0

I am using a RunListener to let test fail when they write to System.out, but when I fail() a unittest, the listener is removed. Is there any way to let tests fail without removing the Listener?

For clarification a code example

public class OutputListenerTest {
  @Test
  public void testPrintIsDicovered() {
    JUnitCore runner = new JUnitCore();
    // the OutputListener calls fail() when something was written
    runner.addListener(new OutputListener());
    Result result = runner.run(TestWithOutput.class);
  }

  public static class TestWithOutput {
    @Test
    public void testOutput1() {
      System.out.println("foo");
    }

    @Test
    public void testOutput2() {
      System.out.println("bar");
    }
  }
}

What I'd expect: 2 failed tests
What is: The first test fails and the Listener is removed.

As requested, here is the OutputListener code http://paste.robbi5.com/4916ca5b Is it ok to not paste it here, it's pretty long and won't help solving the question?

a little more context
I picked the RunListener, because it works pretty easy with maven, just add

  <properties>
    <property>
      <name>listener</name>
      <value>OutputListener</value>
    </property>
  </properties> 

to the maven-surefire-plugin and mvn test shows what tests use System.out in some way.

9
  • 1
    Personally, I would probably simply add a custom TestRule... Should work to wrap the actual in a Verifier to check the Output. Oct 19 '15 at 7:39
  • I've created this example and the my listener isn't removed, so I would look at your listener code. Can you supply it?
    – dom farr
    Oct 19 '15 at 7:40
  • Apidoc says "If a listener throws an exception while processing a test event, it will be removed for the remainder of the test run." And when debug and step through the tests, removeListener is called. So I am pretty sure the Listener is removed :) Oct 19 '15 at 8:09
  • So the problem, as I suggested, is the the listener. If the listener does not throw an exception it will continue for all tests.
    – dom farr
    Oct 19 '15 at 8:51
  • 1
    listeners, listen, they don't (or shouldn't) interact with the test.
    – dom farr
    Oct 19 '15 at 9:14
1

Add a Runner to add the listener.

public class AddListenerRunner extends BlockJUnit4ClassRunner {

    public AddListenerRunner(Class<?> klass) throws InitializationError {
        super(klass);
    }

    @Override public void run(RunNotifier notifier){
        notifier.addListener(new OutputListener());
        super.run(notifier);
    }
}

You can then use that in your tests like this.

@RunWith(AddListenerRunner.class)
public class OutputListenerTest {
    @Test
    public void testOutput1() {
      System.out.println("foo");
    }

    @Test
    public void testOutput2() {
      System.out.println("bar");
    }
}
2
  • 1
    um.. wouldn't that result in a lot of the same Listeners when the tests don't fail? Also I would prefer a solution where I don't have to change every testclass I've got. Your approach is basically right, overriding the run method would work. Oct 19 '15 at 8:15
  • "Opt-in by default" would be a much more preferable solution to the problem. If it is required to add an annotation for nearly all test cases, an explicit opt-out to the default opt-in is the better approach.
    – user3001
    Oct 29 '15 at 8:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.