3

I'm programming in C language under Debian distribution using Eclipse Luna IDE.

The main process of my program should execute only once and so create only 3 children process and then end after all children end.

I cant see what's wrong in my code but my program creates more than 3 children with different fathers.

Could someone tell me how to get the expected outputs?

Seems the main function is executing more then once but it doesn't have a loop to do it.

Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

int main(){

    pid_t IMU1_PID, IMU2_PID, IMU3_PID;

    IMU1_PID=fork();
    IMU2_PID=fork();
    IMU3_PID=fork();

    if (IMU1_PID<0 || IMU2_PID<0 || IMU3_PID<0) { perror("fork"); exit(errno);}

    if(IMU1_PID==0){
        printf("child1's PID: %d - father's PID: %d\n",getpid(),getppid());
        sleep(2);
        exit(0);
    }
    if(IMU2_PID==0){
        printf("child2's PID: %d - father's PID: %d\n",getpid(),getppid());
        sleep(2);
        exit(0);
    }
    if(IMU3_PID==0){
        printf("child3's PID: %d - father's PID: %d\n",getpid(),getppid());
        sleep(2);
        exit(0);
    }

    printf("PARENT %d waiting until all CHILDS end\n",getpid());
    while(wait(NULL)!=-1);
    printf("PARENT %d after all CHILDS ended\n",getpid());

    return 0;
}

Here are the outputs:

PARENT 4282 waiting until all CHILDS end
child3's PID: 4285 - father's PID: 4282
child2's PID: 4284 - father's PID: 4282
child2's PID: 4286 - father's PID: 4284
child1's PID: 4288 - father's PID: 4283
child1's PID: 4283 - father's PID: 4282
child1's PID: 4287 - father's PID: 4283
child1's PID: 4289 - father's PID: 4287
PARENT 4282 after all CHILDS ended

Here is like I expect:

PARENT 4282 waiting until all CHILDS end
child3's PID: 4285 - father's PID: 4282
child2's PID: 4284 - father's PID: 4282
child1's PID: 4288 - father's PID: 4282
PARENT 4282 after all CHILDS ended

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  • 2
    Why do you think "The main process of my program should execute only once ... "? When you fork, by definition, the remainder of the function that fork()'s (in this case, main) executes in both the original process and the newly created process. – Erik Eidt Oct 12 '15 at 23:11
  • Tks! At first I couldnt understand you but now I understand. – Cleber Marques Oct 12 '15 at 23:59
1

Using Erik Eidt's words "When you fork, by definition, the remainder of the function that fork()'s (in this case, main) executes in both the original process and the newly created process."

As Charles wrote, my previous code doesnt check the pid before doing calling the 2nd, or 3rd calls to fork()! The initial process calls the first fork(), then both the parent and the first child call the 2nd fork(), then the original process and each of the 2 children will call the 3rd fork().

So bellow is the correct code for the purpose:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

int main(){

    pid_t IMU1_PID, IMU2_PID, IMU3_PID;

    IMU1_PID=fork();
    if (IMU1_PID<0) { perror("fork"); exit(errno);}
    if(IMU1_PID==0){
        printf("child1's PID: %d - father's PID: %d\n",getpid(),getppid());
        sleep(2);
        exit(0);
    }

    IMU2_PID=fork();
    if (IMU2_PID<0) { perror("fork"); exit(errno);}
    if(IMU2_PID==0){
        printf("child2's PID: %d - father's PID: %d\n",getpid(),getppid());
        sleep(2);
        exit(0);
    }

    IMU3_PID=fork();
    if (IMU3_PID<0) { perror("fork"); exit(errno);}
    if(IMU3_PID==0){
        printf("child3's PID: %d - father's PID: %d\n",getpid(),getppid());
        sleep(2);
        exit(0);
    }

    printf("PARENT %d waiting until all CHILDS end\n",getpid());
    while(wait(NULL)!=-1);
    printf("PARENT %d after all CHILDS ended\n",getpid());

    return 0;
}
0

as clearly explained in the man page for fork(), the function 1) if fails returns -1, 2) if successful, returns to two different processes (each running the original code.) in the parent process, the returned value is the pid of the child process. in the child process, the returned value is 0. The posted code is not checking the returned value, so both the parent(s) and the children are executing any following calls to fork().

Suggest checking the returned values and having the code act appropriately.

for instance:

pid1 = fork();
if( pid1 <0 ) {handle error and exit}
if( pid1 ==0 ) { processing for child1 and exit}
// if got here then parent
pid2 = fork();
if( pid2 <0 ) { handle error and exit }
if( pid2 == 0) { processing for child2 and exit }
// if got here then parent
etc.
  • sorry but I can't see any difference between our logic. What you wrote is exactly what I wrote also. – Cleber Marques Oct 12 '15 at 23:30
  • everything inside the if( pidx == 0 ) is the pidx's owner routine and everything outsite of any if is the father's routine – Cleber Marques Oct 12 '15 at 23:36
  • 1
    @CleberMarques, your code doesn't check the pid before doing calling the 2nd, or 3rd calls to fork()! Your initial process calls the first fork(), both the parent and the first child call the 2nd fork(), the original process and each of the 3 children will call the 3rd fork(). – Charles E. Grant Oct 12 '15 at 23:49
  • @CharlesE.Grant, Tks, now I understand. – Cleber Marques Oct 13 '15 at 0:11

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