257

In my component's render function I have:

render() {
    const items = ['EN', 'IT', 'FR', 'GR', 'RU'].map((item) => {
      return (<li onClick={this.onItemClick.bind(this, item)} key={item}>{item}</li>);
    });
    return (
      <div>
        ...
                <ul>
                  {items}
                </ul>
         ...
      </div>
    );
  }

everything renders fine, however when clicking the <li> element I receive the following error:

Uncaught Error: Invariant Violation: Objects are not valid as a React child (found: object with keys {dispatchConfig, dispatchMarker, nativeEvent, target, currentTarget, type, eventPhase, bubbles, cancelable, timeStamp, defaultPrevented, isTrusted, view, detail, screenX, screenY, clientX, clientY, ctrlKey, shiftKey, altKey, metaKey, getModifierState, button, buttons, relatedTarget, pageX, pageY, isDefaultPrevented, isPropagationStopped, _dispatchListeners, _dispatchIDs}). If you meant to render a collection of children, use an array instead or wrap the object using createFragment(object) from the React add-ons. Check the render method of Welcome.

If I change to this.onItemClick.bind(this, item) to (e) => onItemClick(e, item) inside the map function everything works as expected.

If someone could explain what I am doing wrong and explain why do I get this error, would be great

UPDATE 1:
onItemClick function is as follows and removing this.setState results in error disappearing.

onItemClick(e, item) {
    this.setState({
      lang: item,
    });
}

But I cannot remove this line as I need to update state of this component

  • 2
    So how this.onItemClick is implemented? – zerkms Oct 14 '15 at 5:54
  • @zerkms Thanks for replying, I updated the question, and yes it seems that the problem is in this.setState(), but why does it throw this error? :( – almeynman Oct 14 '15 at 6:11
  • Is there a syntax error in setState? An extra comma? Might not fix the error, but just found it. – Bhargav Ponnapalli Oct 14 '15 at 6:12
  • @bhargavponnapalli comma is a matter of preference, my eslint forces me to do that, but removing it does not help, thanks for reply – almeynman Oct 14 '15 at 6:18
  • I got this error when I forgot curly braces around a variable that had become a state-ful object from local variable after adding it to state in refactor. – jamescampbell Oct 22 '18 at 3:42

31 Answers 31

332

I was having this error and it turned out to be that I was unintentionally including an Object in my JSX code that I had expected to be a string value:

return (
    <BreadcrumbItem href={routeString}>
        {breadcrumbElement}
    </BreadcrumbItem>
)

breadcrumbElement used to be a string but due to a refactor had become an Object. Unfortunately, React's error message didn't do a good job in pointing me to the line where the problem existed. I had to follow my stack trace all the way back up until I recognized the "props" being passed into a component and then I found the offending code.

You'll need to either reference a property of the object that is a string value or convert the Object to a string representation that is desirable. One option might be JSON.stringify if you actually want to see the contents of the Object.

  • 9
    So, if you do have an object, how would you go about transforming it into something desirable? – adinutzyc21 Nov 27 '16 at 5:52
  • 2
    You'll need to either reference a property of the object that is a string value or convert the Object to a string representation that is desirable. One option might be JSON.stringify if you actually want to see the contents of the Object. – Code Commander Nov 28 '16 at 3:20
  • ah yes :D...... – Basheer Ahmed Dec 6 '17 at 4:57
  • 1
    Encountered same error and this explaination solved my issue. 1 UP for this. :) – sack Nov 7 '18 at 3:36
  • Ahh, I had the same issue of the error message pointing at the wrong line - it said the error was in this.setState({items: items}) when really it blew up further down where I was trying to display that variable using {this.state.items}. JSON.stringify fixed it! – RubberDuckRabbit Feb 9 at 7:17
87

So I got this error when trying to display the createdAt property which is a Date object. If you concatenate .toString() on the end like this, it will do the conversion and eliminate the error. Just posting this as a possible answer in case anyone else ran into the same problem:

{this.props.task.createdAt.toString()}
  • 2
    Bingo! I had this problem but was thrown off track because the table that was displaying it would load (and reload) just fine. React would only throw the objects are not valid invariant violation when I added a row. Turns out I was converting the Date() object to a string before persisting it so only my new rows had objects for the created date. :( Learn from my wayward example people! – Steve May 7 '16 at 16:05
  • 2
    Thanks for this! – Channox May 16 '18 at 6:39
29

I just got the same error but due to a different mistake: I used double braces like:

{{count}}

to insert the value of count instead of the correct:

{count}

which the compiler presumably turned into {{count: count}}, i.e. trying to insert an Object as a React child.

  • 3
    what {{}} are meant for/ – Muneem Habib Nov 28 '16 at 0:28
  • 3
    @MuneemHabib it's just ES6 syntax. React needs one pair of {}. The inner pair is treat as ES6 code. In ES6, {count} is the same as {count: count}. So when you type {{count}}, that is exactly the same as { {count: count} }. – Dogbert Aug 2 '17 at 15:47
  • 1
    Had this error -- this was the problem. In assigning my variable to state in the constructor I had this.state = {navMenuItems: {navMenu}}; ... which basically turned my JSX navMenu into a generic object. Changing to this.state = {navMenuItems: navMenu}; got rid of the unintentional 'cast' to Object and fixed the issue. – lowcrawler Jul 1 '18 at 16:53
24

Just thought I would add to this as I had the same problem today, turns out that it was because I was returning just the function, when I wrapped it in a <div> tag it started working, as below

renderGallery() {
  const gallerySection = galleries.map((gallery, i) => {
    return (
      <div>
        ...
      </div>
    );
  });
  return (
    {gallerySection}
  );
}

The above caused the error. I fixed the problem by changing the return() section to:

return (
  <div>
    {gallerySection}
  </div>
);

...or simply:

return gallerySection
  • 7
    or you can simply use return gallerySection if you want to avoid an extra div – Vishal Nov 11 '17 at 15:21
  • 4
    Returning gallerySection instead of <div>{gallerySection}</div> helped me. – Zanon Jan 12 '18 at 11:27
12

Mine had to do with unnecessarily putting curly braces around a variable holding a HTML element inside the return statement of the render() function. This made React treat it as an object rather than an element.

render() {
  let element = (
    <div className="some-class">
      <span>Some text</span>
    </div>
  );

  return (
    {element}
  )
}

Once I removed the curly braces from the element, the error was gone, and the element was rendered correctly.

9

Mine had to do with forgetting the curly braces around props being sent to a presentational component:

Before:

const TypeAheadInput = (name, options, onChange, value, error) => {

After

const TypeAheadInput = ({name, options, onChange, value, error}) => {
  • My problem was most similar to yours, so applying your solution helped me. +1 and Thanks! – m1gp0z Jun 7 at 21:45
7

For anybody using Firebase with Android, this only breaks Android. My iOS emulation ignores it.

And as posted by Apoorv Bankey above.

Anything above Firebase V5.0.3, for Android, atm is a bust. Fix:

npm i --save firebase@5.0.3

Confirmed numerous times here https://github.com/firebase/firebase-js-sdk/issues/871

  • For anybody attempting the solution proposed by KNDheeraj below, **** 1 down vote If in case your using Firebase any of the files within your project. Then just place that import firebase statement at the end!! I know this sounds crazy but try it!! **************** I did try it and this is not a solution for iOS but for Android on Windows only. – RedEarth Jul 31 '18 at 9:18
7

React child(singular) should be type of primitive data type not object or it could be JSX tag(which is not in our case). Use Proptypes package in development to make sure validation happens.

Just a quick code snippet(JSX) comparision to represent you with idea :

  1. Error : With object being passed into child

    <div>
    {/* item is object with user's name and its other details on it */}
     {items.map((item, index) => {
      return <div key={index}>
    --item object is passed which is error--->>>{item}</div>;
     })}
    </div>
    
  2. Without error : With object's property(which should be primitive, i.e. a string value or integer value) being passed into child.

    <div>
     {/* item is object with user's name and its other details on it */}
      {items.map((item, index) => {
       return <div key={index}>
    --note the name property is primitive--->{item.name}</div>;
      })}
    </div>
    

TLDR; (From the source below) : Make sure all of the items you're rendering in JSX are primitives and not objects when using React. This error usually happens because a function involved in dispatching an event has been given an unexpected object type (i.e passing an object when you should be passing a string) or part of the JSX in your component is not referencing a primitive (i.e. this.props vs this.props.name).

Source - codingbismuth.com

  • 2
    this link no longer works, however I find the structure of your answer to be the most informative in my use case. This error is produceable in both web and react native environments, and often occures as a lifecycle error when attempting to .map() an array of objects within a component using async lifecycle. I came across this thread while using react native react-native-scrollview – mibbit Jun 17 at 20:31
  • Glad, that you find it useful and thanks for flagging link issue. – Meet Zaveri Jun 24 at 5:15
4

If for some reason you imported firebase. Then try running npm i --save firebase@5.0.3. This is because firebase break react-native, so running this will fix it.

4

I also have the same problem but my mistake is so stupid. I was trying to access object directly.

class App extends Component {
    state = {
        name:'xyz',
        age:10
    }
    render() {
        return (
            <div className="App">
                // this is what I am using which gives the error
                <p>I am inside the {state}.</p> 

                //Correct Way is

                <p>I am inside the {this.state.name}.</p> 
            </div>
        );
    }                                                                             

}
2

You were just using the keys of object, instead of the whole object!

More details can be found here: https://github.com/gildata/RAIO/issues/48

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import PropTypes from 'prop-types';

class SCT extends Component {
    constructor(props, context) {
        super(props, context);
        this.state = {
            data: this.props.data,
            new_data: {}
        };
    }
    componentDidMount() {
        let new_data = this.state.data;
        console.log(`new_data`, new_data);
        this.setState(
            {
                new_data: Object.assign({}, new_data)
            }
        )
    }
    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                this.state.data = {JSON.stringify(this.state.data)}
                <hr/>
                <div style={{color: 'red'}}>
                    {this.state.new_data.name}<br />
                    {this.state.new_data.description}<br />
                    {this.state.new_data.dependtables}<br />
                </div>
            </div>
        );
    }
}

SCT.propTypes = {
    test: PropTypes.string,
    data: PropTypes.object.isRequired
};

export {SCT};
export default SCT;
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

2

Something like this has just happened to me...

I wrote:

{response.isDisplayOptions &&
{element}
}

Placing it inside a div fixed it:

{response.isDisplayOptions &&
    <div>
        {element}
    </div>
}
2

In my case it was i forgot to return a html element frm the render function and i was returning an object . What i did was i just wrapped the {items} with a html element - a simple div like below

<ul>{items}</ul>

1

I'd like to add another solution to this list.

Specs:

  • "react": "^16.2.0",
  • "react-dom": "^16.2.0",
  • "react-redux": "^5.0.6",
  • "react-scripts": "^1.0.17",
  • "redux": "^3.7.2"

I encountered the same error:

Uncaught Error: Objects are not valid as a React child (found: object with keys {XXXXX}). If you meant to render a collection of children, use an array instead.

This was my code:

let payload = {
      guess: this.userInput.value
};

this.props.dispatch(checkAnswer(payload));

Solution:

  // let payload = {
  //   guess: this.userInput.value
  // };

this.props.dispatch(checkAnswer(this.userInput.value));

The problem was occurring because the payload was sending the item as an object. When I removed the payload variable and put the userInput value into the dispatch everything started working as expected.

1

If in case your using Firebase any of the files within your project. Then just place that import firebase statement at the end!!

I know this sounds crazy but try it!!

  • This works for android emulator – Paixols Jun 27 '18 at 1:04
1

I have the same issue, in my case, I update the redux state, and new data parameters did not match old parameters, So when I want to access some parameters it through this Error,

Maybe this experience help someone

  • In my case, (Django) ListSerializer and CreateSerializer return same fields and some of them (it's up to your project) are just read-only fields, So fetch Once and whenever create new data just simply update the redux state – MohammadMasoumi Aug 18 '18 at 10:42
1

My issue was simple when i faced the following error:

objects are not valid as a react child (found object with keys {...}

was just that I was passing an object with keys specified in the error while trying to render the object directly in a component using {object} expecting it to be a string

object: {
    key1: "key1",
    key2: "key2"
}

while rendering on a React Component, I used something like below

render() {
    return this.props.object;
}

but it should have been

render() {
    return this.props.object.key1;
}
1

If using stateless components, follow this kind of format:

const Header = ({pageTitle}) => (
  <h1>{pageTitle}</h1>
);
export {Header};

This seemed to work for me

1

If you are using Firebase and seeing this error, it's worth to check if you're importing it right. As of version 5.0.4 you have to import it like this:

import firebase from '@firebase/app'
import '@firebase/auth';
import '@firebase/database';
import '@firebase/storage';

Yes, I know. I lost 45 minutes on this, too.

  • Thank you. It solved my problem with firebase (5.9.2) :) – Mate Mar 31 at 17:30
1

I too was getting this "Objects are not valid as a React child" error and for me the cause was due to calling an asynchronous function in my JSX. See below.

class App extends React.Component {
    showHello = async () => {
        const response = await someAPI.get("/api/endpoint");

        // Even with response ignored in JSX below, this JSX is not immediately returned, 
        // causing "Objects are not valid as a React child" error.
        return (<div>Hello!</div>);
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                {this.showHello()}
            </div>
        );
    }
}

What I learned is that asynchronous rendering is not supported in React. The React team is working on a solution as documented here.

Ken

0

I just put myself through a really silly version of this error, which I may as well share here for posterity.

I had some JSX like this:

...
{
  ...
  <Foo />
  ...
}
...

I needed to comment this out to debug something. I used the keyboard shortcut in my IDE, which resulted in this:

...
{
  ...
  { /* <Foo /> */ }
  ...
}
...

Which is, of course, invalid -- objects are not valid as react children!

0

In case of using Firebase, if it doesn't work by putting at the end of import statements then you can try to put that inside one of the life-cycle method, that is, you can put it inside componentWillMount().

componentWillMount() {
    const firebase = require('firebase');
    firebase.initializeApp({
        //Credentials
    });
}
0

Invariant Violation: Objects are not valid as a React child happened to me when using a component that needed a renderItem props, like:

renderItem={this.renderItem}

and my mistake was to make my renderItem method async.

0

My error was because of writing it this way:

props.allinfo.map((stuff, i)=>{
  return (<p key={i}> I am {stuff} </p>)
})



instead of:

props.allinfo.map((stuff, i)=>{
  return (<p key={i}> I am {stuff.name} </p>)
})

It meant I was trying to render object instead of the value within it.

edit: this is for react not native.

0

My issue was very particular: in my .env file, I put a comment in the line that had my api url:

API_URL=https://6ec1259f.ngrok.io #comment

I'd get the Invariant violation error when trying to log in/sign up, as the api url was wrong.

0
try{
    throw new Error(<p>An error occured</p>)
}catch(e){
    return (e)
}

The above code produced the error, I then rewrote it like this:

try{
    throw(<p>An error occured</p>)
}catch(e){
    return (e)
}

Take note of the removal of new Error() in the try block...

A better way to write the code in order to avoid this error message Expected an object to be thrown no-throw-literal is to pass a string into throw new Error() instead of JSX and return JSX in your catch block, something like this:

try{
    throw new Error("An error occurred")
}catch(e){
    return (
        <p>{e.message}</p>
    )
}
0
  1. What's happening is the onClick function you are trying to implement gets executed immediately.

  2. As our code is not HTML it is javascript so it is interpreted as a function execution.

  3. onClick function takes a function as argument not an function execution.

const items = ['EN', 'IT', 'FR', 'GR', 'RU'].map((item) => { return (<li onClick={(e) => onItemClick(e, item)} key={item}>{item}</li>); });

this will define an onClick function on List Item that will get executed after clicking on it not as soon as our component renders.

0

Obviously, as others have mentioned previously in this thread, in React JSX props.children cannot be of type Object. This is NOT the root cause for the issue in your specific question.

If you carefully read the error text, you will see that React has produced the error while trying to render an Object that matches the signature of a SyntheticEvent:

Uncaught Error: Invariant Violation: Objects are not valid as a React child (found: object with keys {dispatchConfig, dispatchMarker, nativeEvent, target, currentTarget, type, eventPhase, bubbles, cancelable, timeStamp, defaultPrevented, isTrusted, view, detail, screenX, screenY, clientX, clientY, ctrlKey, shiftKey, altKey, metaKey, getModifierState, button, buttons, relatedTarget, pageX, pageY, isDefaultPrevented, isPropagationStopped, _dispatchListeners, _dispatchIDs}). If you meant to render a collection of children, use an array instead or wrap the object using createFragment(object) from the React add-ons. Check the render method of Welcome.

However, one wonders why you are trying to render a SyntheticEvent, and this is where the real answer to your question resides. You obviously have no intention of rendering a SyntheticEvent, but you've got your event handler parameters out of order.

In your render method, you are binding the onItemClick event handler to the this of your class component and passing in item as an argument:

render() {
    const items = ['EN', 'IT', 'FR', 'GR', 'RU'].map((item) => {
      return (<li onClick={this.onItemClick.bind(this, item)} key={item}>{item}</li>);
    });
// ...

According to the documentation for Function.prototype.bind, all arguments passed after the thisArg are prepended to any arguments subsequently passed when the target function is later invoked:

arg1, arg2, ...

Arguments to prepend to arguments provided to the bound function when invoking the target function.

If we then look at the event handler, we see that the parameter e is listed before the parameter item.

onItemClick(e, item) {
    this.setState({
      lang: item,
    });
}

When onItemClick(e, item) is invoked, the item passed in during the bind invocation will precede the triggering event, so parameter e will be set to the mapped and bound item, and parameter item will be set to the event.

When setState is called, lang will be set to the SyntheticEvent representing the triggering onClick event, and when you try to render the value in this.state.lang elsewhere, you will receive the Invariant Violation error you've seen.

0

Found: object with keys

Which means you passing something is a key-value so you need to modify your handler.

from

onItemClick(e, item) {
   this.setState({
     lang: item,
   });
}

To

onItemClick({e, item}) {
   this.setState({
     lang: item,
   });
}

You missed out the braces ({}).

0

Just create a valid JSX element. In my case I assigned a component to an object.

const AwesomeButtonComponent = () => <button>AwesomeButton</button>
const next = {
  link: "http://awesomeLink.com",
  text: "Awesome text",
  comp: AwesomeButtonComponent
}

Somewhere else in my Code I wanted to dynamically assign that button.

return (
  <div>
    {next.comp ? next.comp : <DefaultAwesomeButtonComp/>}
  </div>
)

I solve this by declaring a JSX comp which I initialized via the props comp.

const AwesomeBtnFromProps = next.comp
return (
  <div>
    {next.comp ? <AwesomeBtnFromProps/> : <DefaultAwesomeButtonComp/>}
  </div>
)

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