1

Here is my code:

template<class T>
void Matrix<T>::set(const int i, const int j, const T v) {
    try {
        m[i][j] = v;
    } catch (std::exception& e) {
        std::cout << "Standard exception: " << e.what() << std::endl;
    }
}

But, I am on the safe side here? I mean, it is possible that i and/or j are out of bound, but the program receives on segmentation fault, will then an exception been thrown?

If this is not a good approach, then should I use assert() maybe?

  • "No" to all questions. "It depends" for the last one. – Ivan Aksamentov - Drop Oct 16 '15 at 22:54
  • 1
    @juanchopanza That wasn't the question....! – gsamaras Oct 16 '15 at 23:15
  • 1
    I can re-open the question, no problem. The duplicate came from the "related" links, meaning it isn't hard to find. Don't worry too much about a single down-vote, there could be all kinds of reasons for that. – juanchopanza Oct 16 '15 at 23:25
  • 1
    @gsamaras Don't worry it happens sometimes. Arrays don't trow exceptions. Error handling in C++ is a complex opinionated topic (because C++ applications from embedded to mainframes are very different). I would recommend you to look at famous book list and specifically Chapter II.13 of Bjarne's book, so you could find out your own truth. – Ivan Aksamentov - Drop Oct 16 '15 at 23:26
  • 1
    Another good discussion of C++ error handling is in Sutter, Alexandrescu -- Coding Standards. – Ivan Aksamentov - Drop Oct 16 '15 at 23:33
3

No.

Exception checking is maybe okay (but not at all elegant) when only reading from the array.

When writing, however, you risk overwriting "foreign" memory, that is a huge security risk, plus it might alter the execution flow by overwriting stack frames and who knows what - that is, there are certainly circumstances when the exception handler won't run even if it is actually expected to throw.

The best decision is to check indices on every iteration. Given that you mentioned asserting, I suppose you do know the array dimensions to start with.

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes I do, thanks! Do you think that the question was so bad? – gsamaras Oct 16 '15 at 23:13
  • No, actually. It is important to understand what's going on even for those who know best practices. – Victor Oct 16 '15 at 23:15
  • Well the score is -1, so somebody things the question is bad and I would like to know why. – gsamaras Oct 16 '15 at 23:16
  • 2
    They probably wanted to refer that you could perhaps use the search in the first place, as it has been marked as a duplicate, and not to the question itself. – Victor Oct 16 '15 at 23:24
6

Just add bounds checks.

C++ does not do bounds checking on arrays, let alone throw exceptions.

With vectors/std::array you can use the .at() method instead of [] operator to get checking.

Lastly, GSL introduces the array_view which lets you add "zero cost annotation" so that analysis tools can do the bounds checking. There is no de-facto standard implementation of GSL that has emerged yet. See also:

| improve this answer | |
3
template<class T>
void Matrix<T>::set(const int i, const int j, const T v) {
    try {
        m[i][j] = v;
    } catch (std::exception& e) {
        std::cout << "Standard exception: " << e.what() << std::endl;
    }
}

You don't mention what type m is, but assuming it's a custom type that does bounds checking in operator[], then you should be okay. The bounds check will (or should) happen, and an exception should be thrown, before any attempt at an out-of-bounds write.

But note that C++ doesn't do bounds checking itself on raw (C) arrays, and neither do any of the standard library types in their operator[] implementations, so if m is one of these types then you'll never get an exception thrown. Instead, STL types provide an at() method which you should use instead if bounds checking is desired.

| improve this answer | |

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