4

I want to be able to check, add and remove T:TElements from ST:TElementSet.

type
  TElements = (elA, elB, elC);
  TElementSet = set of TElements;

  TMyClass<T, ST> = class
    property SetValue:ST;
  end;

Generics doesn't enable me to tell the compiler that T is an enumerated type and that ST is a set of T.

RTTI enables me to identify the types as tkEnumeration and tkSet - but I am unsure if I can make a strict connection between the two using RTTI. That doesn't really matter as I only need to twiddle the set bits by ordinal value.

The question is: Can I do this safely, using Generics and RTTI, and if so - how?

Examples and/or references to prior art would be appreciated.

  • Have you tried using the standard Include() and Exclude() functions, and the in operator? As long as T and ST are compatible types, I would expect it would work, and fail to compile for incompatible types. – Remy Lebeau Oct 16 '15 at 15:25
  • @Remy That won't work with generic types because there's no way to apply a suitable constraint – David Heffernan Oct 16 '15 at 15:35
  • @Lars Your property declaration is invalid. You did this earlier over on Google+. Could you fix it perchance? – David Heffernan Oct 16 '15 at 15:39
  • I don't think this is going to be very much fun. Right of the bat it's galling to have to parameterise on both T and ST because you cannot constrain T to be something where set of T is meaningful. Then the RTTI mechanism gives you no means to get the compiler to include, exclude, query membership etc. I think you'll need to write your own bit twiddling code that is based on knowledge of the size of the enumeration, and hence the size and layout of the set type. Humph! Do I want to write some code to do this? Sadly, at this time on a Friday I do not! – David Heffernan Oct 16 '15 at 15:48
5

Assuming that we only handle enums that are contiguous (because others don't have proper typeinfo and could not be handled so easily) we can do this simply without typeInfo/RTTI.

An enum set it just a bit mask for the elements in an enum.

So for example the set [elA, elC] equals 00000101 (right-to-left) which equals 5.

The index of the bit to set equals the ordinal value of the enum + 1 (because the first enum value has ordinal 0 but it's the 1st bit).

Since we cannot set individual bits in Delphi but only Bytes we need to calculate the correct value which leads to this code for include:

set[enum div 8] := set[enum div 8] or (1 shl (enum mod 8))

Since sets cannot contain more than 256 elements we are also save to assume that the enum value is always the size of a Byte. Handling enums that don't start at 0 would require a bit more code and reading typeinfo for their min and max value

Here some test code - I tricksed a bit with using absolute but you can also use hardcasts:

program GenericEnumSet;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  TMyEnum = (elA, elB, elC);
  TMySet = set of TMyEnum;

  TEnumSet<TEnum,TSet> = record
    value: TSet;
    procedure Include(const value: TEnum); inline;
    procedure Exclude(const value: TEnum); inline;
  end;

procedure _Include(var setValue; const enumValue);
var
  localEnum: Byte absolute enumValue;
  localSet: array[0..31] of Byte absolute setValue;
begin
  localSet[localEnum div 8] := localSet[localEnum div 8] or (1 shl (localEnum mod 8));
end;

procedure _Exclude(var setValue; const enumValue);
var
  localEnum: Byte absolute enumValue;
  localSet: array[0..31] of Byte absolute setValue;
begin
  localSet[localEnum div 8] := localSet[localEnum div 8] and not (1 shl (localEnum mod 8));
end;

procedure TEnumSet<TEnum, TSet>.Include(const value: TEnum);
begin
  _Include(Self.value, value);
end;

procedure TEnumSet<TEnum, TSet>.Exclude(const value: TEnum);
begin
  _Exclude(Self.value, value);
end;

var
  mySet: TEnumSet<TMyEnum,TMySet>;
  myEnum: TMyEnum;
begin
  mySet.value := [];
  for myEnum := Low(TMyEnum) to High(TMyEnum) do
  begin
    mySet.Include(myEnum);
    Assert(mySet.value = [Low(TMyEnum)..myEnum]);
  end;
  for myEnum := Low(TMyEnum) to High(TMyEnum) do
  begin
    mySet.Exclude(myEnum);
    if myEnum < High(TMyEnum) then
      Assert(mySet.value = [Succ(myEnum)..High(TMyEnum)])
    else
      Assert(mySet.value = []);
  end;
  Readln;
end.

I leave implementing other methods and error checking as an exercise for the reader.

  • Presumably the answer to the question asked, "Can I do this safely, using Generics and RTTI, and if so - how?" really is "no". – David Heffernan Oct 16 '15 at 19:05
  • 1
    Put some check code in there that checks for typeinfo <> nil, that the generic parameters have the correct typekind, the min and max value of the enum and then you have it safe. – Stefan Glienke Oct 17 '15 at 12:20
  • I think Lars was wanting to use an RTTI mechanism to operate on the sets. I don't think that's possible, and one needs to resort to the sort of approaches that you show. Is my understanding correct? – David Heffernan Oct 17 '15 at 12:50
  • I'll use RTTI to verify that TS is a set and that T is an element type. Unfortunately, I need both types as params to allow for parameter/assignment compatibility for the ordinal to string lookup method. If we had the enumeration type constraint, this would have been a lot simpler. – Lars Fosdal Oct 19 '15 at 7:06
  • You can use the record constraint (which actually means any value type) which restricts it very much (but not completely of course). – Stefan Glienke Oct 19 '15 at 10:06
1

This ain't fast, and you won't get any compiler-time safety thanks to Delphi having generics and not templates, but I think this should cover all the bases at runtime.

program GenericSetInclusion;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SysUtils,
  System.TypInfo,
  System.Rtti;

type
  TElm = (elFoo, elBar, elXyz);
  TElms = set of TElm;

  TOrd = 7..150;
  TOrds = set of TOrd;

type
  SafeSet = record
    class procedure Include<ST, T>(var s: ST; const e: T); static;
  end;

{ SafeSet }

class procedure SafeSet.Include<ST, T>(var s: ST; const e: T);
var
  ctx: TRttiContext;
  typ1: TRttiType;
  typ2: TRttiType;
  styp: TRttiSetType;
  etyp: TRttiOrdinalType;
  ttyp: TRttiOrdinalType;
  tmp: set of 0..255;
  o: 0..255;
  i: integer;
begin
  ctx := TRttiContext.Create();
  typ1 := ctx.GetType(TypeInfo(ST));

  if (typ1 = nil) then
    raise EArgumentException.Create('SafeSet<ST, T>.Include: ST has no type info');

  typ2 := ctx.GetType(TypeInfo(T));
  if (typ2 = nil) then
    raise EArgumentException.CreateFmt('SafeSet<ST=%s, T>.Include: T has no type info (most likely due to explicit ordinality)', [typ1.Name]);

  if (not (typ1 is TRttiSetType)) then
    raise EArgumentException.CreateFmt('SafeSet<ST=%s, T=%s>.Include: ST is not a set type', [typ1.Name, typ2.Name]);

  styp := TRttiSetType(typ1);

  if (SizeOf(ST) > SizeOf(tmp)) then
    raise EInvalidOpException.CreateFmt('SafeSet<ST=%s, T=%s>.Include: SizeOf(ST) > 8', [styp.Name, typ2.Name]);

  etyp := styp.ElementType as TRttiOrdinalType;

  if (not (typ2 is TRttiOrdinalType)) then
    raise EArgumentException.CreateFmt('SafeSet<ST=%s, T=%s>.Include: T is not an ordinal type', [styp.Name, typ2.Name]);

  ttyp := TRttiOrdinalType(typ2);

  case ttyp.OrdType of
    otSByte: i := PShortInt(@e)^;
    otUByte: i := PByte(@e)^;
  else
    raise EInvalidOpException.CreateFmt('SafeSet<ST=%s, T=%s>.Include: SizeOf(T) > 1', [styp.Name, ttyp.Name]);
  end;

  if (ttyp.Handle <> styp.ElementType.Handle) then
  begin
    if (((etyp is TRttiEnumerationType) and (not (ttyp is TRttiEnumerationType)))) or
       ((not (etyp is TRttiEnumerationType)) and (ttyp is TRttiEnumerationType)) then
      raise EArgumentException.CreateFmt('SafeSet<ST=%s, T=%s>.Include: ST is not a set of T (ST is set of %s)', [styp.Name, ttyp.Name, etyp.Name]);

    // ST is a set of integers rather than a set of enum
    // so do bounds checking
    if ((i < etyp.MinValue) or (i > etyp.MaxValue)) then
      raise EArgumentException.CreateFmt('SafeSet<ST=%s, T=%s>.Include: %d is not a valid element for ST (ST is set of %s = %d..%d)', [styp.Name, ttyp.Name, i, etyp.Name, etyp.MinValue, etyp.MaxValue]);
  end;

  o := i;

  FillChar(tmp, SizeOf(tmp), 0);
  Move(s, tmp, SizeOf(ST));

  System.Include(tmp, o);

  Move(tmp, s, SizeOf(ST));
end;

procedure Test(const p: TProc);
begin
  try
    p();
    WriteLn('Success');
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end;

var
  s: TElms;
  o: TOrds;
begin
  Test(
    procedure
    begin
      SafeSet.Include(s, elFoo);
      Assert(elFoo in s, 'elFoo not in s');
      Assert((s - [elFoo]) = [], 's contains elements it should not');

      SafeSet.Include(s, elBar);
      Assert(elFoo in s, 'elFoo not in s');
      Assert(elBar in s, 'elBar not in s');
      Assert((s - [elFoo, elBar]) = [], 's contains elements it should not');

      SafeSet.Include(s, elXyz);
      Assert(elFoo in s, 'elFoo not in s');
      Assert(elBar in s, 'elBar not in s');
      Assert(elXyz in s, 'elXyz not in s');
      Assert((s - [elFoo, elBar, elXyz]) = [], 's contains elements it should not');
    end
  );

  Test(
    procedure
    begin
      SafeSet.Include(o, 7);
      Assert(7 in o, '7 not in o');
      Assert((o - [7]) = [], 'o contains elements it should not');
    end
  );

  Test(
    procedure
    begin
      SafeSet.Include(s, 7);
      Assert(False, '7 should not be in s');
    end
  );

  Test(
    procedure
    begin
      SafeSet.Include(o, elFoo);
      Assert(False, 'elFoo should not be in o');
    end
  );

  Test(
    procedure
    begin
      SafeSet.Include(o, 1);
      Assert(False, '1 should not be in o');
    end
  );

  ReadLn;
end.

This outputs the following for me, using D10:

Success
Success
EArgumentException: SafeSet<ST=TElms, T=ShortInt>.Include: ST is not a set of T (ST is set of TElm)
EArgumentException: SafeSet<ST=TOrds, T=TElm>.Include: ST is not a set of T (ST is set of TOrd)
EArgumentException: SafeSet<ST=TOrds, T=ShortInt>.Include: 1 is not a valid element for ST (ST is set of TOrd = 7..150)
  • The enumerations that I need this for are all zero based and contiguous, fortunately - and as such I should never get the range check problem. Verifying that it actually has normal and not explicit ordinality is a good idea though. – Lars Fosdal Oct 19 '15 at 7:10

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