr) => {
      if(idx<arr.length-1) acc[1].push(cv);
      else {
        acc[0]=arr;
        acc[2]=cv;
      };
      return acc;
    },
    [null,[],[]]
  )
;

console.log("array=");
console.log(array);
console.log("arrMinusEnd=");
console.log(arrMinusEnd);
console.log("endItem=\""+endItem+"\"");
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

-1

Very simple one,

const arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
const last = arr.at(-1);
console.log(last);
-1

Definitely, the question is about destructuring for JavaScript arrays, and we know it is not possible to have the last item of an array by using the destructuring assignment, but there is a way to do it immutable. See the following:

const arr = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'last'];

~~~
const arrLength = arr.length - 1;

const allExceptTheLast = arr.filter( (_, index) => index !== arrLength );
const [ theLastItem ] = arr.filter( (_, index) => index === arrLength );

We do not mutate the arr variable, but we still have all the array members, except the last item as an array and have the last item separately.

0

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