So, I'm a javascript programmer and the new version of JavaScript (ES6) has a new keyword for declaring variables: let, next to the old one var.

I know the difference between these two, but I was asking myself: what does let stand for? var obviously is an abbreviation of "variable", but let? Is it an abbreviation as well? Where does it come from?

I googled this and to my amazement, I couldn't find an answer. I already knew Swift also has a let keyword (they use it for constants), but apparently some other programming languages use it as well.

marked as duplicate by Shog9 Jan 10 '17 at 3:47

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  • 17
    let stands for... drumroll please... let. You could read let x = 1; as "let x be 1" if that helps. – JJJ Oct 12 '15 at 21:07
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    it's an english verb; "let this name be this value". – dandavis Oct 12 '15 at 21:07
  • 1
    seriously, just that simple? – ngstschr Oct 12 '15 at 21:08
  • 16
    it stands for lettuce because it leaves itself behind... – dandavis Oct 12 '15 at 21:09
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    @dandavis - hall of fame comment :-) – Amit Oct 12 '15 at 21:21
up vote 39 down vote accepted

It comes from the English word 'let'.

verb: "let", "letting". 1. to allow or permit:

// Hey computer, can you please
let 
// this
night = 'wonderful'

Lisp has the keyword let and it's been around since 1958, though it may have come from even earlier.

  • 8
    I've always assumed programming languages inherited it from the language of mathematical proofs, which often say e.g. "Let x be an integer..." – Jordan Running Oct 12 '15 at 21:11
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    @Jordan that's completely likely. You find let used more in functional programming languages which are built on algebraic types and category theory. – azium Oct 12 '15 at 21:12
  • 3
    I always think of it more along the lines of "let the keyword night equal 'wonderful'" but that's probably just me. – Tiny Giant Oct 12 '15 at 21:21
  • @Jordan I found an example here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – ngstschr Oct 12 '15 at 21:24

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