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I was wondering what's the proper way to implement Quadprog to solve quadratic programming.

I have the following question(ripped from the internet)and also was looking at the following http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~thocking/mines-course/2011-04-01-svm/svm-qp.pdf

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What would be the proper way to solve this issue? Would this tutorial be useful to solve if i was given a question like above? http://www.r-bloggers.com/solving-quadratic-progams-with-rs-quadprog-package/

1 Answer 1

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Here is an implementation, for linear C-SVM, which is based on the primal optimization problem:

min_{beta_0, beta, zeta} 1/2 w^T w + C sum_{i = 1}^N zeta_i
subject to:
    y_i (w^T x_i + b) >= 1 - zeta_i, for all i = 1, 2, ..., N
    zeta_i >= 0, for all i = 1, 2, ..., N

where N is the number of data points.

Note that using quadprog to solve this is, to some degree, more of a pedagogical exercise, as quadprog relies on an interior point algorithm, while in practice a specialized algorithm would be used, such as Platt's SMO, which takes advantage of particular properties of the SVM optimization problem.

In order to use quadprog, given the equations above, it all boils down to setting up the matrices and vectors that specify the optimization problem.

One issue, however, is that quadprog requires the matrix appearing in the quadratic function to be positive definite (see, for example, http://www.r-bloggers.com/more-on-quadratic-progamming-in-r/), while the implementation used here leads to it being positive semi-definite, since the intercept beta_0 and the zeta_i do not appear in the quadratic function. To go around this issue, I set the diagonal elements corresponding to these values in the matrix to a very small value.

To setup the example code, using the spam dataset, a binary classification problem:

library(kernlab) # for the spam data
# Load the input data to be used
data(spam)

# Use only a subset of the data (20%)
spam <- spam[sample(nrow(spam), round(0.2 * nrow(spam)), replace = FALSE), ]

# Retrieve the features and data
X <- spam[, 1:(ncol(spam) - 1)]
Y_f <- spam[, ncol(spam)]
Y <- 2 * (as.numeric(Y_f) - 1.5) # {-1, 1}

# Sample size
N <- nrow(X)
# Number of dimensions
n_d <- ncol(X)

# Value of the regularization parameter
C <- 1

In order to setup the optimization problem, keep in mind the format employed by package quadprog:

#
# Formulation: min(−d^T * b + 0.5 * b^T * D * b) with the constraints A^T * b >= b_0
#
# solve.QP(Dmat, dvec, Amat, bvec, meq=0, factorized=FALSE)
#
# Arguments
#   Dmat: matrix appearing in the quadratic function to be minimized.
#   dvec: vector appearing in the quadratic function to be minimized.
#   Amat: matrix defining the constraints under which we want to minimize the quadratic function.
#   bvec: vector holding the values of b0 (defaults to zero).
#   meq: the first meq constraints are treated as equality constraints, all further as inequality 
#   constraints (defaults to 0).
#   factorized logical flag: if TRUE, then we are passing R−1 (where D = RT R) instead of the
#   matrix D in the argument Dmat.
#

Then, organizing the parameter vector as:

# b = (beta_0, beta, zeta), 
# where: beta_0 in R, beta in Re^n_d, zeta in Re^N

such that:

d <- c(0, rep(0, n_d), rep(-C, N)) # -C * sum(zeta)

# Need a work-around for the matrix D, which must be positive definite (being 
# positive semi-definite is not enough...)
# See http://www.r-bloggers.com/more-on-quadratic-progamming-in-r/
eps <- 1e-10 # this will ultimately be the lowest eigenvalue of matrix D (with multiplicity N + 1)
D <- diag(c(eps, rep(1, n_d), rep(eps, N))) # beta^T * beta

#
# Matrix specifying the constraints
# For zeta_i > 0: 
#          beta_0 |    beta       |     zeta
#   A_1 = [      0,   0, 0, ..., 0, 1, 0, 0, ..., 0]
#         [      0,   0, 0, ..., 0, 0, 1, 0, ..., 0]
#         [      0,   0, 0, ..., 0, 0, 0, 1, ..., 0]  
#          ...
#         [      0,   0, 0, ..., 0, 0, 0, 0, ..., 1]
# where matrix A_1 has N rows, and N + n_d + 1 columns
#
# For beta_0 * y_i + beta^T * x_i * y_i + zeta_i >= 1:
#          beta_0 |                         beta                        |        zeta
#   A_2 = [    y_1, y_1 * x_{1, 1}, y_1 * x_{2, 2}, ..., y_1 * x{i, n_d}, 1, 0, 0, ..., 0]
#         [    y_2, y_2 * x_{2, 1}, y_2 * x_{2, 2}, ..., y_2 * x{i, n_d}, 0, 1, 0, ..., 0]
#          ...        
#         [    y_N, y_N * x_{N, 1}, y_2 * x_{N, 2}, ..., y_N * x{N, n_d}, 0, 0, 0, ..., 1]
#
I_N <- diag(N) # N x N identity matrix

A_1 <- cbind(matrix(0, ncol = n_d + 1, nrow = N), I_N) # zeta_i > 0, for all i; N rows
A_2 <- as.matrix(cbind(as.matrix(Y), X * as.matrix(Y)[, rep(1, n_d)], I_N)) # zeta_i + beta_0 * y_i + beta^T * x_i * y_i >= 1, for all i; N rows
rownames(A_1) <- NULL; rownames(A_2) <- NULL
colnames(A_1) <- NULL; colnames(A_2) <- NULL

A <- t(rbind(A_1, A_2))
b_0 <- c(rep(0, N), rep(1, N))

Finally, solve the optimization problem and retrieve the parameter values:

library(quadprog)
results <- solve.QP(D, d, A, b_0)

# Retrieve the results
b_optim <- results$solution

beta_0 <- b_optim[1]
beta <- b_optim[1 + (1:n_d)]
zeta <- b_optim[(n_d + 1) + (1:N)]

Afterwards, given a matrix X_test, the model can be used to predict via:

Y_pred <- sign(apply(X_test, 1, function(x) beta_0 + sum(beta * as.vector(x))))
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