11

The following does not compile:

template<void *p>
class X {
// ...
};

int r;

int main()
{
    X<&r> x;

    return 0;
}

The error message is

x.cc:10:6: error: could not convert template argument ‘& r’ to ‘void*’

Explicitly casting &r to (void *) doesn't help either. The error message becomes:

x.cc:10:14: error: could not convert template argument ‘(void*)(& r)’ to ‘void*’

Which part of the standard specifies that behaviour? The GCC version is gcc version 5.2.1 20151003 (Ubuntu 5.2.1-21ubuntu2)

Edit:

Please note that using e.g. int * instead of void * works as expected.

Edit: (answering myself)

It does not work with gcc HEAD 6.0.0 20151016 (experimental) when specifying -std=c++1z, neither with implicit nor with explicit casting to "void *".

It does work with clang HEAD 3.8.0 (trunk 250513) and has been since (at least) clang 3.6.0 (tags/RELEASE_360/final) when specifying --std=c++1z and explicitly casting to *void *". Without the explicit cast, clang complains as follows:

x.cc:10:7: error: conversion from 'int *' to 'void *' is not allowed in a converted constant expression

Responsible for fixing this bug in the c++ language specification is N4268 which clang already implements.

3
  • I don't see how this could be a duplicate of the mentioned question. This is exclusively about using "void *" as a template argument, the other one is about using "const char *" as a template argument.
    – apriori
    Oct 13, 2015 at 18:48
  • Technically, [temp.param]/p4 bans using void* as template non-type parameters, though no major compiler I know of actually enforces this prohibition or even issues a diagnostic.
    – T.C.
    Oct 17, 2015 at 0:06
  • Ok, that's interesting. To which document are you referring to?
    – apriori
    Oct 17, 2015 at 0:26

2 Answers 2

1

Normally, there is a conversion allowed for any pointer to void*.

[C++11, 4.10/2] A prvalue of type “pointer to cv T,” where T is an object type, can be converted to a prvalue of type “pointer to cv void”. The result of converting a “pointer to cv T” to a “pointer to cv void” points to the start of the storage location where the object of type T resides, as if the object is a most derived object (1.8) of type T (that is, not a base class subobject). The null pointer value is converted to the null pointer value of the destination type.

However, for non-type template arguments, certain conversions are specified:

[C++11, 14.3.2/5] The following conversions are performed on each expression used as a non-type template-argument. If a non-type template-argument cannot be converted to the type of the corresponding template-parameter then the program is ill-formed.

[...]

— for a non-type template-parameter of type pointer to object, qualification conversions (4.4) and the array-to-pointer conversion (4.2) are applied; if the template-argument is of type std::nullptr_t, the null pointer conversion (4.10) is applied. [...]

By omission, we can reason this conversion is simply not allowed.

1
  • 1
    I cannot think of any reason for this inconsistency. To me, this is a bug.
    – apriori
    Oct 13, 2015 at 17:51
1

I can't quote you the chapter and verse off the top of my head (edits are welcome), but what you are trying to do is not allowed in c++.

Template parameters must be known at compile time. Pointers are only resolved at link time unless:

  1. they are defaulted using = nullptr in the template argument list.

  2. they are member function pointers (which are known at compile time since they are merely offsets).

for example, this will compile:

template<void * = nullptr>
class X {
    // ...
};

int r;

int main()
{
    X<nullptr> x;

    return 0;
}
2
  • 1
    No, replace "void *" with "int *" and the code example compiles.
    – apriori
    Oct 13, 2015 at 18:30
  • I just want to add that when using this with type traits and the like the syntax is not easy to figure out. Here's an example how to use it with std::enable_if: template <typename T, typename std::enable_if<sizeof(T) == 4, T>::type* = nullptr> void do_if_ptrs_are_32bit(void * p) {}
    – Bim
    Dec 18, 2019 at 10:49

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