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I have this homework wherein I need to make a program that asks three SIGNED numbers from the user and my program should be able to sort these numbers in ascending order. I can do it in C++ but I am not that familiar with NASM/Assembly Language.

Here's my code so far:

%include "asm_io.inc"

segment .data
;
; Output strings
;
prompta         db    "Enter the 1st number: ", 0
promptb         db    "Enter the 2nd number: ", 0
promptc         db    "Enter the 3rd number: ", 0
promptd         db    "The sorted list is: ", 0

segment .bss
input   resd 1


segment .text
        global  _asm_main
_asm_main:
        enter   0,0               ; setup routine
        pusha

        mov     eax, prompta
        call    print_string

        call    read_int
        push eax

        mov    eax, promptb
        call    print_string

        call    read_int
        push eax

        mov     eax, promptc
        call    print_string

        call    read_int
        push eax


        call add_stack

        mov ebx, eax

        mov     eax, promptd 
        call    print_string
        mov     eax, ebx
        call    print_int
        call    print_nl

        sub esp, 16

        popa
        mov     eax, 0            ; return back to C
        leave                     
        ret


segment .data
; no need for .data

segment .bss
; no need for variables

segment .text
add_stack:
        enter   0,0

        mov ecx, [ebp+8]
        mov ebx, [ebp+12]
        mov eax, [ebp+16]

        cmp eax, ebx 
        jg A

        cmp ebx, ecx
        jg B 

        cmp ecx, eax
        jg C

        A:
        push eax 

        B:
        push ebx 

        C:
        push ecx 

        popa 
        leave
        ret
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  • What's your question? You've written some code, and since you've posted it here I'm going to assume that it isn't working the way you expected it to. So in what way exactly is it not working? Have you run your program through a debugger (like gdb) to try to figure out where in the code things go wrong? If not, that's probably where you should start.
    – Michael
    Oct 12, 2015 at 6:52
  • Basically, a user will input 3 SIGNED numbers and my program should sort these numbers in ascending order. However, my program so far, only gets the 3 inputs then instead of sorting it, it only gives back/displays the 1st input. I believe the error is on "add_stack" especially on the function calls. And on the comparison part as well.
    – lexus
    Oct 12, 2015 at 6:55
  • There is something odd about the add_stack function, where you push 1, 2, or 3 registers (depending on their values). Using cmp and jump as an if-statement is ok, but unlike in C you have to explicitly jump over the else-part yourself. Also, wouldn't the popa at the end remove what you just pushed?
    – Bo Persson
    Oct 12, 2015 at 7:05
  • Thanks for pointing out about the "popa" part. As for the jump functions, I'm not really sure 'cause I'm new to assembly language. What should I do 'cause it only displays the first input? It should print the 3 numbers sorted. Help :(
    – lexus
    Oct 12, 2015 at 7:34
  • In function add_stack you're trying to set up the stack for the function call to print_string. Setting up the stack for a function call cannot be done within a function (at least not like this) as the leave instruction will effectively undo whatever you have just put on the stack. As a simple approach, consider moving the content of add_stack directly into your main function.
    – matz
    Oct 12, 2015 at 7:48

1 Answer 1

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In C++ you cannot change the arguments inside of a function and use it later by the caller, but in assembly you can do everything. You pushed the input onto the stack for later using as arguments for the function add_stack. What about to sort these values and store them back to the original place on the stack:

%include "asm_io.inc"

segment .data
;
; Output strings
;
prompta         db    "Enter the 1st number: ", 0
promptb         db    "Enter the 2nd number: ", 0
promptc         db    "Enter the 3rd number: ", 0
promptd         db    "The sorted list is: ", 0

segment .text
        global  _asm_main
_asm_main:
        enter   0,0               ; setup routine
        pusha

        mov     eax, prompta
        call    print_string
        call    read_int
        push    eax

        mov     eax, promptb
        call    print_string
        call    read_int
        push    eax

        mov     eax, promptc
        call    print_string
        call    read_int
        push    eax

        call    sort_stack      ; Three arguments pushed before

        mov     eax, promptd
        call    print_string

        mov     ecx, 3          ; Pop and write the arguments for `sort_stack`
        .print_list:
        pop     eax
        call    print_int
        mov     al, 32
        call    print_char
        loop    .print_list
        call    print_nl

        popa
        mov     eax, 0            ; return back to C
        leave
        ret

sort_stack:
        enter   0,0

        mov     ecx, [ebp+8]
        mov     ebx, [ebp+12]
        mov     eax, [ebp+16]

        cmp     eax, ebx
        jg      .1
        xchg    eax, ebx

        .1:
        cmp     ebx, ecx
        jg      .2
        xchg    ebx, ecx

        .2:
        cmp     eax, ebx
        jg      .3
        xchg    eax, ebx

        .3:                     ; Write back the registers
        mov     [ebp+8], ecx
        mov     [ebp+12], ebx
        mov     [ebp+16], eax

        leave
        ret

I'm not sure, if your teacher will like this "trick".

3
  • I tried compiling it and saw a problem: It actually doesn't sort the numbers but it arranges the numbers ordinally as to when they were entered. If I input: 1-2-3 It will output: 3-2-1 It outputs the last integer entered, then the 2nd then the 1st entered. Thanks for the help though. May use it as a reference.
    – lexus
    Oct 13, 2015 at 5:04
  • @AndreevBajet: It works here (tested on MinGW, CygWin, Debian Wheezy with GCC and LD). So I can't help you :-(
    – rkhb
    Oct 13, 2015 at 7:31
  • @AndreevBajet: You should consider accepting answers that solve your problem. Oct 13, 2015 at 18:38

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