27

Consider this example:

var task = DoSomething()
bool ready = await DoSomethingElse();
if (!ready) 
  return null;

var value = await DoThirdThing(); // depends on DoSomethingElse
return value + await task;

DoSomething does some very important work that may take a while, thus we start it off first.
In the meantime we check whether we're ready with DoSomethingElse and exit early if not.
We call DoThirdThing only if we are ready, as the universe might otherwise explode.

We cannot use Task.WhenAll as DoThirdThing depends on DoSomethingElse and we also don't want to wait for DoSomething because we want to call the other two methods concurrently if possible.

The question: What happens to task if we're not ready and exit early?

Will any exceptions that it throws be re-thrown by a SynchronizationContext?
Are there problems if task completes normally, as nobody consumes its value?

Follow-up: Is there a neat way to make sure task is awaited?

We could simply await task if we are not ready, however if there were 50 exit conditions this would be very tedious.
Could a finally block be used to await task and re-throw potential exceptions? If task completed normally it would be awaited again in the finally block, but that shouldn't cause any problems?

  • 3
    You can add a continuation on a task that only executes if the task faults using aTask.ContinueWith overload that takes a TaskContinuationOptions as a parameter, specifying TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted – Preston Guillot Oct 12 '15 at 17:12
  • I was considering to do that, but thought there might be other ways to achieve the same, seeing as there are many SO questions were people advice against ContinueWith and in favor of await due to simpler control flow. Definitely a clean and concise option, though. – enzi Oct 12 '15 at 19:31
  • 1
    @PrestonGuillot: There is absolutely no reason to use ContinueWith here. It is merely an extremely dangerous version of await, and should not be used. – Stephen Cleary Oct 12 '15 at 22:13
  • @enzi, I posted a follow-up question here. – avo Oct 30 '15 at 23:57
  • Parallel execution is not achieved by just using async/await. You could use Task.Run to start the long-running process on a worker thread. Alternatively, you could consider WhenAny or the Parallel class. For your case, one approach could be: 1. await DoSomethingElse(). 2. await Task.WhenAll(DoThirdThing(), DoSomething()). This way, you can first take into account the result of DoSomethingElse, after which the other two tasks can run in parallel. – Timo May 4 '18 at 12:38
20

The question: What happens to task if we're not ready and exit early?

Nothing. The code ignores the task, so the task is ignored.

Will any exceptions that it throws be re-thrown by a SynchronizationContext?

No. They will (eventually) be passed to TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException and then ignored.

Are there problems if task completes normally, as nobody consumes its value?

Nope.

Follow-up: Is there a neat way to make sure task is awaited?

No.

Could a finally block be used to await task and re-throw potential exceptions?

Yes, if your code actually awaits the task. Presumably this would mean saving the task somewhere.

If task completed normally it would be awaited again in the finally block, but that shouldn't cause any problems?

You can await a task as many times as you like.

We could simply await task if we are not ready, however if there were 50 exit conditions this would be very tedious.

Then consider restructuring your code.

  • Huh. And here I thought such exceptions might even tear down the process. Would you then recommend leaving tasks potentially un-awaited (with TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException logging all exceptions), or should one strive to always consume their result? It doesn't sound as if there are any major downsides to it, assuming no exceptions are thrown "by design". – enzi Oct 12 '15 at 19:27
  • 1
    @enzi: It entirely depends on your application logic. If the operation is something that can be ignored, then it can be ignored. If not, then it shouldn't be ignored. – Stephen Cleary Oct 12 '15 at 22:12
1

Follow-up: Is there a neat way to make sure task is awaited?

If you need individual, more fine-grained than TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException control over exceptions thrown by the tasks you don't await, there is a handy tool for that: async void methods.

Your code might look like this:

static async void Observe(Task task)
{        
    // use try/catch here if desired so;

    // otherwise, exceptions will be thrown out-of-band, i.e.
    // via SyncronizationContext.Post or 
    // via ThreadPool.QueueUSerWorkItem (if there's no sync. context) 

    await task; 
}

// ...

var taskObserved = false;
var task = DoSomething()
try
{
    bool ready = await DoSomethingElse();
    if (!ready) 
      return null;

    var value = await DoThirdThing(); // depends on DoSomethingElse
    taskObserved = true;
    return value + await task;
 }
 finally
 {
     if (!taskObserved)
        Observe(task);
 }

Some more details can be found here and here.

  • Is there a way to tell if the task has been observed yet or not, so I can choose whether to await it or not inside Observe? – avo Oct 30 '15 at 23:15
  • 1
    @avo, without resorting to reflection, I'm not aware of any documented way to check that. I suggest you ask this as a separate question though. – noseratio Oct 30 '15 at 23:23
  • I asked it here. – avo Oct 30 '15 at 23:54

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