4

Why need to set public before override viewDidload in a public access control viewController

public class customViewController: UIViewController {
    override public func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
    }
}

if I remove the public, Xcode will give an error warning!

9

The error message is fairly explicit:

Overriding instance method must be as accessible as the declaration it overrides.

This means that a method must not have a lower access level than the method it overrides.

For example given this class:

public class Superclass {
    internal func doSomething() {
        ...
    }
}

You cannot then override doSomething with a method that is less accessible than interal. e.g.

public class Subclass : Superclass {
    // error
    private override func doSomething() {
    }
}

You can however override a method and make it more accessible:

public class Subclass : Superclass {
    public override func doSomething() {
        // You can even call the internal method in the superclass
        super.doSomething()
    }
}

The reference documentation has lots of detail on this, but seems to leave this relationship to implication.

  • 1
    I think the override access control level can not be lower than the minimum level between the class's level and the method's level. – Dennis Oct 15 '15 at 9:35
1

Took from here

Public access enables entities to be used within any source file from their defining module, and also in a source file from another module that imports the defining module. You typically use public access when specifying the public interface to a framework.

Internal access enables entities to be used within any source file from their defining module, but not in any source file outside of that module. You typically use internal access when defining an app’s or a framework’s internal structure.

Private access restricts the use of an entity to the enclosing declaration. Use private access to hide the implementation details of a specific piece of functionality.

File-private access restricts the use of an entity to its own defining source file.

Do you need public modifier? You can write it like this:

class customViewController: UIViewController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
    }
}

No warnings

  • The example code given actually creates an internal customViewController class since that is the default access level when none is specified. – Steve Wilford Oct 15 '15 at 8:59
  • Thank you! I understand the difference between the access control levels. I really puzzled why I add public give me an error. I think the override access control level can not be lower than the minimum level between the class's level and the method's level. – Dennis Oct 15 '15 at 9:38
  • In Swift 3 private access restricts the use of an entity to the enclosing declaration, while fileprivate restricts the use to the source file. – nbloqs Feb 2 '17 at 21:44
0

You class declaration is:

public class customViewController: UIViewController

This opens the customViewController up to public access (publicly inherited)

Writing this gives you error:

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
}

What happened here was an unpleasant interaction between the default access level for a method and how inheritance handles access levels.

A subclass must preserve the accessibility of its superclass’s methods wherever the subclass might be used directly. Otherwise, we would violate the substitution principle that allows us to treat all kinds of UIViewController as just another UIViewController.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.