14

Found this example of quine:

s='s=%r;print(s%%s)';print(s%s)

I get that %s and %r do the str and repr functions, as pointed here, but what exactly means the s%s part and how the quine works?

15

s is set to:

's=%r;print(s%%s)'

so the %r gets replaced by exactly that (keeping the single quotes) in s%s and the final %% with a single %, giving:

s='s=%r;print(s%%s)';print(s%s)

and hence the quine.

  • 1
    Specifically, %r means use the repr() function as opposed to the str() function (%s). See printf-style String Formatting. – Nick T Oct 12 '15 at 5:26
  • Thank you! Also here I found a detailed explanation why s%%s is printed like s%s. – Stepan Ustinov Oct 12 '15 at 12:37
3

The operator x % y means substitute the value y in the format string x, same way as C printf. Also note that the %% specifier stands for a literal % sign so s%%s within the format string will print as s%s, and will not capture a string.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.