20

Here's an appeal for a better way to do something that I can already do inefficiently: filter a series of n-gram tokens using "stop words" so that the occurrence of any stop word term in an n-gram triggers removal.

I'd very much like to have one solution that works for both unigrams and n-grams, although it would be ok to have two versions, one with a "fixed" flag and one with a "regex" flag. I'm putting the two aspects of the question together since someone may have a solution that tries a different approach that addresses both fixed and regular expression stopword patterns.

Formats:

  • tokens are a list of character vectors, which may be unigrams, or n-grams concatenated by a _ (underscore) character.

  • stopwords are a character vector. Right now I am content to let this be a fixed string, but it would be a nice bonus to be able to implement this using regular expression formatted stopwords too.

Desired Output: A list of characters matching the input tokens but with any component token matching a stop word being removed. (This means a unigram match, or a match to one of the terms which the n-gram comprises.)

Examples, test data, and working code and benchmarks to build on:

tokens1 <- list(text1 = c("this", "is", "a", "test", "text", "with", "a", "few", "words"), 
                text2 = c("some", "more", "words", "in", "this", "test", "text"))
tokens2 <- list(text1 = c("this_is", "is_a", "a_test", "test_text", "text_with", "with_a", "a_few", "few_words"), 
                text2 = c("some_more", "more_words", "words_in", "in_this", "this_text", "text_text"))
tokens3 <- list(text1 = c("this_is_a", "is_a_test", "a_test_text", "test_text_with", "text_with_a", "with_a_few", "a_few_words"),
                text2 = c("some_more_words", "more_words_in", "words_in_this", "in_this_text", "this_text_text"))
stopwords <- c("is", "a", "in", "this")

# remove any single token that matches a stopword
removeTokensOP1 <- function(w, stopwords) {
    lapply(w, function(x) x[-which(x %in% stopwords)])
}

# remove any word pair where a single word contains a stopword
removeTokensOP2 <- function(w, stopwords) {
    matchPattern <- paste0("(^|_)", paste(stopwords, collapse = "(_|$)|(^|_)"), "(_|$)")
    lapply(w, function(x) x[-grep(matchPattern, x)])
}

removeTokensOP1(tokens1, stopwords)
## $text1
## [1] "test"  "text"  "with"  "few"   "words"
## 
## $text2
## [1] "some"  "more"  "words" "test"  "text" 

removeTokensOP2(tokens1, stopwords)
## $text1
## [1] "test"  "text"  "with"  "few"   "words"
## 
## $text2
## [1] "some"  "more"  "words" "test"  "text" 

removeTokensOP2(tokens2, stopwords)
## $text1
## [1] "test_text" "text_with" "few_words"
## 
## $text2
## [1] "some_more"  "more_words" "text_text" 

removeTokensOP2(tokens3, stopwords)
## $text1
## [1] "test_text_with"
## 
## $text2
## [1] "some_more_words"

# performance benchmarks for answers to build on
require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(OP1_1 = removeTokensOP1(tokens1, stopwords),
               OP2_1 = removeTokensOP2(tokens1, stopwords),
               OP2_2 = removeTokensOP2(tokens2, stopwords),
               OP2_3 = removeTokensOP2(tokens3, stopwords),
               unit = "relative")
## Unit: relative
## expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval
## OP1_1 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000   100
## OP2_1 5.119066 3.812845 3.438076 3.714492 3.547187 2.838351   100
## OP2_2 5.230429 3.903135 3.509935 3.790143 3.631305 2.510629   100
## OP2_3 5.204924 3.884746 3.578178 3.753979 3.553729 8.240244   100
  • the method of stopwords removal in tm or qdap is not enough? Though they work the other way, first remove the stopwords then create the n-grams. – phiver Oct 12 '15 at 14:44
  • 1
    No, that's easy enough, I'm trying to figure out a efficient way to remove stopword-containing ngrams after construction. – Ken Benoit Oct 12 '15 at 14:54
  • Have you checked out the new package of Tyler Rinker, termco on github? That looks promising. Haven't had time to check it out yet. – phiver Oct 13 '15 at 8:00
  • basically a vectorized version of grepl for long vectors written in c. yes I was hoping someone would write that, too :} @Rcore – rawr Oct 18 '15 at 14:40
  • stringi comes close to that but not vectorized in the way needed here. I didn't use stringi in the examples/base code for this reason (it was not faster for this task in my tests, although it has many other attractive properties). But maybe someone will prove me wrong! – Ken Benoit Oct 18 '15 at 16:13
5
+50

This isn't really an answer - more of a comment to reply to rawr's comment of going through all combinations of stopwords. With a longer stopwords list, using something like %in% doesn't seem to suffer that dimensionality issue.

library(purrr)
removetokenstst <- function(tokens, stopwords) 
  map2(tokens, 
       lapply(tokens3, function(x) { 
         unlist(lapply(strsplit(x, "_"), function(y) { 
           any(y %in% stopwords) 
         })) 
       }), 
       ~ .x[!.y])

require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(OP1_1 = removeTokensOP1(tokens1, morestopwords),
           OP2_1 = removeTokensOP2(tokens1, morestopwords),
           OP2_2 = removeTokensOP2(tokens2, morestopwords),
           OP2_3 = removeTokensOP2(tokens3, morestopwords),
           Ak_3 = removetokenstst(tokens3, stopwords),
           Ak_3msw = removetokenstst(tokens3, morestopwords),
           unit = "relative")

Unit: relative
    expr       min        lq       mean    median        uq      max neval
   OP1_1   1.00000   1.00000   1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.00000   100
   OP2_1 278.48260 176.22273  96.462854 79.787932 76.904987 38.31767   100
   OP2_2 280.90242 181.22013  98.545148 81.407928 77.637006 64.94842   100
   OP2_3 279.43728 183.11366 114.879904 81.404236 82.614739 72.04741   100
    Ak_3  15.74301  14.83731   9.340444  7.902213  8.164234 11.27133   100
 Ak_3msw  18.57697  14.45574  12.936594  8.513725  8.997922 24.03969   100

Stopwords

morestopwords = c("a", "about", "above", "after", "again", "against", "all", 
"am", "an", "and", "any", "are", "arent", "as", "at", "be", "because", 
"been", "before", "being", "below", "between", "both", "but", 
"by", "cant", "cannot", "could", "couldnt", "did", "didnt", "do", 
"does", "doesnt", "doing", "dont", "down", "during", "each", 
"few", "for", "from", "further", "had", "hadnt", "has", "hasnt", 
"have", "havent", "having", "he", "hed", "hell", "hes", "her", 
"here", "heres", "hers", "herself", "him", "himself", "his", 
"how", "hows", "i", "id", "ill", "im", "ive", "if", "in", "into", 
"is", "isnt", "it", "its", "its", "itself", "lets", "me", "more", 
"most", "mustnt", "my", "myself", "no", "nor", "not", "of", "off", 
"on", "once", "only", "or", "other", "ought", "our", "ours", 
"ourselves", "out", "over", "own", "same", "shant", "she", "shed", 
"shell", "shes", "should", "shouldnt", "so", "some", "such", 
"than", "that", "thats", "the", "their", "theirs", "them", "themselves", 
"then", "there", "theres", "these", "they", "theyd", "theyll", 
"theyre", "theyve", "this", "those", "through", "to", "too", 
"under", "until", "up", "very", "was", "wasnt", "we", "wed", 
"well", "were", "weve", "were", "werent", "what", "whats", "when", 
"whens", "where", "wheres", "which", "while", "who", "whos", 
"whom", "why", "whys", "with", "wont", "would", "wouldnt", "you", 
"youd", "youll", "youre", "youve", "your", "yours", "yourself", 
"yourselves", "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", 
"k", "l", "m", "n", "o", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "w", 
"x", "y", "z")
  • right but this isn't doing exactly the same thing since %in% is only matching against the table, ie, length of stopwords or whatever you get when you split the strings whereas grepl is going character-by-character. so for stopwords <- c("is", "a", "in", "this"), %in% has four things to do and grepl has many more depending on the target vector and length of those strings – rawr Oct 21 '15 at 21:23
1

We can improve on the lapply if you have many levels in your list using the parallel package.

Create many levels

tokens2 <- list(text1 = c("this_is", "is_a", "a_test", "test_text", "text_with", "with_a", "a_few", "few_words"), 
                text2 = c("some_more", "more_words", "words_in", "in_this", "this_text", "text_text"))
tokens2 <- lapply(1:500,function(x) sample(tokens2,1)[[1]])

We do this because the parallel package has a lot of overhead to set up, so just increasing the number of iterations on microbenchmark will continue to incur that cost. By increasing the size of the list, you see the true improvement.

library(parallel)
#Setup
cl <- detectCores()
cl <- makeCluster(cl)

#Two functions:

#original
removeTokensOP2 <- function(w, stopwords) { 
  matchPattern <- paste0("(^|_)", paste(stopwords, collapse = "(_|$)|(^|_)"), "(_|$)")
  lapply(w, function(x) x[-grep(matchPattern, x)])
}

#new
removeTokensOPP <- function(w, stopwords) {
  matchPattern <- paste0("(^|_)", paste(stopwords, collapse = "(_|$)|(^|_)"), "(_|$)")
  return(w[-grep(matchPattern, w)])
}

#compare

microbenchmark(
  OP2_P = parLapply(cl,tokens2,removeTokensOPP,stopwords),
  OP2_2 = removeTokensOP2(tokens2, stopwords),
  unit = 'relative'
)

Unit: relative
  expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval
 OP2_P 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000  1.00000   100
 OP2_2 1.730565 1.653872 1.678781 1.562258 1.471347 10.11306   100

As the number of levels in your list increases, the performance will improve.

1

You migth consider simlifying your regular expressions, ^ and $ are adding to the overhead

remove_short <- function(x, stopwords) {
  stopwords_regexp <- paste0('(^|_)(', paste(stopwords, collapse = '|'), ')(_|$)')
  lapply(x, function(x) x[!grepl(stopwords_regexp, x)])
}
require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(OP1_1 = removeTokensOP1(tokens1, stopwords),
               OP2_1 = removeTokensOP2(tokens2, stopwords),
               OP2_2 = remove_short(tokens2, stopwords),
               unit = "relative")
Unit: relative
  expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
 OP1_1 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000   100 a  
 OP2_1 5.178565 4.768749 4.465138 4.441130 4.262399 4.266905   100   c
 OP2_2 3.452386 3.247279 3.063660 3.068571 2.963794 2.948189   100  b 
  • But then I get a positive match for "beautiful" from the stopword "if", etc. – Ken Benoit Oct 23 '15 at 1:42
  • 1
    You are right. Still there is a minor optimizatiou to your regex: Instead of (^|_)is(_|$)|(^|_)a(_|$)|(^|_)in(_|$)|(^|_)this(_|$) you could write it as (^|_)(is|a|in|this)(_|$) I've edited my answer to reflect the difference – Vlados Oct 23 '15 at 9:31

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