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I have a strange issue with some SSE2 and AVX code I have been working on. I am building my application using GCC which runtime cpu feature detection. The object files are built with seperate flags for each CPU feature, for example:

g++ -c -o ConvertSamples_SSE.o ConvertSamples_SSE.cpp -std=c++11 -fPIC -O0 -g -Wall -I./include -msse
g++ -c -o ConvertSamples_SSE2.o ConvertSamples_SSE2.cpp -std=c++11 -fPIC -O0 -g -Wall -I./include -msse2
g++ -c -o ConvertSamples_AVX.o ConvertSamples_AVX.cpp -std=c++11 -fPIC -O0 -g -Wall -I./include -mavx

When I first launch the program, I find that the SSE2 routines are as per normal with a nice speed boost over the non SSE routines (around 100% faster). After I run any AVX routine, the exact same SSE2 routine now runs much slower.

Could someone please explain what the cause of this may be?

Before the AVX routine runs, all the tests are around 80-130% faster then FPU math, as can be seen here, after the AVX routine runs, the SSE routines are much slower.

If I skip the AVX test routines I never see this performance loss.

Here is my SSE2 routine

void Float_S16(const float *in, int16_t *out, const unsigned int samples)
{
  static float  ratio = (float)Limits<int16_t>::range() / (float)Limits<float>::range();
  static __m128 mul   = _mm_set_ps1(ratio);

  unsigned int i;
  for (i = 0; i < samples - 3; i += 4, in += 4, out += 4)
  {
    __m128i con = _mm_cvtps_epi32(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps(in), mul));
    out[0] = ((int16_t*)&con)[0];
    out[1] = ((int16_t*)&con)[2];
    out[2] = ((int16_t*)&con)[4];
    out[3] = ((int16_t*)&con)[6];
  }

  for (; i < samples; ++i, ++in, ++out)
    *out = (int16_t)lrint(*in * ratio);
}

And the AVX version of the same.

void Float_S16(const float *in, int16_t *out, const unsigned int samples)
{
  static float ratio = (float)Limits<int16_t>::range() / (float)Limits<float>::range();
  static __m256 mul  = _mm256_set1_ps(ratio);

  unsigned int i;
  for (i = 0; i < samples - 7; i += 8, in += 8, out += 8)
  {
    __m256i con = _mm256_cvtps_epi32(_mm256_mul_ps(_mm256_load_ps(in), mul));
    out[0] = ((int16_t*)&con)[0];
    out[1] = ((int16_t*)&con)[2];
    out[2] = ((int16_t*)&con)[4];
    out[3] = ((int16_t*)&con)[6];
    out[4] = ((int16_t*)&con)[8];
    out[5] = ((int16_t*)&con)[10];
    out[6] = ((int16_t*)&con)[12];
    out[7] = ((int16_t*)&con)[14];
  }

  for(; i < samples; ++i, ++in, ++out)
    *out = (int16_t)lrint(*in * ratio);
}

I have also run this through valgrind which detects no errors.

  • 1
    How is the time measured? – Gilles Oct 15 '15 at 13:26
  • @Gilles using clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &start); before and after, then calculating the difference. – Geoffrey Oct 15 '15 at 13:27
  • 4
  • 1
    Besides the mixing AVX/SSE issue, don't benchmark with -O0, it's silly. Use at least -Og, preferably -O3. – Peter Cordes Oct 15 '15 at 23:44
  • 1
    @Geoffrey: -Og makes debuggable code that can be single-stepped line-by-line. It's apparently the suggested option for edit/compile/debug cycles. Benchmarking with -O0 is sometimes useful, sometimes not. It's possible for source A to be faster than source B with -O3, but slower with -O0. I can't think of any examples with a huge difference, but if you're ever going to look at timing numbers, use -Og. – Peter Cordes Oct 17 '15 at 19:18
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Mixing AVX code and legacy SSE code incurs a performance penalty. The most reasonable solution is to execute the VZEROALL instruction after an AVX segment of code, especially just before executing SSE code.

As per Intel's diagram, the penalty when transitioning into or out of state C (legacy SSE with upper half of AVX registers saved) is in the order of 100 clock cycles. The other transitions are only 1 cycle:

References:

  • 2
    This issue can effects drastic effects which seem totally unrelated to this penalty. See this question where the OP saw a speed up with over 500 threads on a system that only had eight hyper-threads. – Z boson Oct 16 '15 at 8:37

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