10

I have a SQL Server 12.0 database that is linked to an Oracle 12.1 database.

I want to create a view in the SQL Server database that returns data from an Oracle table filtered by date. The Oracle table has an index on the date column.

A query that works successfully is:

select * from ORADB..SCHEMA.MYTABLE where MYDATE >= '20140701';

However this runs very slowly. I assume it is because the comparison is taking place in SQL Server so every row is being returned.

If I go:

DECLARE @earliest date = '20140701';
select * from ORADB..SCHEMA.MYTABLE where MYDATE >= @earliest;

Then it runs fast, presumably because the condition is being passed to Oracle so the Oracle index on the table is being used.

My problem is that I want to create a view. I can't find a way of using the second version of the code to create a view. If I simply do:

create myview as select * from ORADB..SCHEMA.MYTABLE where MYDATE >= '20140701';

Then it runs slowly.

Is there another format for the date literal that SQL Server will pass to Oracle, or is there another solution? I wondered also if it was to do with the parameters used in creating the link to Oracle. For reference they are:

USE [master]
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_addlinkedserver @server = N'ORADB', @srvproduct=N'Oracle', @provider=N'OraOLEDB.Oracle', @datasrc=N'DPDB'
EXEC master.dbo.sp_addlinkedsrvlogin @rmtsrvname=N'ORADB',@useself=N'False',@locallogin=NULL,@rmtuser=N'MYUSER',@rmtpassword='#######'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'collation compatible', @optvalue=N'false'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'data access', @optvalue=N'true'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'dist', @optvalue=N'false'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'pub', @optvalue=N'false'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'rpc', @optvalue=N'false'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'rpc out', @optvalue=N'false'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'sub', @optvalue=N'false'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'connect timeout', @optvalue=N'0'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'collation name', @optvalue=null
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'lazy schema validation', @optvalue=N'false'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'query timeout', @optvalue=N'0'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'use remote collation', @optvalue=N'true'
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_serveroption @server=N'ORADB', @optname=N'remote proc transaction promotion', @optvalue=N'true'
GO

EDIT: I just found a very similar question: Forcing a SQL Remote Query to filter remotely instead of locally

  • 1
    Try ISO format '2014-01-01' YYYY-MM-DD – Lukasz Szozda Oct 20 '15 at 5:38
  • Thanks @lad2025, I tried that but it still runs slow. – Richard A Oct 20 '15 at 6:57
  • Since you can't create a view with a parameter, why not just create a function instead ? You can use it like a view, join it, AND have params. – Patrick Honorez Oct 20 '15 at 7:08
  • Thanks @iDevlop, I was trying to keep things simple. That's probably my next approach. The other is to move the filtering of the view back into Oracle, but I was trying to avoid that. – Richard A Oct 20 '15 at 7:10
  • The problem you have is not bound to the format of the date literal... You'll have to find a solution passing your date as a parameter. – Shnugo Oct 20 '15 at 7:28
27

I prefer the ODBC format:

--DateTime
SELECT {ts'2015-09-20 12:30:00'}
--Time (however this comes with "today"-time)
SELECT {t'12:30:00'}
--Date
SELECT {d'2015-09-20'}
GO

The simple date literal is not culture independent...

SET LANGUAGE ENGLISH;
SELECT CAST('2014-09-13' AS DATETIME);
GO
SET LANGUAGE GERMAN;
SELECT CAST('2014-09-13' AS DATETIME);--ERROR: there's no month "13"
GO

But it works - however - with target type DATE (this difference is rather weird...):

SET LANGUAGE ENGLISH;
SELECT CAST('2014-09-13' AS DATE);
GO
SET LANGUAGE GERMAN;
SELECT CAST('2014-09-13' AS DATE);--ERROR: there's no month "13"
GO

Thx to lad2025 I want to add for completness the "full" ISO 8601, which works fine:

SET LANGUAGE ENGLISH;
SELECT CAST('2014-09-13T12:30:00' AS DATETIME);
GO
SET LANGUAGE GERMAN;
SELECT CAST('2014-09-13T12:30:00' AS DATETIME);
GO
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Shnugo. I've tried that but it doesn't solve my problem, still slow. – Richard A Oct 20 '15 at 7:05
  • 2
    @Shungo Maybe I wasn't specific enough about ISO format ISO 8601 Format The advantage in using the ISO 8601 format is that it is an international standard. datetime values that are specified by using this format are unambiguous And Also, this format is not affected by the SET DATEFORMAT or SET LANGUAGE settings. But you have to use full specification with time part. – Lukasz Szozda Oct 20 '15 at 7:06
  • @lad2025. You are rigth with implicit conversion, but just try the second code block. The cast throws an exception because the "13" ist taken as the month... Change the "13" to a smaller number and the cast will come back with two different dates... – Shnugo Oct 20 '15 at 7:09
  • 1
    I wasn't specific enough. Check with full datetime demo. '2014-09-13T00:00:00' is culture independent. There is no error. – Lukasz Szozda Oct 20 '15 at 7:11
  • 1
    @lad2025, OK, together with the "THH:MM:SS"-part it's working fine. But your comment states the "YYYY-MM-DD"-part only... – Shnugo Oct 20 '15 at 7:14
7

I would recommend using the full ISO 8601 format as suggested by @lad2025:

'2017-10-06T14:57:23'

This is superior to the ODBC format suggested by @Shnugo.

In SQL Server 2014 at least, the ODBC format will not work for dates prior to 1753-01-01 (e.g. those dates outside of the range of the old DATETIME data type), whereas the ISO 8601 format does.

To test this yourself, try the following queries:

--This will work
DECLARE @DateISO DATE = '0001-01-01T00:00:00';
SELECT @DateISO;

--This will also work
DECLARE @DatetimeISO DATETIME2 = '0001-01-01T00:00:00';
SELECT @DatetimeISO;

--This will not work
DECLARE @DateODBC DATE = {D '0001-01-01'};
SELECT @DateODBC;

--This will also not work
DECLARE @DatetimeODBC DATETIME2 = {ts '0001-01-01 00:00:00'};
SELECT @DatetimeODBC;

Even if you don't think the dates you're working with will ever be before the year 1753, it's a good habit to be in. I ran into this while looking at setting up a calendar table to reference in queries.

| improve this answer | |
2

If the query is running on Oracle database, then I suggest use the ANSI date literal which uses a fixed Format YYYY-MM-DD.

For example,

DATE '2015-10-20'

In Oracle, '20140701' is a string and not a DATE. You might just be lucky to see an implicit data type conversion and get the result based on the locale-specific NLS settings of your client. You should always avoid it, and explicitly convert the string into date for date comparisons.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks Lalit, I understand that '20140701' is a string in Oracle. I can't use the syntax DATE '2015-10-20' as SQL Server doesn't understand it. That's what I'd use if I was writing the query directly in Oracle. I have tried a variety of date formats. All the advice I found on the net for date literals in SQL Server advised using 20140701 rather than 2014-07-01. – Richard A Oct 20 '15 at 7:00
  • However (this is rather weird...) It is possible to cast and convert this to DATE, But if you cast or convert it to DATETIME, it is not culture independant... Try SET LANGUAGE GERMAN; SELECT CAST('2015-10-20' AS DATE); and then change this to DATETIME – Shnugo Aug 21 '17 at 8:12

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