How can I use varargs to print out multiple strings? I tried this but I cannot determine the size of the array. It just prints garbage.

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
{$POINTERMATH ON}

function _Print(const S: String): string; cdecl;
var
  Args: Array[0..100] of Pointer absolute S;
  I: Integer;
begin
  I := 0;
  while Args[I] <> nil do
  begin
    WriteLn(PString(@Args[I])^);
    Inc(I);
  end;
end;

const Print: function(const S: String): string; cdecl varargs = _Print;

var
  A, B: String;
begin
  A := 'ABC';
  B := 'CDE';
  Print(a, b, 'asdasd', 'fasd', ' ')
end.
  • Why do you need to do all this? Delphi supports arrays, and has functions that allow you to obtain the Length, Low index, and High index values into the array. You can simply pass the array to your function and iterate through it without trying to jump through all these hoops. Your function declaration then becomes procedure Print(Values: array of string);. – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 23:07
  • It's not faster. Where did you get that ridiculous idea? I prefer pointers is nonsense. For what you're attempting to do here, there's no speed improvement, and it's an unnecessary level of complexity. (I'm leaving this comment even though you deleted your comment that it responds to immediately after I posted this reply. For the benefit of others, it said Because its faster. I prefer ponters.) – Ken White Oct 16 '15 at 23:08
up vote 3 down vote accepted

A varargs function has no automated way to determine the number of arguments being passed, because only the caller knows how many parameters it is putting on the call stack. The function must determine the arguments manually, either by:

  1. requiring the caller to pass the actual number of parameter as a fixed parameter:

    function _Print(NumStrings: Integer; const Strings: string): string; cdecl;
    var
      Args: Array[0..100] of Pointer absolute Strings;
      I: Integer;
    begin
      for I := 0 to NumStrings-1 do
      begin
        WriteLn(PString(@Strings[I])^);
      end;
    end;
    
    const
      Print: function(NumStrings: Integer; const Strings: string): string; cdecl varargs = _Print;
    
    var
      A, B: String;
    begin
      A := 'ABC';
      B := 'CDE';
      Print(5, a, b, 'asdasd', 'fasd', ' ');
    end.
    
  2. putting a sentry value at the end of the parameter list that the function can then look for. Your function is already coded for this (it is looking for a nil pointer), so just pass one:

    Print(a, b, 'asdasd', 'fasd', ' ', nil);
    

That being said, either approach is subject to caller error and thus potentially dangerous if misused, which is why varargs-style functions are not used very often. You should consider using an open-array parameter instead:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
{$POINTERMATH ON}

function _Print(const Args: array of string): string;
var
  I: Integer;
begin
  for I := Low(Args) to High(Args) do
  begin
    WriteLn(Args[I]);
  end;
end;

const
  Print: function(const Args: array of string): string = _Print;

var
  A, B: String;
begin
  A := 'ABC';
  B := 'CDE';
  Print([a, b, 'asdasd', 'fasd', ' ']);
end.
  • That's not quite true. It is used in RTL. UStrCatN – user15124 Oct 16 '15 at 23:17
  • 1
    @user15124: I did not say they were not used at all. I said they are not used very often. Not even in the RTL. Besides, if you actually look at the implementation of UStrCatN more carefully, you will see it has an ArgCnt fixed parameter. The compiler fills in that value, as it knows how many strings it is concatenating together. – Remy Lebeau Oct 16 '15 at 23:19
  • @user15124: In the RTL, especially in System.pas, there are functions that have quite a bit of compiler magic behind them. IIRC, some even have different parameters than EAX,EDX,ECX, so the System unit can hardly be seen as prime example of pure Delphi. Fact is that Delphi does not (without tricks) allow you to write varargs functions. Use array of const instead. – Rudy Velthuis Oct 19 '15 at 7:01
  • Agreed. varags exists in Delphi only for consuming variadic C functions, like printf() and wsprintf(). It is not meant for writing such functions. The documentation even says so: "The varargs directive works only with external routines and only with the cdecl calling convention." – Remy Lebeau Oct 19 '15 at 16:11

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