294

The logical expression ( a && b ) (both a and b have boolean values) can be written like !(!a || !b), for example. Doesn't this mean that && is "unneccesary"? Does this mean that all logical expressions can be made only using || and !?

  • 83
    This is more of a basic symbolic logic question than a Java issue, but yes. OR and NOT in combination can be used to construct everything else. The same with AND and NOT. For instance, when I was in school we were taught to build everything using only NAND gates because they took fewer transistors. – azurefrog Oct 15 '15 at 17:58
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    Don't confuse the capability to write a statement this way with the desirability to do so. Syntactic sugar is a good thing. – azurefrog Oct 15 '15 at 17:59
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    Many logic gate chips only provide NAND or NOR gates as it's possible to implement all operations with them and it makes them cheap to produce - A and B == !A nor !B == !(!A or !B). Likewise A or B == !A nand !B == !(!A and !B). Obviously passing the same value to both inputs of a NAND or NOR will give the same result as a simple NOT. XOR and XNOR are also possible but more complex. See De Morgan's theorem – Basic Oct 15 '15 at 22:52
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    Isn't this a computer science question? I see no code here. In particular, whether this is true in practice will vary by implementation, e.g. in C++ with operating overloading it's not in general. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 16 '15 at 13:11
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    @SnakeDoc I don't think anyone here is advocating to do such a thing. I believe this question was more of theoretical logic question, than a programming one, really. – ryuu9187 Oct 16 '15 at 19:00
424

Yes, as the other answers pointed out, the set of operators comprising of || and ! is functionally complete. Here's a constructive proof of that, showing how to use them to express all sixteen possible logical connectives between the boolean variables A and B:

Note that both NAND and NOR are by themselves functionally complete (which can be proved using the same method above), so if you want to verify that a set of operators is functionally complete, it's enough to show that you can express either NAND or NOR with it.

Here's a graph showing the Venn diagrams for each of the connectives listed above:

enter image description here

[source]

  • 20
    It's hard to tell whether the question intends this, but this answer doesn't address short-circuit behaviour (relevant, since the question asks about || rather than |) or side-effects (relevant because the expansion of true, false, XOR and XNOR evaluate their arguments more times than the original constant or operator did). – David Richerby Oct 18 '15 at 10:13
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    The circles containing circles and the transitions form a Hasse Diagram (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasse_diagram). (Yay, I learned something new today!) – Kasper van den Berg Oct 18 '15 at 18:59
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    @DavidRicherby That's true. Other than the XOR, XNOR, true, and false, as far as I can tell, the side effects and number of evaluations should be the same as built-in equivalents (e.g. !(!A || !B) has the same short-circuiting and evaluation count as A && B). I don't think you can do this for XOR and XNOR without additional constructs (e.g. a ? !b : b), and true or false isn't a problem if you can save values, since you could start your program by defining true and false using some dummy boolean variable. – Peter Olson Oct 19 '15 at 1:22
  • It's interesting to note that the list above comprises 16 operations. This is consistent with the fact that there are 16 possible truth tables for the case where you have 2 inputs and 1 output. – Paul R Oct 20 '15 at 17:15
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    Just wanted to add another visualization as a table for people's reference. Same source as above. – aug Oct 20 '15 at 18:34
125

What you are describing is functional completeness.

This describes a set of logical operators that is sufficient to "express all possible truth tables". Your Java operator set, {||, !}, is sufficient; it corresponds to the set {∨, ¬}, which is listed under the section "Minimal functionally complete operator sets".

The set of all truth tables means all possible sets of 4 boolean values that can be the result of an operation between 2 boolean values. Because there are 2 possible values for a boolean, there are 24, or 16, possible truth tables.

A B | 0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15
----+------------------------------------------------
T T | T  T  T  T  T  T  T  T  F  F  F  F  F  F  F  F
T F | T  T  T  T  F  F  F  F  T  T  T  T  F  F  F  F
F T | T  T  F  F  T  T  F  F  T  T  F  F  T  T  F  F 
F F | T  F  T  F  T  F  T  F  T  F  T  F  T  F  T  F

Here is a table of the truth table numbers (0-15), the || and ! combinations that yield it, and a description.

Table  |  Operation(s)                    | Description
-------+----------------------------------+-------------
  0    | A || !A                          | TRUE
  1    | A || B                           | OR
  2    | A || !B                          | B IMPLIES A
  3    | A                                | A
  4    | !A || B                          | A IMPLIES B
  5    | B                                | B
  6    | !(!A || !B) || !(A || B)         | XNOR (equals)
  7    | !(!A || !B)                      | AND
  8    | !A || !B                         | NAND
  9    | !(A || !B) || !(!A || B)         | XOR
 10    | !B                               | NOT B
 11    | !(!A || B)                       | NOT A IMPLIES B
 12    | !A                               | NOT A
 13    | !(A || !B)                       | NOT B IMPLIES A
 14    | !(A || B)                        | NOR
 15    | !(A || !A)                       | FALSE

There are plenty of other such functionally complete sets, including the one element sets {NAND} and {NOR}, which don't have corresponding single operators in Java.

  • 4
    +1 for the edit. Despite the difference in vote counts, I think your answer is actually more detailed than mine now. – Peter Olson Oct 21 '15 at 0:56
  • Truth Tables i thought i had left them behind after first year in university – Martin Barker Nov 25 '15 at 12:57
80

Yes.

All logic gates can be made from NOR gates.

Since a NOR gate can be made from a NOT and an OR, the result follows.

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    @PaulDraper or NAND gates – slebetman Oct 16 '15 at 9:17
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    It took 4100 NOR gates to land two people on the moon. – Hans Passant Oct 16 '15 at 14:54
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    @HansPassant And some string. Lots of string. (Core rope memory, not the tin can variety.) – a CVn Oct 16 '15 at 21:24
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    @HansPassant Sometimes I wish Stack Exchange was Wikipedia, then I would insert a [citation-needed] mark right there. – Simon Forsberg Oct 17 '15 at 22:32
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    Yes, sorry, Apollo guidance computer. – Hans Passant Oct 18 '15 at 7:27
64

Take the time to read up on DeMorgan's Laws if you can.

You will find the answer in the reading there, as well as references to the logical proofs.

But essentially, the answer is yes.

EDIT: For explicitness, my point is that one can logically infer an OR expression from an AND expression, and vice-versa. There are more laws as well for logical equivalence and inference, but I think this one most apropos.


EDIT 2: Here's a proof via truth-table showing the logical equivalence of the following expression.

DeMorgan's Law: !(!A || !B) -> A && B

 _____________________________________________________
| A | B | !A  | !B  | !A || !B | !(!A || !B) | A && B | 
-------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | 0 |  1  |  1  |    1     |      0      |   0    | 
-------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | 1 |  1  |  0  |    1     |      0      |   0    |
-------------------------------------------------------
| 1 | 0 |  0  |  1  |    1     |      0      |   0    |
-------------------------------------------------------
| 1 | 1 |  0  |  0  |    0     |      1      |   1    |
_______________________________________________________
  • 1
    Care to comment on the down vote...? – ryuu9187 Oct 16 '15 at 12:44
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    Some people have to down vote as part of their "functional completeness" – Jesse Oct 16 '15 at 13:16
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    At +27/-2, I wouldn't worry much about a stray downvote. – a CVn Oct 16 '15 at 21:25
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    @MichaelKjörling I'm just curious why some people thought my answer was not helpful / was harmful. – ryuu9187 Oct 16 '15 at 21:47
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    Generally answers that rely on links aren't liked too much (as links die), but in this case any there are so many alternative explanations of DeMorgan's Laws, that I don't see an issue - still, that's my guess as to the DV's – user2813274 Oct 17 '15 at 4:10
11

NAND and NOR are universal they can be used to build up any logical operation you want anywhere; other operator are available in programming languages to make it easy to write and make readable codes.

Also all the logical operations which are needed to be hardwired in circuit are also developed using either NAND or NOR only ICs.

10

Yes, according to Boolean algebra, any Boolean function can be expressed as a sum of minterms or a product of maxterms, which is called canonical normal form. There is no reason why such logic couldn't be applied to the same operators used in computer science.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canonical_normal_form

protected by Samuel Liew Oct 17 '15 at 14:22

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