I am declaring a base "Class" for a Dijit Custom widget.

When in 'strict mode' routine this.inherited(arguments); is being called, I receive this error:

Uncaught TypeError: 'caller', 'callee', and 'arguments' properties may not be accessed on strict mode functions or the arguments objects for calls to them

I need to keep the usage 'strict mode'.

Any idea how to solve it?

define([
    'dojo/_base/declare',
    'dojo/topic',
    'dojo/_base/lang'
], function (
    declare,
    topic,
    lang
    ) {
    'use strict';
    var attachTo = 'myPanels';
    return declare(null, {
        id: null,
        title: null,
        postCreate: function () {
            // ERROR HERE
            this.inherited(arguments);
            this.placeAt(attachTo);
        },
        constructor: function () {
        },
    });
});

Notes: removing 'strict mode' solve the issue, but is not an option in my case as I need to use 'strict mode'.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is known issue, Dojo uses arguments.callee for introspection and to determine the inherited (more precisely the next) method. To workaround this issue you need to create your own arguments object then specify arguments.callee property and pass it to Dojo for introspection. The only one problem is to pass the function to itself, but it could be easily solved, for example with this helper, place it in a module, for example override.js:

"use strict";
define([], function () {
    var slice = Array.prototype.slice;
    return function (method) {
        var proxy;

        /** @this target object */
        proxy = function () {
            var me = this;
            var inherited = (this.getInherited && this.getInherited({
                // emulating empty arguments
                callee: proxy,
                length: 0
            })) || function () {};

            return method.apply(me, [function () {
                return inherited.apply(me, arguments);
            }].concat(slice.apply(arguments)));
        };

        proxy.method = method;
        proxy.overrides = true;

        return proxy;
    };
});

now you can use it to call inherited methods

define([
    'dojo/_base/declare',
    'dojo/topic',
    'dojo/_base/lang',
    './override'
], function (
    declare,
    topic,
    lang,
    override
    ) {
    'use strict';
    var attachTo = 'myPanels';
    return declare(null, {
        id: null,
        title: null,
        postCreate: override(function (inherited) {
            inherited(); // the inherited method 
            this.placeAt(attachTo);
        }),
        methodWithArgs : override(function(inherited, arg1, arg2)) {
            inherited(arg1, arg2);
            // pass all arguments to the inherited method
            // inherited.apply(null,Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
        }),
        constructor: function () {
        },
    });
});

This issue was addressed in the Dojo framework as of v1.13.0.

Assuming you're using Dojo 1.13.0 or newer, to make a call to this.inherited from a strict-mode file, simply pass a reference to the calling function (use a named function expression or NFE) as the first argument.

So your code above would look like this:

define([
    'dojo/_base/declare',
    'dojo/topic',
    'dojo/_base/lang'
], function (
    declare,
    topic,
    lang
    ) {
    'use strict';
    var attachTo = 'myPanels';
    return declare(null, {
        id: null,
        title: null,
        postCreate: function postCreate() { //(1) add function name
            //(2) pass function reference as the first argument
            this.inherited(postCreate, arguments);
            this.placeAt(attachTo);
        },
        constructor: function () {
        },
    });
});

Note that named function expressions (NFEs) are very buggy in IE8 and earlier, so don't use this if you're supporting those browsers.

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