3

Can anyone see anything wrong with the ternary in the where of this linq statement:

var organizations = Context.Set<Domain.Content.Organisation>()
                    .Where(x => x.ShowCompanyPage == (showCompanyPagesOnly ? true : x.ShowCompanyPage))

if showCompanyPagesOnly is set to true, I get 4 results, this is correct only four companies have ShowCompanyPage = true.

However if I set it to false, I expect 1000+ results (all companies). But I STILL only get 4.

Is my logic not:

if showCompanyPagesOnly is true, then give me results where  x.ShowCompanyPage == true

else give me results where  x.ShowCompanyPage = whatever is in the column (ie ALL Organisations)

?

x.ShowCompanyPage is a nullable bool column.

Full code:

public Result<IList<Organisation>> GetAllOrganisations(bool showCompanyPagesOnly = false)
    {
        var result = new Result<IList<Organisation>>();

        try
        {
            var organizations = Context.Set<Domain.Content.Organisation>()
                .Where(x => x.ShowCompanyPage == (showCompanyPagesOnly == true ? true : x.ShowCompanyPage)) // show only company pages or show all
                .AsNoTracking()
                .Select(x => new DataContracts.Content.Organisation
                {
                    Id = x.Id,
                    Name = x.Name,
                    OrganisationTypeId = x.OrganisationTypeId,
                    IsCustomer = x.IsCustomer,
                    SeoName = x.SeoName,
                    Description = x.Description,
                    Website = x.Website
                }).OrderBy(x => x.Name).ToList();

            result.Data = organizations;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            result.SetException(ex);
            HandleError(ex);
        }
        return result;

    }
  • seems rather pointless as x.ShowCompanyPage == x.ShowCompanyPage will always be true so what you really have is x.ShowCompanyPage == showCompanyPagesOnly – MikeT Oct 13 '15 at 14:06
  • 1
    @MikeT I dont think you are correct, if showCompanyPagesOnly I want to display ALL at once. The value in the column could be true, false or null. But your suggestion restricts to one value at a time. – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 14:09
  • miss read slightly what you really have is (showCompanyPagesOnly ? true : true ) – MikeT Oct 13 '15 at 14:10
  • let me just check i'm following what you want if showCompanyPagesOnly is true you one want records with ShowCompanyPage = true else you want everything? – MikeT Oct 13 '15 at 14:13
  • @MikeT - exactly - that is the logic i want. Any ideas? – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 14:15
4

Sometimes when logic is getting too complex the best answer is the turn the question upside down, currently you are asking

if showCompanyPagesOnly is true how do i get only the ones with with ShowCompanyPage = true

if you swap that with get everything unless showCompanyPagesOnly is true and your logic becomes a simple OR statement

either showCompanyPagesOnly is not true or ShowCompanyPage is true which is

x => (!showCompanyPagesOnly) || x.ShowCompanyPage

you may need to make that

   x => (!showCompanyPagesOnly) || (x.ShowCompanyPage ?? false)/*default value depends on if you want to treat null as true or false*/)

to take into account the nullability

  • For clarity, I implemented this one and it is correct: x => (!showCompanyPagesOnly) || (x.ShowCompanyPage ?? false) – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 14:57
  • So do we know why this worked, but your original logic did not? Both work when the entity framework is not involved. – Moby Disk Oct 13 '15 at 15:13
  • @MobyDisk - I do not know unfortunately. I was also surprised my original code did not work. I dont have time to debug now, because its a work project, but i might come back to it. – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 16:36
3

This is a much better approach, as it will generate two distinct LINQ queries, and this will allow SQL Server to generate two distinct query plans, which can in most cases greatly affect the performance of the queries:

public Result<IList<Organisation>> GetAllOrganisations(bool showCompanyPagesOnly = false)
{
    var result = new Result<IList<Organisation>>();

    try
    {
        var organizations = Context.Set<Domain.Content.Organisation>()
            .AsNoTracking();

        if (showCompanyPagesOnly)
            organizations=organization
            .Where(x => x.ShowCompanyPage == true);

        result.Data = organizations
            .Select(x => new DataContracts.Content.Organisation
            {
                Id = x.Id,
                Name = x.Name,
                OrganisationTypeId = x.OrganisationTypeId,
                IsCustomer = x.IsCustomer,
                SeoName = x.SeoName,
                Description = x.Description,
                Website = x.Website
            }).OrderBy(x => x.Name).ToList();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        result.SetException(ex);
        HandleError(ex);
    }
    return result;

}
  • +1 This is exactly what I would do. But Robert, from curiosity, I'm wondering if this really is needed - shouldn't Linq provider eliminate the constant expression paths and generate different sql requests if the simple condition like in the other (typical) answers is used? – Ivan Stoev Oct 13 '15 at 16:22
  • @robert-mckee thank you for this solution. Can you explain why generating two queries in this case is better? My possible lack of understanding makes me wonder is it not bad to hit the DB twice? – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 16:38
  • @robert-mckee Ah ok, I am starting to realize you dont hit the DB twice. Its only hit once per method call, but there are two different queries generated depending on if showCompanyPagesOnly is true or false, thus the execution path advantage. – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 16:41
  • @IvanStoev The Linq provider isn't that smart. It'll parameterize the constant, and pass it on to SQL Server, which will then use parameter sniffing to generate a query plan. Unfortunately, SQL Server will then re-use that same query plan even if the parameters change, leading to some very unoptimal performance. Google "SQL Server parameter sniffing" for more details. The details are far too detailed to fit into a comment (or even an answer). – Robert McKee Oct 13 '15 at 16:49
  • @fourbeatcoder Correct, it still only hits the DB once per call, but the queries are different which allows SQL Server to have two separate query plans associated with them (One query where ..==true, the other without a where clause) – Robert McKee Oct 13 '15 at 16:54
1

Try this:

.Where(x => showCompanyPagesOnly ? x.ShowCompanyPage == true : true)

Here is a fiddle.

The Where() function returns records that satisfy the condition, so the condition must evaluate to a Boolean (i.e. either true or false). If you put the value true in the condition, then you're effectively asking the Where() function to return all records. It is similar to:

if(true){
    //do something.
}

As you know this will always execute the "do something".

  • Unfortunately your suggestion causes a build error: Cannot implicitly convert type 'bool?' to 'bool'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?) – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 14:14
  • @stuartd your suggested solution causes an error: LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method 'Boolean GetValueOrDefault()' method, and this method cannot be translated into a store expression. – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 14:25
  • @RacilHilan I dont think your edited solution is correct, if showCompanyPagesOnly is false I want to display ALL at once. The value in the column could be true, false or null. But your suggestion restricts to one value at a time. – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 14:27
  • No, your understanding of the condition is incorrect. This the exact meaning: If showCompanyPagesOnly is true then return companies that have their x.ShowCompanyPage set to true. If showCompanyPagesOnly is false, return everything. I will add an explanation and a fiddle to my answer. – Racil Hilan Oct 13 '15 at 14:33
  • @RacilHilan - thank you for the explanation. You are correct and your edited solution works. However mikeT answered correctly just before you did by 3 minutes and i accepted that answer. I have up-voted yours. – fourbeatcoder Oct 13 '15 at 14:52

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