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I'm trying to understand subnet masks. I was given the question below and chose the answer of /30 since it seems that each subnet needs only one host IP. /31 was not a possible answer. However, the answer is /29. Can anyone clarify why that is correct?

"Which of the following would the security engineer set as the subnet mask for the servers below to utilize host addresses on separate broadcast domains?"

Server 1: 192.168.100.6 
Server 2: 192.168.100.9 
Server 3: 192.169.100.20
  • /30 is not possible, as 192.169.100.20 would be the network address of the 6th subnet. – CustomX Nov 4 '15 at 12:24
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A /29 mask provides 6 usable addresses and creates the following subnets.

192.169.100.0 - 192.169.100.7
192.169.100.8 - 192.169.100.15
192.169.100.16 - 192.169.100.23

A /30 mask provides 2 usable addresses and creates the following subnets

192.169.100.0 - 192.169.100.3
192.169.100.4 - 192.169.100.7
192.169.100.8 - 192.169.100.11
192.169.100.12 - 192.169.100.15
192.169.100.16 - 192.169.100.19
192.169.100.20 - 192.169.100.23

So /30 isn't an option because the 192.169.100.20/30 is a network address and not usable as server IP address. /29 is the correct answer!

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    Ah, right - good answer. Hadn't thought about that. This should be the accepted answer. – user1676075 Nov 4 '15 at 16:28
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Convert everything to binary:

 6 = 00000110
 9 = 00001001
20 = 00010100

OK, so mask of 29:

29 = 00011101
30 = 00011110

The only difference between those two is which of the two lower-order bits of 6 and 9 you examine. So I'd agree with you that, without further information, either 29 or 30 is a valid answer.

  • /30 is not possible, as 192.169.100.20 would be the network address of the 6th subnet. – CustomX Nov 4 '15 at 12:23

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