85

I want to be able to run a command from my machine using ssh and pass through the environment variable $BUILD_NUMBER

Here's what I'm trying:

ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 '~/tools/myScript.pl $BUILD_NUMBER'

$BUILD_NUMBER is set on the machine making the ssh call and since the variable doesn't exist on the remote host, it doesn't get picked up.

How do I pass the value of $BUILD_NUMBER ?

  • 1
    unrelated to Hudson, removed the tag. (Hudson just creates the variable) – Peter Schuetze Jul 23 '10 at 14:02
161

If you use

ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 "~/tools/run_pvt.pl $BUILD_NUMBER"

instead of

ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 '~/tools/run_pvt.pl $BUILD_NUMBER'

your shell will interpolate the $BUILD_NUMBER before sending the command string to the remote host.

  • 6
    If someone MUST use single quotes so that the command included in the quotes is not locally evaluated, then they should use "'$VARIABLE'". Example: ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 '~/tools/run_pvt.pl "'$BUILD_NUMBER'"' – dr.doom Oct 10 '16 at 2:36
  • 2
    didn't know that bash reacts differently with single quotes and double quotes. Thanks! – silgon Aug 29 '17 at 7:49
  • linux core developers must burn in hell – goldstar Jan 28 at 10:56
  • @goldstar, note that the difference between single quote and double quote behaviour in the shell predates Linux by decades. – sarnold Jan 30 at 3:56
  • 3
    PSA: if your string contains user input, this is a very bad idea, and could open you up to code injection attacks. – Brian McCutchon Feb 14 at 20:23
26

Variables in single-quotes are not evaluated. Use double quotes:

ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 "~/tools/run_pvt.pl $BUILD_NUMBER"

The shell will expand variables in double-quotes, but not in single-quotes. This will change into your desired string before being passed to the ssh command.

2

(This answer might seem needlessly complicated, but it’s easily extensible and robust regarding whitespace and special characters, as far as I know.)

You can feed data right through the standard input of the ssh command and read that from the remote location.

In the following example,

  1. an indexed array is filled (for convenience) with the names of the variables whose values you want to retrieve on the remote side.
  2. For each of those variables, we give to ssh a null-terminated line giving the name and value of the variable.
  3. In the shh command itself, we loop through these lines to initialise the required variables.
# Initialize examples of variables.
# The first one even contains whitespace and a newline.
readonly FOO=$'apjlljs ailsi \n ajlls\t éjij'
readonly BAR=ygnàgyààynygbjrbjrb

# Make a list of what you want to pass through SSH.
# (The “unset” is just in case someone exported
# an associative array with this name.)
unset -v VAR_NAMES
readonly VAR_NAMES=(
    FOO
    BAR
)

for name in "${VAR_NAMES[@]}"
do
    printf '%s %s\0' "$name" "${!name}"
done | ssh user@somehost.com '
    while read -rd '"''"' name value
    do
        export "$name"="$value"
    done

    # Check
    printf "FOO = [%q]; BAR = [%q]\n" "$FOO" "$BAR"
'

Output:

FOO = [$'apjlljs ailsi \n ajlls\t éjij']; BAR = [ygnàgyààynygbjrbjrb]

If you don’t need to export those, you should be able to use declare instead of export.

A really simplified version (if you don’t need the extensibility, have a single variable to process, etc.) would look like:

$ ssh user@somehost.com 'read foo' <<< "$foo"
0

As answered previously, you do not need to set the environment variable on the remote host. Instead, you can simply do the meta-expansion on the local host, and pass the value to the remote host.

ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 '~/tools/run_pvt.pl $BUILD_NUMBER'

If you really want to set the environment variable on the remote host and use it, you can use the env program

ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 "env BUILD_NUMBER=$BUILD_NUMBER ~/tools/run_pvt.pl \$BUILD_NUMBER"

In this case this is a bit of an overkill, and note

  • env BUILD_NUMBER=$BUILD_NUMBER does the meta expansion on the local host
  • the remote BUILD_NUMBER environment variable will be used by
    the remote shell
-2

Escape the variable in order to access variables outside of the ssh session: ssh pvt@192.168.1.133 "~/tools/myScript.pl \$BUILD_NUMBER"

  • 1
    This does not achieve what the question is asking for. – Patrick Trentin Aug 29 '17 at 7:39
  • 2
    from a shell point of view, '$FOO' is equivalent to "\$FOO". the question was "how to pass a shell variable with SSH?". As already stated by @PatrickTrentin this is not a correct answer because then BUILD_NUMBER environment variable is not set remotely. – Gilles Gouaillardet Aug 29 '17 at 11:16

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