5

I have written a Python function that computes pairwise electromagnetic interactions between a largish number (N ~ 10^3) of particles and stores the results in an NxN complex128 ndarray. It runs, but it is the slowest part of a larger program, taking about 40 seconds when N=900 [corrected]. The original code looks like this:

import numpy as np
def interaction(s,alpha,kprop): # s is an Nx3 real array 
                                # alpha is complex
                                # kprop is float

    ndipoles = s.shape[0]

    Amat = np.zeros((ndipoles,3, ndipoles, 3), dtype=np.complex128)
    I = np.array([[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]])
    im = complex(0,1)

    k2 = kprop*kprop

    for i in range(ndipoles):
        xi = s[i,:]
        for j in range(ndipoles):
            if i != j:
                xj = s[j,:]
                dx = xi-xj
                R = np.sqrt(dx.dot(dx))
                n = dx/R
                kR = kprop*R
                kR2 = kR*kR
                A = ((1./kR2) - im/kR)
                nxn = np.outer(n, n)
                nxn = (3*A-1)*nxn + (1-A)*I
                nxn *= -alpha*(k2*np.exp(im*kR))/R
            else:
                nxn = I

            Amat[i,:,j,:] = nxn

    return(Amat.reshape((3*ndipoles,3*ndipoles)))

I had never previously used Cython, but that seemed like a good place to start in my effort to speed things up, so I pretty much blindly adapted the techniques I found in online tutorials. I got some speedup (30 seconds vs. 40 seconds), but not nearly as dramatic as I expected, so I'm wondering whether I'm doing something wrong or am missing a critical step. The following is my best attempt at cythonizing the above routine:

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np

DTYPE = np.complex128
ctypedef np.complex128_t DTYPE_t

def interaction(np.ndarray s, DTYPE_t alpha, float kprop):

    cdef float k2 = kprop*kprop
    cdef int i,j
    cdef np.ndarray xi, xj, dx, n, nxn
    cdef float R, kR, kR2
    cdef DTYPE_t A

    cdef int ndipoles = s.shape[0]
    cdef np.ndarray Amat = np.zeros((ndipoles,3, ndipoles, 3), dtype=DTYPE)
    cdef np.ndarray I = np.array([[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]])
    cdef DTYPE_t im = complex(0,1)

    for i in range(ndipoles):
        xi = s[i,:]
        for j in range(ndipoles):
            if i != j:
                xj = s[j,:]
                dx = xi-xj
                R = np.sqrt(dx.dot(dx))
                n = dx/R
                kR = kprop*R
                kR2 = kR*kR
                A = ((1./kR2) - im/kR)
                nxn = np.outer(n, n)
                nxn = (3*A-1)*nxn + (1-A)*I
                nxn *= -alpha*(k2*np.exp(im*kR))/R
            else:
                nxn = I

            Amat[i,:,j,:] = nxn

    return(Amat.reshape((3*ndipoles,3*ndipoles)))
7
  • 6
    Numpy is a C library. And uses BLAS for doing algebra, so it's pretty fast. I don't really understand how cython internals works, but being numpy already C code, the gain in speed is in anything "not numpy". – user3371637 Oct 11 '15 at 17:26
  • I assumed that enough of the line-by-line operations inside the nested loop required the direct invocation of the Python interpreter and that those lines were therefore likely the dominant cost relative to Numpy -- but maybe not? – Grant Petty Oct 11 '15 at 17:31
  • 1
    You can try to type the your numpy arrays, so that the compiler knows the types inside the arrays. Not sure how big the difference will be, though. You may want to run a profiler on the python code to see where you are actually losing the speed. If most of the time is spent in numpy routines, you will not gain much by using cython. – cel Oct 11 '15 at 17:35
  • 1
    My guess (but not take it for granted) is that the most time difference is in the range(dipoles). Try to use the faster numpy.arange() and see how near you go respect to cython. – user3371637 Oct 11 '15 at 17:41
  • 2
    Maybe look into profiling/annotating your code to see where the bottlenecks are: docs.cython.org/src/quickstart/… – Ryan Oct 11 '15 at 17:45
11

The real power of NumPy is in performing an operation across a huge number of elements in a vectorized manner instead of using that operation in chunks spread across loops. In your case, you are using two nested loops and one IF conditional statement. I would propose extending the dimensions of the intermediate arrays, which would bring in NumPy's powerful broadcasting capability to come into play and thus the same operations could be used on all elements in one go instead of small chunks of data within the loops.

For extending the dimensions, None/np.newaxis could be used. So, the vectorized implementation to follow such a premise would look like this -

def vectorized_interaction(s,alpha,kprop):

    im = complex(0,1)
    I = np.array([[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]])
    k2 = kprop*kprop

    # Vectorized calculations for dx, R, n, kR, A
    sd = s[:,None] - s 
    Rv = np.sqrt((sd**2).sum(2))
    nv = sd/Rv[:,:,None]
    kRv = Rv*kprop
    Av = (1./(kRv*kRv)) - im/kRv

    # Vectorized calculation for: "nxn = np.outer(n, n)"
    nxnv = nv[:,:,:,None]*nv[:,:,None,:]

    # Vectorized calculation for: "(3*A-1)*nxn + (1-A)*I"
    P = (3*Av[:,:,None,None]-1)*nxnv + (1-Av[:,:,None,None])*I

    # Vectorized calculation for: "-alpha*(k2*np.exp(im*kR))/R"    
    multv = -alpha*(k2*np.exp(im*kRv))/Rv

    # Vectorized calculation for: "nxn *= -alpha*(k2*np.exp(im*kR))/R"   
    outv = P*multv[:,:,None,None]


    # Simulate ELSE part of the conditional statement"if i != j:" 
    # with masked setting to I on the last two dimensions
    outv[np.eye((N),dtype=bool)] = I

    return outv.transpose(0,2,1,3).reshape(N*3,-1)

Runtime tests and output verification -

Case #1:

In [703]: N = 10
     ...: s = np.random.rand(N,3) + complex(0,1)*np.random.rand(N,3)
     ...: alpha = 3j
     ...: kprop = 5.4
     ...: 

In [704]: out_org = interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
     ...: out_vect = vectorized_interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
     ...: print np.allclose(np.real(out_org),np.real(out_vect))
     ...: print np.allclose(np.imag(out_org),np.imag(out_vect))
     ...: 
True
True

In [705]: %timeit interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
100 loops, best of 3: 7.6 ms per loop

In [706]: %timeit vectorized_interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
1000 loops, best of 3: 304 µs per loop

Case #2:

In [707]: N = 100
     ...: s = np.random.rand(N,3) + complex(0,1)*np.random.rand(N,3)
     ...: alpha = 3j
     ...: kprop = 5.4
     ...: 

In [708]: out_org = interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
     ...: out_vect = vectorized_interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
     ...: print np.allclose(np.real(out_org),np.real(out_vect))
     ...: print np.allclose(np.imag(out_org),np.imag(out_vect))
     ...: 
True
True

In [709]: %timeit interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
1 loops, best of 3: 826 ms per loop

In [710]: %timeit vectorized_interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
100 loops, best of 3: 14 ms per loop

Case #3:

In [711]: N = 900
     ...: s = np.random.rand(N,3) + complex(0,1)*np.random.rand(N,3)
     ...: alpha = 3j
     ...: kprop = 5.4
     ...: 

In [712]: out_org = interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
     ...: out_vect = vectorized_interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
     ...: print np.allclose(np.real(out_org),np.real(out_vect))
     ...: print np.allclose(np.imag(out_org),np.imag(out_vect))
     ...: 
True
True

In [713]: %timeit interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
1 loops, best of 3: 1min 7s per loop

In [714]: %timeit vectorized_interaction(s,alpha,kprop)
1 loops, best of 3: 1.59 s per loop
3
  • This works very well and is also a great education for me in ways to vectorize. One issue though: warnings are generated concern dividing by zero, presumably corresponding to the case that i=j, since R is then 0. Any way to accomplish the same thing without generating those warnings? I realize that the affected elements of the array get overwritten in the last line before the return, so maybe I just have to force myself ignore them. – Grant Petty Oct 11 '15 at 21:21
  • One other comment: the vectorized version appears to require a fair bit more memory than the original version, so when I raise N to 9000, the process seems to want at least 50 GB ( there is 16 GB in my machine). Maybe this is an unavoidable tradeoff with vectorization. – Grant Petty Oct 11 '15 at 21:40
  • 1
    @GrantPetty Yes, you need to ignore those warnings as we are setting those values anyway at the end. Also, you are right, it's the trade off with vectorization that you are using a lot more memory, but that's essentially why vectorization is that good, because it stores all those elements in memory and does everything in one go. – Divakar Oct 11 '15 at 21:43

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