65

How can I define a class with await in the constructor or class body?

For example what I want:

import asyncio

# some code


class Foo(object):

    async def __init__(self, settings):
        self.settings = settings
        self.pool = await create_pool(dsn)

foo = Foo(settings)
# it raises:
# TypeError: __init__() should return None, not 'coroutine'

or example with class body attribute:

class Foo(object):

    self.pool = await create_pool(dsn)  # Sure it raises syntax Error

    def __init__(self, settings):
        self.settings = settings

foo = Foo(settings)

My solution (But I would like to see a more elegant way)

class Foo(object):

    def __init__(self, settings):
        self.settings = settings

    async def init(self):
        self.pool = await create_pool(dsn)

foo = Foo(settings)
await foo.init()
  • 1
    You might have some luck with __new__, although it might not be elegant – JBernardo Oct 14 '15 at 14:55
  • I don't have experience with 3.5, and in other languages this wouldn't work because of the viral nature of async/await, but have you tried defining an async function like _pool_init(dsn) and then calling it from __init__? It would preserve the init-in-constructor appearance. – a p Oct 14 '15 at 19:34
  • 1
    If you use curio: curio.readthedocs.io/en/latest/… – matsjoyce Jun 26 '17 at 16:04
86

Most magic methods aren't designed to work with async def/await - in general, you should only be using await inside the dedicated asynchronous magic methods - __aiter__, __anext__, __aenter__, and __aexit__. Using it inside other magic methods either won't work at all (as is the case with __init__), or will force you to always use whatever triggers the magic method call in an asynchronous context.

Existing asyncio libraries tend to deal with this in one of two ways: First, I've seen the factory pattern used (asyncio-redis, for example):

import asyncio

dsn = "..."

class Foo(object):
    @classmethod
    async def create(cls, settings):
        self = Foo()
        self.settings = settings
        self.pool = await create_pool(dsn)
        return self

async def main(settings):
    settings = "..."
    foo = await Foo.create(settings)

Other libraries use a top-level coroutine function that creates the object, rather than a factory method:

import asyncio

dsn = "..."

async def create_foo(settings):
    foo = Foo(settings)
    await foo._init()
    return foo

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, settings):
        self.settings = settings

    async def _init(self):
        self.pool = await create_pool(dsn)

async def main():
    settings = "..."
    foo = await create_foo(settings)

The create_pool function from aiopg that you want to call in __init__ is actually using this exact pattern.

This at least addresses the __init__ issue. I haven't seen class variables that make asynchronous calls in the wild that I can recall, so I don't know that any well-established patterns have emerged.

23

Another way to do this, for funsies:

class aobject(object):
    """Inheriting this class allows you to define an async __init__.

    So you can create objects by doing something like `await MyClass(params)`
    """
    async def __new__(cls, *a, **kw):
        instance = super().__new__(cls)
        await instance.__init__(*a, **kw)
        return instance

    async def __init__(self):
        pass

#With non async super classes

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        self.b = 2
        super().__init__()

class C(B, aobject):
    async def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
        self.c=3

#With async super classes

class D(aobject):
    async def __init__(self, a):
        self.a = a

class E(D):
    async def __init__(self):
        self.b = 2
        await super().__init__(1)

# Overriding __new__

class F(aobject):
    async def __new__(cls):
        print(cls)
        return await super().__new__(cls)

    async def __init__(self):
        await asyncio.sleep(1)
        self.f = 6

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
e = loop.run_until_complete(E())
e.b # 2
e.a # 1

c = loop.run_until_complete(C())
c.a # 1
c.b # 2
c.c # 3

f = loop.run_until_complete(F()) # Prints F class
f.f # 6
  • 2
    This is currently the most clear and understandable implementation in my opinion. I really like how intuitively extensible it is. I was worried it would be necessary to delve into metaclasses. – Tankobot Feb 22 '18 at 19:05
  • 1
    This doesn't have correct __init__ semantics if super().__new__(cls) returns a pre-existing instance - normally, this would skip __init__, but your code not. – Eric Dec 16 '18 at 6:51
  • Hmm, per object.__new__ documentation, __init__ should only be invoked if isinstance(instance, cls) ? This seems somewhat unclear to me... But I don't see the semantics you claim anywhere... – khazhyk Dec 17 '18 at 22:50
  • Thinking about this more, if you override __new__ to return a pre-existing object, that new would need to be the outermost to make any sense, since other implementations of __new__ would have no general way of knowing if you're returning a new uninitialized instance or not. – khazhyk Jul 16 '19 at 0:20
18

I would recommend a separate factory method. It's safe and straightforward. However, if you insist on a async version of __init__(), here's an example:

def asyncinit(cls):
    __new__ = cls.__new__

    async def init(obj, *arg, **kwarg):
        await obj.__init__(*arg, **kwarg)
        return obj

    def new(cls, *arg, **kwarg):
        obj = __new__(cls, *arg, **kwarg)
        coro = init(obj, *arg, **kwarg)
        #coro.__init__ = lambda *_1, **_2: None
        return coro

    cls.__new__ = new
    return cls

Usage:

@asyncinit
class Foo(object):
    def __new__(cls):
        '''Do nothing. Just for test purpose.'''
        print(cls)
        return super().__new__(cls)

    async def __init__(self):
        self.initialized = True

async def f():
    print((await Foo()).initialized)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(f())

Output:

<class '__main__.Foo'>
True

Explanation:

Your class construction must return a coroutine object instead of its own instance.

  • Couldn't you name your new __new__ and use super (likewise for __init__, i.e. just let the client override that) instead? – Matthias Urlichs Oct 9 '18 at 2:11
1

Better yet you can do something like this, which is very easy:

import asyncio

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, settings):
    self.settings = settings

    async def async_init(self):
    await create_pool(dsn)

    def __await__(self):
    return self.async_init().__await__()

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
foo = loop.run_until_complete(Foo(settings))

Basically what happens here is __init__() gets called first as usual then __await__() gets called which then awaits async_init().

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