85

This is my dataframe:

          date                          ids
0     2011-04-23  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,...
1     2011-04-24  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,...
2     2011-04-25  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,...
3     2011-04-26  Nan
4     2011-04-27  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,...
5     2011-04-28  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,...

I want to replace Nan with []. How to do that? .fillna([]) did not work. I even tried replace(np.nan, []) but it gives error:

 TypeError('Invalid "to_replace" type: \'float\'',)
4
  • how did you get lists in ids ? Oct 18, 2015 at 14:38
  • 1
    Empty list cannot be assigned, would df.ix[df['ids'].isnull(), 'ids'] = set() set work?
    – Zero
    Oct 18, 2015 at 14:38
  • 1
    Note that one reason this is so hard is because you're not really meant to store nonscalar values in dataframe cells. You can do it, and it's sometimes handy as an intermediate step (there are a number of built-in methods which generate lists as elements), but there's not strong support for it yet.
    – DSM
    Oct 18, 2015 at 17:03
  • 1
    Interestingly, I managed to run an infinite loop (reaching RecursionError) using: df.ids.where(df.ids.isnull(), [[]]). Oct 30, 2019 at 18:10

14 Answers 14

68

My approach is similar to @hellpanderrr's, but instead tests for list-ness rather than using isnan:

df['ids'] = df['ids'].apply(lambda d: d if isinstance(d, list) else [])

I originally tried using pd.isnull (or pd.notnull) but, when given a list, that returns the null-ness of each element.

1
  • 2
    If you need to do it across a whole dataframe, this worked for me: df = df.applymap(lambda d: d if isinstance(d, list) else []) Jul 21, 2023 at 9:35
49

A simple solution would be:

df['ids'].fillna("").apply(list)

As noted by @timgeb, this requires df['ids'] to contain lists or nan only.

4
  • 5
    Cool! Note that this requires df['ids'] to contain lists only, apart from missing values (this is the case in OP's example).
    – timgeb
    Feb 4, 2021 at 15:41
  • 2
    I have tested the @Nick Edgar method with yours. Yours is almost 2x faster. Thanks...
    – Memin
    Sep 19, 2021 at 11:15
  • Thanks for the solution. Do you know how to do it for a empty list of 4 elements ? May 9, 2022 at 17:33
  • @ThomasLESIEUR you could try to do a .replace{"": whatever}) instead of the .apply(list)
    – ronkov
    May 10, 2022 at 10:44
41

After a lot of head-scratching I found this method that should be the most efficient (no looping, no apply), just assigning to a slice:

isnull = df.ids.isnull()

df.loc[isnull, 'ids'] = [ [[]] * isnull.sum() ]

The trick was to construct your list of [] of the right size (isnull.sum()), and then enclose it in a list: the value you are assigning is a 2D array (1 column, isnull.sum() rows) containing empty lists as elements.

4
  • 2
    This is the most efficient answer.
    – HaPsantran
    Jun 26, 2019 at 19:25
  • Note that [[]] * isnull.sum() does not create isnull.sum() amount of empty lists, it is creating exactly one empty list with multiple references.
    – timgeb
    Jul 6, 2020 at 5:28
  • For some reason that didn't work for me, but a simple df.loc[isnull, 'ids'] = [[]] does the trick. Might have changed with newer pandas versions.
    – Khris
    Sep 7, 2020 at 10:55
  • 4
    I like this answer a lot due to avoiding the potentially costly apply, but I get the error 'must have equal len keys and value when setting with an ndarray'. Simply doing [[]] as @Khris suggests gives me the same error. However, stackoverflow.com/a/61944174/4345899 seems to work, so isna = df[col].isna(); df.loc[isna, [col]] = pd.Series([[]] * isna.sum()).values in pandas==1.2.2
    – low_ghost
    Aug 1, 2021 at 13:27
26

You can first use loc to locate all rows that have a nan in the ids column, and then loop through these rows using at to set their values to an empty list:

for row in df.loc[df.ids.isnull(), 'ids'].index:
    df.at[row, 'ids'] = []

>>> df
        date                                             ids
0 2011-04-23  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
1 2011-04-24  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
2 2011-04-25  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
3 2011-04-26                                              []
4 2011-04-27  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
5 2011-04-28  [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
0
12

Surprisingly, passing a dict with empty lists as values seems to work for Series.fillna, but not DataFrame.fillna - so if you want to work on a single column you can use this:

>>> df
     A    B    C
0  0.0  2.0  NaN
1  NaN  NaN  5.0
2  NaN  7.0  NaN
>>> df['C'].fillna({i: [] for i in df.index})
0    []
1     5
2    []
Name: C, dtype: object

The solution can be extended to DataFrames by applying it to every column.

>>> df.apply(lambda s: s.fillna({i: [] for i in df.index}))
    A   B   C
0   0   2  []
1  []  []   5
2  []   7  []

Note: for large Series/DataFrames with few missing values, this might create an unreasonable amount of throwaway empty lists.

Tested with pandas 1.0.5.

1
  • 1
    Someone's going to kill me for using this :) Nice find! May 25, 2021 at 14:40
4

Another solution using numpy:

df.ids = np.where(df.ids.isnull(), pd.Series([[]]*len(df)), df.ids)

Or using combine_first:

df.ids = df.ids.combine_first(pd.Series([[]]*len(df)))
3

Without assignments:

1) Assuming we have only floats and integers in our dataframe

import math
df.apply(lambda x:x.apply(lambda x:[] if math.isnan(x) else x))

2) For any dataframe

import math
def isnan(x):
    if isinstance(x, (int, long, float, complex)) and math.isnan(x):
        return True

df.apply(lambda x:x.apply(lambda x:[] if isnan(x) else x))
1
  • considering that numpy is already imported as np, the following line would be adequate ... df.apply(lambda x: x.apply(lambda x: [] if x is np.nan else x)) Dec 4, 2019 at 10:39
3

Maybe not the most short/optimized solution, but I think is pretty readable:

# Masking-in nans
mask = df['ids'].isna()

# Filling nans with a list-like string and literally-evaluating such string
df.loc[mask, 'ids'] = df.loc[mask, 'ids'].fillna('[]').apply(eval)

EDIT

Following the advice from Swier's comment:

# Packages
import ast

# Masking-in nans
mask = df['ids'].isna()

# Filling nans with a list-like string and literally-evaluating such string
df.loc[mask, 'ids'] = df.loc[mask, 'ids'].fillna('[]').apply(ast.literal_eval)
1
  • 1
    Instead of eval, please use ast.literal_eval, which has far fewer security ramifications. Though this specific code is secure (I think), it's only a small mismatch in the mask away from arbitrary code execution.
    – Swier
    Aug 23, 2023 at 13:37
1

Maybe more dense:

df['ids'] = [[] if type(x) != list else x for x in df['ids']]
1

This is probably faster, one liner solution:

df['ids'].fillna('DELETE').apply(lambda x : [] if x=='DELETE' else x)
1

You can try this:

df.fillna(df.notna().applymap(lambda x: x or []))
1

Another solution that is explicit:

# use apply to only replace the nulls with the list  
df.loc[df.ids.isnull(), 'ids'] = df.loc[df.ids.isnull(), 'ids'].apply(lambda x: [])
0

Create a function that checks your condition, if not, it returns an empty list/empty set etc.

Then apply that function to the variable, but also assigning the new calculated variable to the old one or to a new variable if you wish.

aa=pd.DataFrame({'d':[1,1,2,3,3,np.NaN],'r':[3,5,5,5,5,'e']})


def check_condition(x):
    if x>0:
        return x
    else:
        return list()

aa['d]=aa.d.apply(lambda x:check_condition(x))
0

I have solved a more complex case and want to share the solution here.

![enter image description here

In each cell of the DataFrame there is a nested List with 100x sublists [a, b] inside. Some values for the columns bids_aggr3 and asks_aggr3 are np.nan. The number of NA columns is unknown. The example above shows only 2.

The goal is to use the pd.explode() to expand each row to 100x rows that containing one sublist of the original cell for each column respectively. This requires however that the values in each cell (nested lists) have same length. So i need to fill the NA's with a nested List like [[na, na], [na, na], ...[na, na]] with the length 100.

After some research i came to a generic solution which can replace NA's without specifying the columns.

nan_cell = [[np.nan, np.nan]]*100
rows = df.loc[df.isna().any(axis=1)].index
columns = df.columns[df.isna().any(axis=0)]
df.loc[rows, columns] = pd.Series([nan_cell]*len(rows))

In the line 1 the new nested List is generated. In the line 2 and 3 the rows and columns with NA's are located. In the line 4 use loc() to set the nested List as value for each NA cell. The loc() requires a Scala or Serie with the same length as input.

The result looks like this:

enter image description here

A quick check of the value in the first row:

enter image description here

HOWEVER! If the NA's are not occurring in sequence or not from the the top or the bottom of the column, rather somewhere mid in the dataframe and in different rows for each column, the solution above will not work.

In this case you can use the [index, column] pairs to directly access each cell to modify the values.

Example:

df = pd.DataFrame({'a': [0, 1, 2, np.nan, np.nan, 5, 6], 'b': [22, 23, 2, 1, 0, np.nan, 99]})

enter image description here

mask=df.isna().stack()
cells = mask.loc[mask].index.tolist()
cells
# idx, idy = np.where(pd.isnull(df))
# cells = np.column_stack([df.index[idx], df.columns[idy]])
# cells
for i in result:
    df.at[i[0], i[1]] = pd.Series([[np.nan, np,nan]])

enter image description here

The For loop could be performance bottleneck if the DataFrame is large. If someone knows a more pythonic/vectorized way, please share the solution.

Hopefully someone will find this helpful. Cheers!

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