19

Our website is localized using a bunch of JSON files with translations (one file per language). The content of the files looks like this:

{
    "Password": "Passwort",
    "Tables": "Tische"
}

Many team members edit these JSON files at the same time, adding new phrases and editing existing ones, and we get lots of conflicts even though people are changing different lines.

Is there a way to set up git in such a way that would help avoid merge conflicts?

P.S. I've found this script to help merge locally: https://gist.github.com/jphaas/ad7823b3469aac112a52. However, I'm interested in a solution that would fix the problem for everyone in the team (even for persons who edit JSONs through GitHub's web-interface).

12
  • 1
    Here is an article which might help. – Tim Biegeleisen Oct 14 '15 at 10:07
  • 3
    Um, if all of your developers are all modifying these files at different times, at different line locations, with different contents, I don't see any way that you could avoid conflicts. Dealing with merge conflicts is just part of the nature of working with a distributed, asynchronous workflow. I think the only way you can avoid it 100% is to have each developer wait for other developers to finish modifying a file before they modify it themselves...but then that defeats the whole purpose of using a distributed VCS like Git. – user456814 Oct 16 '15 at 11:10
  • 1
    Ok, so after I thought about it, the single most effective way to avoid merge conflicts is to have your developers sync with upstream changes very frequently before they make and commit their own local changes. But it sounds like that's not what your team is doing, especially if they're making changes through GitHub directly. You could have them make pull requests more frequently between each other, but then that starts getting really taxing if all you're doing is committing one line changes at a time, not to mention polluting your commit history with a ton of complicated merge commits. – user456814 Oct 16 '15 at 11:12
  • 1
    If you want to maintain a cleaner history (without the merge commits), your team would need to get into the habit of rebasing their local changes with upstream changes on their own local machines. As far as I know, the GitHub interface doesn't let you do rebasing, only classic merging. – user456814 Oct 16 '15 at 11:14
  • 1
    This might tangentially help: stackoverflow.com/questions/5587626/git-merging-within-a-line It seems to me (as NikoNyrh also suspected) git doesn't recognize chunk boundaries as granularly as you would want. git-diff has --word-diff option, which can be helpful before/after merge. One option could be using external tool for merging, e.g. wiggle as suggested on unix.stackexchange.com/questions/20021/… – Jari Keinänen Oct 23 '15 at 7:54
16
+100

we get lots of conflicts even though people are changing different lines

This shouldn't be the case, you only get conflicts if same line is modified by different people, committed and then later merged.

Oh, I actually tried this out and encountered some odd problems.

Commit 1 (master):

{
    "a": "1",
    "b": "2",
    "c": "3",
    "d": "4",
    "e": "5",
    "f": "6",
    "g": "7"
}

Commit 2 (tmp)

{
    "A": "1",
    "B": "2",
    "C": "3",
    "d": "4",
    "e": "5",
    "f": "6",
    "g": "7"
}

Commit 3 (master):

{
    "a": "1",
    "b": "2",
    "c": "3",
    "d": "4",
    "E": "5",
    "F": "6",
    "G": "7"
}

git merge tmp: correct result

{
    "A": "1",
    "B": "2",
    "C": "3",
    "d": "4",
    "E": "5",
    "F": "6",
    "G": "7"
}

However I get conflicts if also row "d" was modified, maybe git wasn't able to establish diff boundaries. My stupid suggestion to avoid this stupid git behavior is to add "padding" to the JSON file (ugly, isn't it? But no more conflicts):

{
    "a": "1",

    "b": "2",

    "c": "3",

    "d": "4",

    "e": "5",

    "f": "6",

    "g": "7"
}
2
  • Interesting! We should try that! I'll let you know if it works for us. Thanks! – katspaugh Oct 22 '15 at 12:10
  • 1
    I was able to reproduce a conflict with your test case and padding with newlines resolves it indeed! Thank you for actually trying and finding an easy-to-implement solution! – katspaugh Oct 22 '15 at 20:01
7

One thing I would do in such a scenario would be to maintain the configurations in a database table instead of a JSON file - if they change all that frequently. As others have already pointed out, there is not much you can do to avoid conflicts if you have that high number of changes happening to the config all the time. Your example anyway looks more like a mapping between word in English and some other language, so a three column table should suffice.

The JSON file, if needed could be generated either on the fly every time or generated once during deployment for each server from the database table.

2
  • 1
    It would be a nice solution, didn't think about it! Thank you! – katspaugh Oct 18 '15 at 19:19
  • @katspaugh Happy to help :) – Anshul Goyal Oct 19 '15 at 8:19
3

Another reason, why you see so many conflicts could be that your developers are using different line ending configurations. See How to change line-ending settings in Git. In order to find out, you can open a json file with a Hex editor and see if all line endings are consistent across the whole file.

0
1

You could run git pull --rebase. That way when someone else has edited your JSON file, git will first pull their changes, then try to apply your changes on top of theirs. There is an option to do this every time: just put your branch name in place of BRANCH and run this: git config branch.BRANCH.rebase true

0
-2

For example, there are 2 developers (developer A and B) work in a project. I will create 2 translation files: A.json and B.json. A.json is for developer A, B.json is for developer B. And I will create the translation file named en_US.json. en_US.json is ignored in .gitignore file.

So the structure of the translation directory as below:

$ tree . -a
.
├── A.json
├── B.json
├── en_US.json
└── .gitignore

So now, I have to create a task to combine all JSON files to en_US.json. It is easier if you are running a Javascript project. I suggest you use grunt or gulp to run the task. For example, you can refer to https://www.npmjs.com/package/grunt-merge-json or https://www.npmjs.com/package/grunt-concat-json

2
  • 1
    What if A and B add the same keys? – manojlds Oct 16 '15 at 12:04
  • It belongs the script you define in your tasks – Nguyen Sy Thanh Son Oct 16 '15 at 12:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.