103

I have an helper class with some static functions. All the functions in the class require a ‘heavy’ initialization function to run once (as if it were a constructor).

Is there a good practice for achieving this?

The only thing I thought of was calling an init function, and breaking its flow if it has already run once (using a static $initialized var). The problem is that I need to call it on every one of the class’s functions.

3
  • 4
    Under discussion is the Static Class Constructor RFC, which would offer an alternative approach.
    – bishop
    Feb 26 '16 at 19:41
  • 3
    Future readers: Here are code details and a discussion of the approach user258626 said he was thinking of doing. Please compare it to the accepted answer. Decide which you'd rather have. Or do one of the other answers; I am suggesting you not blindly adopt the accepted answer. Key point: As a general principle, it is best to pay the coding price once, when you code a class, to keep callers simpler. Apr 12 '19 at 20:12
  • I wish we could refactor SO, put the accepted answer into a new question “What does the Singleton pattern look like in PHP?” (for which it’s an excellent answer) and make user258626’s answer (or something like it) the accepted answer to this question. Jul 22 at 7:29
125

Sounds like you'd be better served by a singleton rather than a bunch of static methods

class Singleton
{
  /**
   * 
   * @var Singleton
   */
  private static $instance;

  private function __construct()
  {
    // Your "heavy" initialization stuff here
  }

  public static function getInstance()
  {
    if ( is_null( self::$instance ) )
    {
      self::$instance = new self();
    }
    return self::$instance;
  }

  public function someMethod1()
  {
    // whatever
  }

  public function someMethod2()
  {
    // whatever
  }
}

And then, in usage

// As opposed to this
Singleton::someMethod1();

// You'd do this
Singleton::getInstance()->someMethod1();
21
  • 4
    I want to -1 (but I won't) for private constructor and getInstance()... You're going to make it VERY hard to test effectively... At least make it protected so that you have options...
    – ircmaxell
    Jul 22 '10 at 20:31
  • 17
    @ircmaxell - you're just talking about issues with the singleton pattern itself, really. And code posted by anybody on SO shouldn't be considered authoritative - especially simple examples that are only meant to be illustrative. Everyone's scenarios and situations are different Jul 22 '10 at 20:47
  • 18
    20 whole lines??!?!? Jeez, doesn't the author of this answer know that lines of code are a precious resource?!? They don't grow on trees ya know! Nov 15 '12 at 17:53
  • 11
    @PeterBailey Lines of code that don't accomplish anything but glue are a distraction and makes code less maintainable.
    – Ekevoo
    Nov 19 '12 at 3:07
  • 16
    @ekevoo I'm not the author of the Singleton Pattern, you know. Don't kill the messenger. Nov 19 '12 at 17:01
99
// file Foo.php
class Foo
{
  static function init() { /* ... */ }
}

Foo::init();

This way, the initialization happens when the class file is included. You can make sure this only happens when necessary (and only once) by using autoloading.

7
  • 3
    I don't understand your question. All the above happens in the included file. Jul 22 '10 at 20:12
  • 1
    @VictorNicollet, this is ugly. Your code makes init a public method, and it wouldn't work if it's private. Isn't there a cleaner way like the java static class initializer?
    – Pacerier
    Aug 7 '13 at 9:28
  • 2
    @Pacerier if init() does nothing the second time it is invoked, it really doesn't matter if it is public... static function init() { if(self::$inited) return; /* ... */ } Jul 27 '15 at 14:10
  • 1
    @Pacerier the end result of any constructor or initializer that accepts arguments is ingesting out-of-scope data into the class. you've got to handle it somewhere. Aug 27 '15 at 12:50
  • 1
    This is what I've been doing for years, but I recently found out that the Foo::init(); line somehow doesn't get picked up for code coverage using phpunit.phar --coverage-html
    – Jeff
    Mar 20 '19 at 15:30
57

Actually, I use a public static method __init__() on my static classes that require initialization (or at least need to execute some code). Then, in my autoloader, when it loads a class it checks is_callable($class, '__init__'). If it is, it calls that method. Quick, simple and effective...

4
  • 2
    That would be my suggestion too. I did the same in the past but called it __initStatic(). It feels like a thing PHP needs, knowing Java.
    – drealecs
    Oct 10 '13 at 20:15
  • 3
    For those of us using composer: I found this: packagist.org/packages/vladimmi/construct-static Sep 30 '15 at 4:21
  • @iautomation Didn't tried it but this is worth to be placed in an own answer! It is a straightforward and modern approach.
    – robsch
    Jan 29 '16 at 8:27
  • For those working in a professional production environment where composer is bile of the internet... this answer works very well. Feb 4 '20 at 19:58
7

NOTE: This is exactly what OP said they did. (But didn't show code for.) I show the details here, so that you can compare it to the accepted answer. My point is that OP's original instinct was, IMHO, better than the answer he accepted.


Given how highly upvoted the accepted answer is, I'd like to point out the "naive" answer to one-time initialization of static methods, is hardly more code than that implementation of Singleton -- and has an essential advantage.

final class MyClass  {
    public static function someMethod1() {
        MyClass::init();
        // whatever
    }

    public static function someMethod2() {
        MyClass::init();
        // whatever
    }


    private static $didInit = false;

    private static function init() {
        if (!self::$didInit) {
            self::$didInit = true;
            // one-time init code.
        }
    }

    // private, so can't create an instance.
    private function __construct() {
        // Nothing to do - there are no instances.
    }
}

The advantage of this approach, is that you get to call with the straightforward static function syntax:

MyClass::someMethod1();

Contrast it to the calls required by the accepted answer:

MyClass::getInstance->someMethod1();

As a general principle, it is best to pay the coding price once, when you code a class, to keep callers simpler.


If you are NOT using PHP 7.4's opcode.cache, then use Victor Nicollet's answer. Simple. No extra coding required. No "advanced" coding to understand. (I recommend including FrancescoMM's comment, to make sure "init" will never execute twice.) See Szczepan's explanation of why Victor's technique won't work with opcode.cache.

If you ARE using opcode.cache, then AFAIK my answer is as clean as you can get. The cost is simply adding the line MyClass::init(); at start of every public method. NOTE: If you want public properties, code them as a get / set pair of methods, so that you have a place to add that init call.

(Private members do NOT need that init call, as they are not reachable from the outside - so some public method has already been called, by the time execution reaches the private member.)

6
  • 1
    I prefer this because the class is self-contained. I only put the test in methods that might be the first ones called. Note that the test property can be one that needs to be initialised using code, by making it false, then a method can call the init() when it is false, else use the property's value.
    – Patanjali
    Nov 6 '19 at 4:15
  • 1
    @Patanjali - I recommend using a dedicated property static $didInit, rather than depending on some property specific to the class. This makes the code more obvious (and consistent if you use the same technique in multiple classes). The extra memory cost is negligible, as it is a single static property per class (if you do create instances of the class, it doesn't make the instances larger, it is on the class itself). Feb 16 '20 at 4:32
  • 1
    (@)ToolmakerSteve. I agree if you are wanting a generic mechanism, as it is better to be consistent. However, if not all properties can be initialised at the same time, because the class values are built up through other processes, then doing the relevant properties as and when required is OK.
    – Patanjali
    Feb 16 '20 at 17:54
  • 1
    This approach will make things hard to maintain. Consider: if you use the init method to set some property… 1) you're going to have to keep checking if it did init in every single method (WET); 2) if you want to access a property, you'll have to keep track of whether you already called a method that initialized the property. Seems to me that using an instance of the class and the benefits of a constructor is much better (in other words, that the OP is best answered in the negative, "don't do it.") Mar 2 '20 at 12:38
  • 1
    This approach makes MyClass slightly wetter, but it makes every caller of MyClass drier, because they don’t need to say MyClass::getInstance->someMethod1();. When maintaining MyClass, the code is right there in front of you so if you have to be wet somewhere, it should be here. Jul 22 at 7:21
6

There is a way to call the init() method once and forbid it's usage, you can turn the function into private initializer and ivoke it after class declaration like this:

class Example {
    private static function init() {
        // do whatever needed for class initialization
    }
}
(static function () {
    static::init();
})->bindTo(null, Example::class)();
8
  • 4
    this looks strangely interesting
    – emfi
    Jan 29 '19 at 15:30
  • How is it able to call private init from outside the class? Can you explain the details of what you are doing here? Apr 12 '19 at 16:45
  • 1
    @ToolmakerSteve As the docs says "Static closures cannot have any bound object (the value of the parameter newthis should be NULL), but this function can nevertheless be used to change their class scope." that's why the closure scope is bound to the Example::class so it's possible to call a private method. I have an bug cause the init() method should be static - fixed the example.
    – brzuchal
    Apr 15 '19 at 6:46
  • Edited the example and added static modifier for closure cause it won't be bound to any instance.
    – brzuchal
    Apr 15 '19 at 6:53
  • 1
    Well, in fact, we don't even need init() method, i.e. we can put all initialization code directly into this anonymous function which can act as a static constructor itself.
    – Karolis
    Jan 3 '20 at 0:20
3

I am posting this as an answer because this is very important as of PHP 7.4.

The opcache.preload mechanism of PHP 7.4 makes it possible to preload opcodes for classes. If you use it to preload a file that contains a class definition and some side effects, then classes defined in that file will "exist" for all subsequent scripts executed by this FPM server and its workers, but the side effects will not be in effect, and the autoloader will not require the file containing them because the class already "exists". This completely defeats any and all static initialization techniques that rely on executing top-level code in the file that contains the class definition.

0

If you don't like public static initializer, reflection can be a workaround.

<?php

class LanguageUtility
{
    public static function initializeClass($class)
    {
        try
        {
            // Get a static method named 'initialize'. If not found,
            // ReflectionMethod() will throw a ReflectionException.
            $ref = new \ReflectionMethod($class, 'initialize');

            // The 'initialize' method is probably 'private'.
            // Make it accessible before calling 'invoke'.
            // Note that 'setAccessible' is not available
            // before PHP version 5.3.2.
            $ref->setAccessible(true);

            // Execute the 'initialize' method.
            $ref->invoke(null);
        }   
        catch (Exception $e)
        {
        }
    }
}

class MyClass
{
    private static function initialize()
    {
    }
}

LanguageUtility::initializeClass('MyClass');

?>
1
  • This is incompatible with PHP 7.4 opcache.preload; see my answer. May 3 '20 at 16:12
-2

Note - the RFC proposing this is still in the draft state.


class Singleton
{
    private static function __static()
    {
        //...
    }
    //...
}

proposed for PHP 7.x (see https://wiki.php.net/rfc/static_class_constructor )

1
  • 6
    That RFC isn't out of Draft stage. Please don't link or give examples to things that haven't been approved by a vote. It will confuse new users who don't realize this isn't usable yet
    – Machavity
    Jun 14 '16 at 19:17

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