0

I've implemented a function that returns a string. It takes an integer as a parameter (age), and returns a formatted string.

All is working well, except from the fact that I have some crazy memory leaks. I know strdup() is the cause of this, but I've tried to research some fixes to no avail.

My code is:

const char * returnName(int age) {

    char string[30];

    sprintf( string, "You are %d years old", age);

    return strdup(string);
}

Valgrind's output is:

==15414== LEAK SUMMARY:
==15414==    definitely lost: 6,192 bytes in 516 blocks
==15414==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==15414==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==15414==    still reachable: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==15414==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks

Any help in resolving this memory leak issue is greatly appreciated.

  • 1
    You've shown the code that allocates, where's the code that frees? – Mooing Duck Oct 19 '15 at 22:07
  • 1
    Did you read any documentation for strdup? – juanchopanza Oct 19 '15 at 22:07
  • 1
    Does code eventually free() the pointer returned by returnName()? If not, there is the leak. – chux - Reinstate Monica Oct 19 '15 at 22:07
  • 1
    You need to free the result of strdup at some point, that in turn means you need to change the return-type to just (non-const) char *. – Kninnug Oct 19 '15 at 22:07
  • 1
    How do I free a local variable outside of a function that the variable is local to? To answer the question - I have not freed strdup because of said concern. – user3186023 Oct 19 '15 at 22:09
3

From man strdup:

Memory for the new string is obtained with malloc(3), and can be freed with free(3).

So you need to free the space allocated and returned by strdup.

Say you invoke returnName like that:

 const char* str = returnName(3);

After you're done with str you can free it like this:

free((char*) str);

The cast is needed because free expects a non-const void*. This explicit conversion is alright here because returnName actually should return constant data1. Calling free is only a nasty implementation detail here.


1 As discussed with @M.M in the comments to this answer.

  • What if I am printing in a main method as such: printf("%s", returnName(3)); so there is no variable name such as str assosciated when invoking the method - how would I free it? – user3186023 Oct 19 '15 at 22:18
  • const char* str = returnName(3); printf("%s\n", str); – cadaniluk Oct 19 '15 at 22:19
  • Was hoping I could avoid explicitly declaring a new variable but I guess that'll have to do. Thanks. – user3186023 Oct 19 '15 at 22:21
  • Getting the following error when trying exactly what you typed: note: expected ‘void *’ but argument is of type ‘const char *’ extern void free (void *__ptr) __THROW; – user3186023 Oct 19 '15 at 22:24
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    The function can still return const char *. Const pointers can be freed. You probably meant that pointers to const can't be freed, however you can cast the pointer to void * (or char *) before calling free. – M.M Oct 19 '15 at 22:38
5

strdup() is essentially equivalent to

char* dup = malloc(strlen(original) + 1);
strcpy(dup, original);

So you need to remember to call free() after you're finished using the string.

const char* name = returnName(20);
/* do stuff with name */
free((void*)name);

If you don't call free(), then of course valgrind reports a leak.

  • Asked this below to another user aswell: What if I am printing in a main method as such: printf("%s", returnName(3)); so there is no variable name such as name assosciated when invoking the method - how would I free it? Thanks. – user3186023 Oct 19 '15 at 22:19
  • @user2832891 Then, you've caused a memory leak. You need to associate a variable with it so that you can free it later. – PC Luddite Oct 19 '15 at 22:23
  • @PCLuddite Did you just made a copy of my Answer ? – Michi Oct 19 '15 at 22:50
  • @Michi I didn't try to, but I can see how you might think that. I changed my example to an earlier edit so that there's some variety. – PC Luddite Oct 19 '15 at 23:44
  • @Michi And in the spirit of fair play, I upvoted your answer. I apologize for any infringement. – PC Luddite Oct 19 '15 at 23:51
3

strdup looks something like this:

char *strdup(const char *str){
    size_t n = strlen(str) + 1;
    char *dup = malloc(n);

    if(dup){
        strcpy(dup, str);
    }

    return dup;
}

As you can see there is malloc involved too, which means that at some point after you dynamically allocate that memory using strdup you have to free it after you don't need it any more.

1

the cause of the memory leaks is NOT from the call to strdup() but rather because the caller of the posted function is failing to pass the returned pointer to free() when done with the string.

1
const char * returnName(int age) {
    char string[30];
    sprintf( string, "You are %d years old", age);
    return strdup(string);
}

return type of returnName() is const char*. So, you can not hold the returned value to a char* type variable. Hold returned value to a const char* variable and cast it to char* while make memory free

const char* retName = returnName(3);
// Use retName
free((char*)retName);

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