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I am joining two tables x and y (defined below), and creating a new value in the result set depending on whether or not at least one match is found.

create table x (foo int primary key, a int, b int)
insert x VALUES (1,2,3), (2,3,4), (3,NULL,5)

create table y (bar int primary key, a int, b int)
insert y values (8, 3, NULL), (11, 2, NULL), (12, NULL, 3)

Table x is my main data table, which I want to propagate further. Table x can have an a value, a b value, or both an a value and a b value. Table y is a list of a and b values to flag during processing. Table y has either an a or a b value. Even if a record in table x matches more than one record in table y, I still want to flag it only once.

The query below works for what I need. Is there a better way to write it, specifically without using the DISTINCT keyword?

select DISTINCT x.*, case when y.bar is null then 0 else 1 end [Did I Get At Least One Match?]
from x left outer join y
    on ((x.a = y.a) or (x.b = y.b))

Results:
foo  a    b    Did I Get At Least One Match?
1    2    3    1
2    3    4    1
3    NULL 5    0
  • 1
    Use outer apply (select top 1 ...)? – James Z Oct 14 '15 at 15:45
  • Thanks @JamesZ. I ended up with: SELECT x.*, y.[Did I Get At Lease One Match?] FROM x (NOLOCK) OUTER APPLY ( ` SELECT TOP 1 1 [Did I Get At Lease One Match?]` ` FROM y` ` WHERE x.a = y.a or x.b = y.b` ) y which was the best in terms of cost, after filling out the tables to sizes that were reflective of what they'll be in practice. – mathewb Oct 14 '15 at 16:45
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You can also use GROUP BY:

SELECT      x.foo, x.a, x.b,
            match_count = COUNT(y.bar)
FROM        x
LEFT JOIN   y ON x.a = y.a OR x.b = y.b
GROUP BY    x.foo, x.a, x.b
  • but then you need to group using y.bar as well as you can only use values not in the group by clause in the aggregate functions, if we need to use it in a CASE then we need to group by that as well – M22an Oct 14 '15 at 16:17
  • Thanks @Zoff-Dino. I wrapped the COUNT in a case statement and got the values I wanted. It was much better than the DISTINCT, but not as good as an OUTER APPLY. – mathewb Oct 14 '15 at 16:58
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If you must not use a DISTINCT then how about a sub query ?

select *, (select top 1 case when y.bar is null then 0 else 1 end [Did I Get At Least One Match?] from x left outer join y on ((x.a = y.a) or (x.b = y.b))) [Did I Get At Least One Match?] from x

Here is the fiddle link, http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/cb6a2/9

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