4

I'm trying to use fancy -std=c++14 features to implement the "map" combinator you see in functional languages (not to be confused with std::map). My ultimate goal is to write a "facade pattern" header for functional programming that allows me to forget about side effects and iterators most of the time. I found a post by a like-minded individual at https://gist.github.com/phatak-dev/766eccf8c72484ad623b . Madhukara's version of map looks like

template <typename Collection,typename unop>
  Collection map(Collection col,unop op) {
  std::transform(col.begin(),col.end(),col.begin(),op);
  return col;
}

It seems to work perfectly as long as you don't ask for something silly, but the return type has to be the same as the input collection. My attempt to generalize to having domain and range of different types is as follows:

template <typename Collection, typename function> 
auto map(function f, Collection c)  {
  auto result;
  std::transform(c.begin(),c.end(),result.begin(),f);
  return result;
}

This doesn't compile, but hopefully it's clear to someone what I'm trying to do... I want to initialize an empty same-type-of-container-as-c of output-type-of-f's, then put the f(c[i])s in it. The compiler complains that the declaration of 'auto result' has no initializer, but I don't know how to ask for an empty whatever of whatevers. Is there a way to tweak that line to make it do what I'm trying to do? I've never tried to do anything this exotic with auto before, so any additional suggestions are welcome.

Thanks!

John

Edit: here's a hopefully-sensical example use:

auto first_letter = [](string s)  { return s[0]; }
vector<string> words; 
words.push_back("hello"); words.push_back("world");
vector<char> first_letters = map(first_letter, words); // {'h','w'}

Edit 2: Here's another approach that uses a heavyweight "streams" library (not to be confused with IO streams) to implement the "iterator pattern", like Java's Streams:

http://jscheiny.github.io/Streams/

The Java approach: http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-collections/streams.html

This streams approach allows more freedom of choice over container types (as several answerers seem to be in favor of) and lazy evaluation.

9
  • What would you like a use of this to look like? How would a caller specify whether they wanted a list or vector returned, say? Oct 11 '15 at 19:27
  • Sorry I was unclear and immediately realized it, but you asked before I edited. I'd like the output container to be the same as the input container, but not necessarily the same contained types.
    – user4861515
    Oct 11 '15 at 19:28
  • And how would you populate result if it starts out empty and you don't know the interface to it? How would you know to call push_back, insert, or whatever the function may be? Oct 11 '15 at 19:40
  • I'd like result to have the same collection implementation (e.g. list, vector) as c. If you ask the compiler to generate code for some data type that doesn't have the needed methods defined, it will give an error. Or perhaps I have misunderstood your point?
    – user4861515
    Oct 11 '15 at 19:44
  • Something like this ? Oct 11 '15 at 19:48
3

Just use boost::adaptors::tranformed:

#include <boost/range/adaptor/transformed.hpp>

template <typename Collection, typename function> 
auto map(function f, Collection c)  {
  return c | boost::adaptors::transformed(f);
}

With this range - you can create any container you want.

char first_letter(string s)  { return s[0]; }
vector<string> words; 
words.push_back("hello"); words.push_back("world");
auto transformed_range = map(first_letter, words);
vector<char> first_letters(begin(transformed_range ), end(transformed_range ));

If you insist to have map function returning the container, not range - add one more parameter to this function template:

#include <boost/range/adaptor/transformed.hpp>

template <typename Result, typename Collection, typename function> 
auto map(function f, Collection c)  {
  auto transformed_range = c | boost::adaptors::transformed(f);
  return Result(begin(transformed_range), end(transformed_range));
}

char first_letter(string s)  { return s[0]; }
vector<string> words; 
words.push_back("hello"); words.push_back("world");
vector<char> first_letters = map<vector<char>>(first_letter, words); 

But if you really insist to have the exact behavior as you want - you must have some traits knowing how to convert collection type to other collection type with transformed value.

First - the way to have new_value_type:

template <typename Function, typename OldValueType>
struct MapToTransformedValue
{
    using type = decltype(std::declval<Function>()(std::declval<OldValueType>()));
};

The general trait:

template <typename Function, typename Container>
struct MapToTransformedContainer;

The easiest case - for std::array:

// for std::array
template <typename Function, typename OldValueType, std::size_t N> 
struct MapToTransformedContainer<Function, std::array<OldValueType, N>>
{
    using value_type = typename MapToTransformedValue<Function, OldValueType>::type;
    using type =  std::array<value_type, N>;
};

For std::vector - a little more complicated - you need to provide new allocator, for std allocators - you can use its rebind template:

// for std::vector
template <typename Function, typename OldValueType, typename OldAllocator> 
struct MapToTransformedContainer<Function, std::vector<OldValueType, OldAllocator>>
{
    using value_type = typename MapToTransformedValue<Function, OldValueType>::type;
    using allocator = typename OldAllocator::template rebind<value_type>::other;
    using type =  std::vector<value_type, allocator>;
};

So your function will look like the following:

template <typename Collection, typename function> 
auto map(function f, Collection c)  
{
    using NewCollectionType = typename MapToTransformedContainer<function, Collection>::type;
    auto transformed_range = c | boost::adaptors::transformed(f);
    return NewCollectionType (begin(transformed_range), end(transformed_range));
}

Now - your main() is as desired:

char first_letter(std::string const& s)  { return s[0]; }

int main() {
    std::vector<std::string> words; 
    words.push_back("hello"); words.push_back("world");
    auto first_letters = map(first_letter, words); 
    std::cout << first_letters[0] << std::endl;
}

Beware that for other containers where value_type consists of Key,Value pair - like std::map, std::set (and their unordered_... siblings) you must define another specialization of MapToTransformedContainer...

1
  • I think that changing only the value_type and copy-pasting OtherTypes (along with allocators, comparators, and whatnots) is not the best idea (if it compiles whatsoever) Oct 12 '15 at 9:04
1

I would make use of the fact that most containers have a constructor taking a pair of iterators.

#include <boost/iterator/transform_iterator.hpp>

template <typename Function, typename Collection>
struct map_to
{
    Function f;
    const Collection& c;

    template <typename T>
    operator T() &&
    {
        using std::begin; using std::end;
        return { boost::make_transform_iterator(begin(c), f)
               , boost::make_transform_iterator(end(c), f) };
    }
};

template <typename Function, typename Collection> 
map_to<Function, Collection> map(Function f, const Collection& c)
{
    return { f, c };
}

Tests:

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::string> words; 

    words.push_back("hello");
    words.push_back("world");

    auto first_letter = [](std::string s) { return s[0]; };

    std::vector<char> v = map(first_letter, words);
    std::set<char> s = map(first_letter, words);
    std::forward_list<char> f = map(first_letter, words);
}

DEMO

8
  • I tried something like this and got odd compiler errors when I tried to use a lambda expression as the first argument to map...?
    – user4861515
    Oct 12 '15 at 3:03
  • @flagrant2 I can't tell what could possibly go wrong without seeing your code Oct 12 '15 at 6:13
  • I was trying to use the auto keyword for the output of map, e.g.
    – user4861515
    Oct 12 '15 at 6:47
  • @flagrant2 you can store the result of map(...) but you can't use the implicit conversion operator without std::move because the operator has a ref-qualifier (&&). it was added on purpose, because it's unsafe to store a reference Oct 12 '15 at 7:03
  • I think this is breaking my existing code because I assumed the output value of map would be the same container type as the input container. For example, with words having type vector<string> as in your test, if I said auto first_letters = map(first_letter,words); the code I have assumes that first_letters is unambiguously a vector<char>. Unfortunately I haven't had much experience writing my own templates, so I need to read up on that to try to modify your solution for my needs. Thanks again for your help.
    – user4861515
    Oct 12 '15 at 7:08
0

Just for the fun of it, here's my go at this problem:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <set>
#include <vector>

template <template<typename...> class Collection> 
struct mapper {
    template<typename function, typename T, typename... Rest>
    static auto map(function f, const Collection<T, Rest...>& c)  {
      Collection<decltype(f(*c.begin()))> result;
      std::transform(c.begin(),c.end(),std::inserter(result, result.end()),f);
      return result;
    }
};

int main()
{
    // Example 1
    std::vector<int> v{0, 1};
    auto fv = mapper<std::vector>::map([](const auto& val) { return val + 0.1f; }, v);
    for (const auto& f : fv) { std::cout << f << " "; }

    std::cout << "\n";

    // Example 2 
    std::set<float> m{1, 2, 3, 4}; 
    auto fm = mapper<std::set>::map([](const auto& val) { return static_cast<int>(val / 2.0f); }, m);
    for (const auto& f : fm) { std::cout << f << " "; }
}

Note, that this would only work as long as you are happy with default values for everything but the type parameter of the output container.

0

I had the same task, and was okay with compromising on functionality if it meant reduced boilerplate.

Here's what I ended up with (may not work with containers which use more than one explicit arg or whose template args cannot be inferred trivially, but you'll agree it is clean to use).

using std::vector;

template<typename Src, typename Dst, template<class, typename ...> typename Container>
Container<Dst> fmap(Container<Src>& container, Dst(*f)(Src)) {
    Container<Dst> result;
    result.reserve(container.size());
    std::transform(container.begin(), container.end(), std::back_inserter(result), f);
    return result;
}

int main() {
    vector<int> a = {1, 2, 3};
    auto f = [](int x) -> double { return (x + 1)/2; };
    vector<double> b = fmap(a, +f);
    for (auto x: b) {
        std::cout << x << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

A major requirement for me was to not make it ugly to use, and it shouldn't use boost.

Edit: This would also behave dumb (read: not compile) if you tried to pass a vector with a non-standard allocator, let's say.

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