3

This is my code, which is supposed to hash the 2 columns in fotoFd.csv and then save the hashed columns in a separate file, T4Friendship.csv:

require "csv"

arrayUser=[]
arrayUserUnique=[]
arrayFriends=[]

fileLink = "fotoFd.csv"

f = File.open(fileLink, "r")
f.each_line { |line|
    row = line.split(",");
    arrayUser<<row[0]
    arrayFriends<<row[1]
}

arrayUserUnique = arrayUser.uniq
arrayHash = []

for i in 0..arrayUser.size-1

    arrayHash<<arrayUser[i]
    arrayHash<<i

end

hash = Hash[arrayHash.each_slice(2).to_a]

array1 =hash.values_at *arrayUser

array2 =hash.values_at *arrayFriends

fileLink = "T4Friendship.csv"


for i in 0..array1.size-1
    logfile = File.new(fileLink,"a")
    logfile.print("#{array1[i]},#{array2[i]}\n")
    logfile.close
end

The first columns contains users, and the second column contains their friends. So, I want it to produce something like this in the T4Friendship.csv:

1 2
1 4
1 10
1 35
2 1
2 8
2 11
3 28
3 31
...
3
  • Your code does not follow common Ruby idoms and is hard to read. Perhaps it would be easier if you show us an example of the input file and the expected output? – spickermann Oct 11 '15 at 16:09
  • I too have trouble following the intent of the code. I can point out the problem, but providing a proper workaround is hard without understanding the intent. – Daniel Stevens Oct 11 '15 at 20:20
  • Ok, it looks to me like you're trying to convert the user name to numeric user id values, such that repeated names map to the same value. You're then outputting the data in the same format as the original, but with the names replaced with the numbers. – Daniel Stevens Oct 11 '15 at 20:39
2

The problem is caused by the splat expansion of a large array. The splat * can be used to expand an array as a parameter list. The parameters are passed on the stack. If there are too many parameters, you'll exhaust stack space and get the mentioned error.

Here's a quick demo of the problem in irb that tries to splat an array of one million elements when calling puts:

irb
irb(main):001:0> a = [0] * 1000000; nil # Use nil to suppress statement output
=> nil
irb(main):002:0> puts *a
SystemStackError: stack level too deep
    from /usr/lib/ruby/1.9.1/irb/workspace.rb:80
Maybe IRB bug!
irb(main):003:0> 

You seem to be processing large CSV files, and so your arrayUser array is quite large. Expanding the large array with the splat causes the problem on the line:

array1 =hash.values_at *arrayUser

You can avoid the splat by calling map on arrayUser, and converting each value in a block:

array1 = arrayUser.map{ |user| hash[user] }


Suggested Code

Your code appears to map names to unique ID numbers. The output appears to be the same format as the input, except with the names translated to ID numbers. You can do this without keeping any arrays around eating up memory, and just use a single hash built up during read, and used to translate the names to numbers on the fly. The code would look like this:

def convertCsvNamesToNums(inputFileName, outputFileName)
    # Create unique ID number hash
    # When unknown key is lookedup, it is added with new unique ID number
    # Produces a 0 based index
    nameHash = Hash.new { |hash, key| hash[key] = hash.size }
    # Convert input CSV with names to output CSV with ID numbers
    File.open(inputFileName, "r") do |inputFile|
        File.open(outputFileName, 'w') do |outputFile|
            inputFile.each_line do |line|
                # Parse names from input CSV
                userName, friendName = line.split(",")
                # Map names to unique ID numbers
                userNum = nameHash[userName]
                friendNum = nameHash[friendName]
                # Write unique ID numbers to output CSV
                outputFile.puts "#{userNum}, #{friendNum}"
            end
        end
    end
end

convertCsvNamesToNums("fotoFd.csv", "T4Friendship.csv")

Note: This code assigns ID numbers to user and friends, as they are encountered. Your previous code assigned ID numbers to users only, and then looked up the friends after. The code I suggested will ensure friends are assigned ID numbers, even if they never appeared in the user list. The numerical ordering will different slightly from what you supplied, but I assume that is not important.

You can also shorten the body of the inner loop to:

        # Parse names from input, map to ID numbers, and write to output
        outputFile.puts line.split(",").map{|name| nameHash[name]}.join(',')

I thought I'd include this change separately for readability.


Updated Code

As per your request in the comments, here is code that gives priority to the user column for ID numbers. Only once the first column is completely processed will ID numbers be assigned to entries in the second column. It does this by first passing over the input once, adding the first column to the hash, and then passing over the input a second time to process it as before, using the pre-prepared hash from the first pass. New entries can still be added in the second pass in the case where the friend column contains a new entry that doesn't exist anywhere in the user column.

def convertCsvNamesToNums(inputFileName, outputFileName)
    # Create unique ID number hash
    # When unknown key is lookedup, it is added with new unique ID number
    # Produces a 0 based index
    nameHash = Hash.new { |hash, key| hash[key] = hash.size }
    # Pass over the data once to give priority to user column for ID numbers
    File.open(inputFileName, "r") do |inputFile|
        inputFile.each_line do |line|
            name, = line.split(",") # Parse name from line, ignore the rest
            nameHash[name]  # Add name to unique ID number hash (if it doesn't already exist)
        end
    end
    # Convert input CSV with names to output CSV with ID numbers
    File.open(inputFileName, "r") do |inputFile|
        File.open(outputFileName, 'w') do |outputFile|
            inputFile.each_line do |line|
                # Parse names from input, map to ID numbers, and write to output
                outputFile.puts line.split(",").map{|name| nameHash[name]}.join(',')
            end
        end
    end
end

convertCsvNamesToNums("fotoFd.csv", "T4Friendship.csv")
5
  • Thanks. Yes, that is what I wanted to do. But the code produces hashed file by hashing the file row-wise, i..e., hash all columns in first row, then proceed to second row and hash all the columns, and so on. Can you modify the code to hash it column-wise? That is, hash the first column, then check the second column to see if they exist in the first column; if not then assign new value, else assign existing value. – Kristada673 Oct 12 '15 at 15:35
  • Ahh, so that is a requirement then. Hmm, I guess that can be done with two passes through the data. Let me get back to you on that. May I ask why you want to do it that way? – Daniel Stevens Oct 12 '15 at 16:54
  • Because I am calculating similarities of these users based on their mutual friends, which I am storing in a nxn matrix, n is the number of users. After that, in this hashed file I want to generate in this question, I want a third column to be added which will refer to the corresponding similarity values from the similarity matrix. Herein lies the problem with this row-wise hashing. You see, in the similarity matrix, users are indexed sequentially from 1 to n. So if users in the first column of this hashed file are not indexed sequentially, it becomes very cumbersome to make this third column. – Kristada673 Oct 12 '15 at 17:08
  • Ahh, I think I understand now. The changes have been added. I hope it solves your problem. – Daniel Stevens Oct 12 '15 at 17:19
  • Wow. Thanks a ton ^_^ \(^.^)/ – Kristada673 Oct 12 '15 at 17:28

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