I have the following viewmodels:

public class CustomerViewModel
{        
    public string FirstName { get; set; }       
    public string LastName { get; set; }       
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

public class InvoiceViewModel
{
    public int InvoiceID { get; set; }          
    public int Quantity { get; set; }       
    public double Price { get; set; }        
    public double Tax { get; set; }
}

public class CombinedViewModel
{
    public InvoiceViewModel InvoiceViewModel { get; set; }
    public CustomerViewModel CustomerViewModel { get; set; }

}

I'm trying to query the CombinedViewModel with linq but am having trouble accessing the variables of the nested viewmodels.

 var invoice = (from i in db.Invoices
                           select new CombinedViewModel
                           {             
                               //Not allowing me to access variables. 
                               //Not in context error                
                               InvoiceViewModel.Quantity = i.Quantity
                       });
  • What do you mean by //Not valid. Is it throwing an exception (because you have not shown any code that initializes InvoiceViewModel) – Stephen Muecke Oct 19 '15 at 1:49
  • Sorry if i was vague @StephenMuecke. It does not allow me to access the variables of the nested viewmodels. My guess is it wants an entire object to be assigned. – user3281114 Oct 19 '15 at 1:53
  • You need to initialize your properties, either in a default constructor for CombinedViewModel or in the query. – Stephen Muecke Oct 19 '15 at 1:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The 'nested' viewmodels InvoiceViewModel and CustomerViewModel are objects that are not automatically instantiated. You will need to create them yourself:

var invoice = (from i in db.Invoices
    select new CombinedViewModel
    {
        InvoiceViewModel = new InvoiceViewModel {
            Quantity = i.Quantity
        },
        CustomerViewModel = new CustomerViewModel {
            // whatever goes here
        }
    });

Personally I'd add some sort of constructor or type conversion to take your data model objects and make view models of them, and I'd certainly suggest that you change your member names to be distinct from their types to make your code easier to read... but those are just style choices, I guess.

For example, assume you have an InvoiceModel class that looks like this:

public class InvoiceModel
{
    public int InvoiceID { get; set; }
    public int Quantity { get; set; }
    public double Price { get; set; }
    public double TaxRate { get; set; }
}

You can add an implicit conversion to it like so:

public static implicit operator InvoiceViewModel(InvoiceModel model)
{
    return new InvoiceViewModel
    {
        InvoiceID = model.InvoiceID,
        Quantity = model.Quantity,
        Price = model.Price,
        Tax = model.Price * model.TaxRate
    };
}

Now you can do:

from i in db.Invoices
select new CombinedViewModel 
    { 
        InvoiceViewModel = i, 
        CustomerViewModel = new CustomerViewModel() 
    }

Alternatively, add this constructor to your InvoiceViewModel:

public InvoiceViewModel(InvoiceModel model)
{
    InvoiceID = model.InvoiceID;
    Quantity = model.Quantity;
    Price = model.Price;
    Tax = model.Price * model.TaxRate;
}

And then do:

from i in db.Invoices
select new CombinedViewModel 
    { 
        InvoiceViewModel = new InvoiceViewModel(i), 
        CustomerViewModel = new CustomerViewModel() 
    }
  • How do you suggest I change the method/variable names for better readability? – user3281114 Oct 19 '15 at 2:14
  • Considering the context, and that the types make it clear that these are view models, why not just call them Invoice and Customer? – Corey Oct 19 '15 at 2:37

Try the following code

var invoice = (from i in db.Invoices
                           select new CombinedViewModel
                           {             
                               //Not valid                  
                               InvoiceViewModel=new InvoiceViewModel{Quantity = i.Quantity}
                   });

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