2

I have a string class implemented as a class template like:

template <class T>
class HGStringBasic
{
//...
public:
//...
    HGStringBasic& operator += (const T* rhs)
    {
        //...
    }

    template <class U, std::enable_if_t<std::is_same<U, char>::value>* = nullptr>
    HGStringBasic& operator += (const U* rhs)
    {
        //...
    }
//...   
}

The code is C++ 11 standard conform. The goal was to implement an overloaded operator += (const char) which is only used, if class T of the template is for instance "wchar_t".

I would like to know, how i can achieve the same result if the compiler don't understand C++11.

UPDATE: Sry i'm new to stackoverlow and i haven't seen, that my code wasn't fully shown in the code block. I have now updated my code sniped so far. I have also corrected a mistake within the template argument list from the template function operator += (), TartanLlama you're absolutly right, is_same<T, char> must be is_same<U, char>.

  • 1
    Does that std::enable_if even work? I would have thought failures would be hard as T isn't in the immediate context of the function declaration. – TartanLlama Oct 16 '15 at 14:47
  • you're absolutly right, is_same<T, char> must be is_same<U, char> in this case – Christian Oct 16 '15 at 19:43
1

First of all, enable_if/is_same can be easily be implemented in C++2003. Boost has them, for example, or you can create those yourserlf - it's a good practice.

Second, if you do not want to use enable_if, you can simply provide a specialization of myString for w_char. To reduce amount of coding, put this in some base class, derive myString from the base class and provide specialization of base class.

1

enable_if doesn't depend on C++11 functionality. It was implemented way before C++11 in boost library almost the same way it is implemented now. Here's a possible implementation taken from cppreference.com:

template<bool B, class T = void>
struct enable_if {};

template<class T>
struct enable_if<true, T> { typedef T type; };

This would work perfectly fine in C++ prior to C++11.

1

Now i have figured it out, no c++11 and with the already known metafunctions. Big thanks to Barry for the hint with specifying the return type.

Here is what i did:

#include <type_traits>

template <class _ElemT>
class HGStringBasic
{
    public:
        // Append char* or wchar_t* depending on specialization
        HGStringBasic& operator += (const _ElemT* rhs)
        {
            return *this;
        }

        // Allow char* if specialization is wchar_t
        template <class U>
        typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<U, char>::value, HGStringBasic&>::type operator += (const U* rhs)
        {
            // Convert ansistring to widestring
            return *this;
        }

        // Allow wchar_t* if specialization is char
        template <class U>
        typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<U, wchar_t>::value, HGStringBasic&>::type operator += (const U* rhs)
        {
            // Convert widestring to ansistring
            return *this;
        }
};
0

First of all, your C++11 does not work. If I tried to do:

myString<int> x;
x += new int(4);

Your operator+= would fail to compile. SFINAE only applies in the immediate context of substitution - but T isn't in the immediate context here, only U is. So the correct thing would be:

template <class U, 
          class _T=T,
          class = std::enable_if_t<std::is_same<_T, char>::value>>
myString& operator += (const U* rhs);

Now back to the original question. How do we write the above in C++03? Same idea. We just can't have default template arguments. But the same principle applies: we need a substitution failure in the immediate context:

template <typename T, typename U, typename R>
struct allow_for_char;

template <typename U, typename R>
struct allow_for_char<char, U, R> { typedef R type; };

Which you could then use to specify the return type:

template <class U>
typename allow_for_char<T, U, myString&>::type
operator += (const U* rhs);
  • you're right, it won't work. i have updated my code now ... – Christian Oct 16 '15 at 19:50
  • @Christian Wait what, that's a completely different question then. Now you don't even need enable_if at all... – Barry Oct 16 '15 at 20:18
  • I need enable_if_t<> if specialization is for example HGStringBasic<wchar_t>, then i have a operator += (const wchar_t*) and the second operator, is operator += (const char*). But if specialization is HGStringBasic<char>, the second operator will not be used, due the first implementation of operator += (const char*).So I'm able to append const char* to my string if specialization is HGStringBasic<wchar_t>. – Christian Oct 19 '15 at 6:21

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