I have to split a vector into n chunks of equal size in R. I couldn't find any base function to do that. Also Google didn't get me anywhere. So here is what I came up with, hopefully it helps someone some where.

x <- 1:10
n <- 3
chunk <- function(x,n) split(x, factor(sort(rank(x)%%n)))
chunk(x,n)
$`0`
[1] 1 2 3

$`1`
[1] 4 5 6 7

$`2`
[1]  8  9 10

Any comments, suggestions or improvements are really welcome and appreciated.

Cheers, Sebastian

  • 4
    Yes, it's very unclear that what you get is the solution to "n chunks of equal size". But maybe this gets you there too: x <- 1:10; n <- 3; split(x, cut(x, n, labels = FALSE)) – mdsumner Jul 23 '10 at 14:08
  • both the solution in the question, and the solution in the preceding comment are incorrect, in that they might not work, if the vector has repeated entries. Try this: > foo <- c(rep(1, 12), rep(2,3), rep(3,3)) [1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 > chunk(foo, 2) (gives wrong result) > chunk(foo, 3) (also wrong) – mathheadinclouds Apr 29 '13 at 9:21
  • (continuing preceding comment) why? rank(x) doesn't need to be an integer > rank(c(1,1,2,3)) [1] 1.5 1.5 3.0 4.0 so that's why the method in the question fails. this one works (thanks to Harlan below) > chunk2 <- function(x,n) split(x, cut(seq_along(x), n, labels = FALSE)) – mathheadinclouds Apr 29 '13 at 9:33
  • 1
    > split(foo, cut(foo, 3, labels = FALSE)) (also wrong) – mathheadinclouds Apr 29 '13 at 9:34
  • As @mathheadinclouds suggests, the example data is a very special case. Examples that are more general would be more useful and better tests. E.g. x <- c(NA, 4, 3, NA, NA, 2, 1, 1, NA ); y <- letters[x]; z <- factor(y) gives examples with missing data, repeated values, that are not already sorted, and are in different classes (integer, character, factor). – Kalin Feb 21 at 17:39

18 Answers 18

A one-liner splitting d into chunks of size 20:

split(d, ceiling(seq_along(d)/20))

More details: I think all you need is seq_along(), split() and ceiling():

> d <- rpois(73,5)
> d
 [1]  3  1 11  4  1  2  3  2  4 10 10  2  7  4  6  6  2  1  1  2  3  8  3 10  7  4
[27]  3  4  4  1  1  7  2  4  6  0  5  7  4  6  8  4  7 12  4  6  8  4  2  7  6  5
[53]  4  5  4  5  5  8  7  7  7  6  2  4  3  3  8 11  6  6  1  8  4
> max <- 20
> x <- seq_along(d)
> d1 <- split(d, ceiling(x/max))
> d1
$`1`
 [1]  3  1 11  4  1  2  3  2  4 10 10  2  7  4  6  6  2  1  1  2

$`2`
 [1]  3  8  3 10  7  4  3  4  4  1  1  7  2  4  6  0  5  7  4  6

$`3`
 [1]  8  4  7 12  4  6  8  4  2  7  6  5  4  5  4  5  5  8  7  7

$`4`
 [1]  7  6  2  4  3  3  8 11  6  6  1  8  4
  • 23
    The question asks for n chunks of equal size. This gets you an unknown number of chunks of size n. I had the same problem and used the solutions from @mathheadinclouds. – rrs Apr 21 '14 at 18:26
  • 2
    As one can see from the output of d1, this answer does not split d into groups of equal size (4 is obviously shorter). Thus it does not answer the question. – Calimo Jan 23 '15 at 16:39
  • 8
    @rrs : split(d, ceiling(seq_along(d)/(length(d)/n))) – gkcn Jun 5 '15 at 11:45
  • I know this is quite old but it may be of help to those who stumble here. Although the OP's question was to split into chunks of equal size, if the vector happens not to be a multiple of the divisor, the last chink will have a different size than chunk. To split into n-chunks I used max <- length(d)%/%n. I used this with a vector of 31 strings and obtained a list of 3 vectors of 10 sentences and one of 1 sentence. – salvu Feb 4 '17 at 12:59
chunk2 <- function(x,n) split(x, cut(seq_along(x), n, labels = FALSE)) 
simplified version...
n = 3
split(x, sort(x%%n))
  • I like this as it gives you chunks that are as equally sized as possible (good for dividing up large task e.g. to accommodate limited RAM or to run a task across multiple threads). – alexvpickering Jul 21 '16 at 22:13
  • 1
    This is useful, but keep in mind this will only work on numeric vectors. – Keith Hughitt Aug 24 '16 at 17:49
  • @KeithHughitt this can be solved with factors and returning the levels as numeric. Or at least this is how I implemented it. – drmariod Apr 5 at 7:02

This will split it differently to what you have, but is still quite a nice list structure I think:

chunk.2 <- function(x, n, force.number.of.groups = TRUE, len = length(x), groups = trunc(len/n), overflow = len%%n) { 
  if(force.number.of.groups) {
    f1 <- as.character(sort(rep(1:n, groups)))
    f <- as.character(c(f1, rep(n, overflow)))
  } else {
    f1 <- as.character(sort(rep(1:groups, n)))
    f <- as.character(c(f1, rep("overflow", overflow)))
  }

  g <- split(x, f)

  if(force.number.of.groups) {
    g.names <- names(g)
    g.names.ordered <- as.character(sort(as.numeric(g.names)))
  } else {
    g.names <- names(g[-length(g)])
    g.names.ordered <- as.character(sort(as.numeric(g.names)))
    g.names.ordered <- c(g.names.ordered, "overflow")
  }

  return(g[g.names.ordered])
}

Which will give you the following, depending on how you want it formatted:

> x <- 1:10; n <- 3
> chunk.2(x, n, force.number.of.groups = FALSE)
$`1`
[1] 1 2 3

$`2`
[1] 4 5 6

$`3`
[1] 7 8 9

$overflow
[1] 10

> chunk.2(x, n, force.number.of.groups = TRUE)
$`1`
[1] 1 2 3

$`2`
[1] 4 5 6

$`3`
[1]  7  8  9 10

Running a couple of timings using these settings:

set.seed(42)
x <- rnorm(1:1e7)
n <- 3

Then we have the following results:

> system.time(chunk(x, n)) # your function 
   user  system elapsed 
 29.500   0.620  30.125 

> system.time(chunk.2(x, n, force.number.of.groups = TRUE))
   user  system elapsed 
  5.360   0.300   5.663 

EDIT: Changing from as.factor() to as.character() in my function made it twice as fast.

Try the ggplot2 function, cut_number:

library(ggplot2)
x <- 1:10
n <- 3
cut_number(x, n) # labels = FALSE if you just want an integer result
#>  [1] [1,4]  [1,4]  [1,4]  [1,4]  (4,7]  (4,7]  (4,7]  (7,10] (7,10] (7,10]
#> Levels: [1,4] (4,7] (7,10]

# if you want it split into a list:
split(x, cut_number(x, n))
#> $`[1,4]`
#> [1] 1 2 3 4
#> 
#> $`(4,7]`
#> [1] 5 6 7
#> 
#> $`(7,10]`
#> [1]  8  9 10
  • 1
    This does not work for splitting up the x, y, or z defined in this comment. In particular, it sorts the results, which may or may not be okay, depending on the application. – Kalin Feb 21 at 17:42
  • Rather, this comment. – Kalin Feb 21 at 17:48

A few more variants to the pile...

> x <- 1:10
> n <- 3

Note, that you don't need to use the factor function here, but you still want to sort o/w your first vector would be 1 2 3 10:

> chunk <- function(x, n) split(x, sort(rank(x) %% n))
> chunk(x,n)
$`0`
[1] 1 2 3
$`1`
[1] 4 5 6 7
$`2`
[1]  8  9 10

Or you can assign character indices, vice the numbers in left ticks above:

> my.chunk <- function(x, n) split(x, sort(rep(letters[1:n], each=n, len=length(x))))
> my.chunk(x, n)
$a
[1] 1 2 3 4
$b
[1] 5 6 7
$c
[1]  8  9 10

Or you can use plainword names stored in a vector. Note that using sort to get consecutive values in x alphabetizes the labels:

> my.other.chunk <- function(x, n) split(x, sort(rep(c("tom", "dick", "harry"), each=n, len=length(x))))
> my.other.chunk(x, n)
$dick
[1] 1 2 3
$harry
[1] 4 5 6
$tom
[1]  7  8  9 10

You could combine the split/cut, as suggested by mdsummer, with quantile to create even groups:

split(x,cut(x,quantile(x,(0:n)/n), include.lowest=TRUE, labels=FALSE))

This gives the same result for your example, but not for skewed variables.

Here's another variant.

NOTE: with this sample you're specifying the CHUNK SIZE in the second parameter

  1. all chunks are uniform, except for the last;
  2. the last will at worst be smaller, never bigger than the chunk size.

chunk <- function(x,n)
{
    f <- sort(rep(1:(trunc(length(x)/n)+1),n))[1:length(x)]
    return(split(x,f))
}

#Test
n<-c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)

c<-chunk(n,5)

q<-lapply(c, function(r) cat(r,sep=",",collapse="|") )
#output
1,2,3,4,5,|6,7,8,9,10,|11,|

split(x,matrix(1:n,n,length(x))[1:length(x)])

perhaps this is more clear, but the same idea:
split(x,rep(1:n, ceiling(length(x)/n),length.out = length(x)))

if you want it ordered,throw a sort around it

I needed the same function and have read the previous solutions, however i also needed to have the unbalanced chunk to be at the end i.e if i have 10 elements to split them into vectors of 3 each, then my result should have vectors with 3,3,4 elements respectively. So i used the following (i left the code unoptimised for readability, otherwise no need to have many variables):

chunk <- function(x,n){
  numOfVectors <- floor(length(x)/n)
  elementsPerVector <- c(rep(n,numOfVectors-1),n+length(x) %% n)
  elemDistPerVector <- rep(1:numOfVectors,elementsPerVector)
  split(x,factor(elemDistPerVector))
}
set.seed(1)
x <- rnorm(10)
n <- 3
chunk(x,n)
$`1`
[1] -0.6264538  0.1836433 -0.8356286

$`2`
[1]  1.5952808  0.3295078 -0.8204684

$`3`
[1]  0.4874291  0.7383247  0.5757814 -0.3053884

Simple function for splitting a vector by simply using indexes - no need to over complicate this

vsplit <- function(v, n) {
    l = length(v)
    r = l/n
    return(lapply(1:n, function(i) {
        s = max(1, round(r*(i-1))+1)
        e = min(l, round(r*i))
        return(v[s:e])
    }))
}
  • Simple and WAY faster than split. – AF7 Jun 26 at 15:40
  • Beautiful solution! Thanks! – mattador Aug 31 at 16:21

If you don't like split() and you don't like matrix() (with its dangling NAs), there's this:

chunk <- function(x, n) (mapply(function(a, b) (x[a:b]), seq.int(from=1, to=length(x), by=n), pmin(seq.int(from=1, to=length(x), by=n)+(n-1), length(x)), SIMPLIFY=FALSE))

Like split(), it returns a list, but it doesn't waste time or space with labels, so it may be more performant.

Credit to @Sebastian for this function

chunk <- function(x,y){
         split(x, factor(sort(rank(row.names(x))%%y)))
         }

If you don't like split() and you don't mind NAs padding out your short tail:

chunk <- function(x, n) { if((length(x)%%n)==0) {return(matrix(x, nrow=n))} else {return(matrix(append(x, rep(NA, n-(length(x)%%n))), nrow=n))} }

The columns of the returned matrix ([,1:ncol]) are the droids you are looking for.

I need a function that takes the argument of a data.table (in quotes) and another argument that is the upper limit on the number of rows in the subsets of that original data.table. This function produces whatever number of data.tables that upper limit allows for:

library(data.table)    
split_dt <- function(x,y) 
    {
    for(i in seq(from=1,to=nrow(get(x)),by=y)) 
        {df_ <<- get(x)[i:(i + y)];
            assign(paste0("df_",i),df_,inherits=TRUE)}
    rm(df_,inherits=TRUE)
    }

This function gives me a series of data.tables named df_[number] with the starting row from the original data.table in the name. The last data.table can be short and filled with NAs so you have to subset that back to whatever data is left. This type of function is useful because certain GIS software have limits on how many address pins you can import, for example. So slicing up data.tables into smaller chunks may not be recommended, but it may not be avoidable.

Sorry if this answer comes so late, but maybe it can be useful for someone else. Actually there is a very useful solution to this problem, explained at the end of ?split.

> testVector <- c(1:10) #I want to divide it into 5 parts
> VectorList <- split(testVector, 1:5)
> VectorList
$`1`
[1] 1 6

$`2`
[1] 2 7

$`3`
[1] 3 8

$`4`
[1] 4 9

$`5`
[1]  5 10
  • this will break if there are unequal number of values in each group! – Matifou Sep 10 at 21:31

Yet another possibility is the splitIndices function from package parallel:

library(parallel)
splitIndices(20, 3)

Gives:

[[1]]
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

[[2]]
[1]  8  9 10 11 12 13

[[3]]
[1] 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Wow, this question got more traction than expected.

Thanks for all the ideas. I have come up with this solution:

require(magrittr)
create.chunks <- function(x, elements.per.chunk){
    # plain R version
    # split(x, rep(seq_along(x), each = elements.per.chunk)[seq_along(x)])
    # magrittr version - because that's what people use now
    x %>% seq_along %>% rep(., each = elements.per.chunk) %>% extract(seq_along(x)) %>% split(x, .) 
}
create.chunks(letters[1:10], 3)
$`1`
[1] "a" "b" "c"

$`2`
[1] "d" "e" "f"

$`3`
[1] "g" "h" "i"

$`4`
[1] "j"

The key is to use the seq(each = chunk.size) parameter so make it work. Using seq_along acts like rank(x) in my previous solution, but is actually able to produce the correct result with duplicate entries.

  • For those concerned that rep(seq_along(x), each = elements.per.chunk) might be too straining on the memory: yes it does. You could try a modified version of my previous suggestion: chunk <- function(x,n) split(x, factor(seq_along(x)%%n)) – Sebastian Sep 19 at 11:13

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