Why does Android provide 2 interfaces for serializing objects? Do Serializable objects interopt with Android Binder and AIDL files?

13 Answers 13

In Android we know that we cannot just pass objects to activities. The objects must be either implements Serializable or Parcelable interface to do this.

Serializable

Serializable is a standard Java interface. You can just implement Serializable interface and add override methods.The problem with this approach is that reflection is used and it is a slow process. This method create a lot of temporary objects and cause quite a bit of garbage collection. Serializable interface is easier to implement.

Look at the example below (Serializable)

//MyObjects Serializable class

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.TreeMap;

import android.os.Parcel;
import android.os.Parcelable;

public class MyObjects implements Serializable {

    private String name;
    private int age;

    public ArrayList<String> address;

    public MyObjects(String name, int age, ArrayList<String> address) {
        super();
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.address = address;
    }

    public ArrayList<String> getAddress() {
        if (!(address == null))
            return address;
        else
            return new ArrayList<String>();
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public String getAge() {
        return age;
    }
}



//MyObjects instance
MyObjects mObjects = new MyObjects("name","age","Address array here");

//Passing MyObjects instance via intent
Intent mIntent = new Intent(FromActivity.this, ToActivity.class);
mIntent.putExtra("UniqueKey", mObjects);
startActivity(mIntent);


//Getting MyObjects instance
Intent mIntent = getIntent();
MyObjects workorder = (MyObjects)    mIntent.getSerializableExtra("UniqueKey");

Parcelable

Parcelable process is much faster than serializable. One of the reasons for this is that we are being explicit about the serialization process instead of using reflection to infer it. It also stands to reason that the code has been heavily optimized for this purpose.

Look at the example below (Parcelable)

//MyObjects Parcelable class

import java.util.ArrayList;

import android.os.Parcel;
import android.os.Parcelable;

public class MyObjects implements Parcelable {

    private int age;
    private String name;

    private ArrayList<String> address;

    public MyObjects(String name, int age, ArrayList<String> address) {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.address = address;
    }

    public MyObjects(Parcel source) {
        age = source.readInt();
        name = source.readString();
        address = source.createStringArrayList();
    }

    @Override
    public int describeContents() {
        return 0;
    }

    @Override
    public void writeToParcel(Parcel dest, int flags) {
        dest.writeInt(age);
        dest.writeString(name);
        dest.writeStringList(address);
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public ArrayList<String> getAddress() {
        if (!(address == null))
            return address;
        else
            return new ArrayList<String>();
    }

    public static final Creator<MyObjects> CREATOR = new Creator<MyObjects>() {
        @Override
        public MyObjects[] newArray(int size) {
            return new MyObjects[size];
        }

        @Override
        public MyObjects createFromParcel(Parcel source) {
            return new MyObjects(source);
        }
    };

}





MyObjects mObjects = new MyObjects("name","age","Address array here");

//Passing MyOjects instance
Intent mIntent = new Intent(FromActivity.this, ToActivity.class);
mIntent.putExtra("UniqueKey", mObjects);
startActivity(mIntent);


//Getting MyObjects instance
Intent mIntent = getIntent();
MyObjects workorder = (MyObjects) mIntent.getParcelableExtra("UniqueKey");




//You can pass Arraylist of Parceble obect as below

//Array of MyObjects
ArrayList<MyObjects> mUsers;

//Passing MyOjects instance
Intent mIntent = new Intent(FromActivity.this, ToActivity.class);
mIntent.putParcelableArrayListExtra("UniqueKey", mUsers);
startActivity(mIntent);


//Getting MyObjects instance
Intent mIntent = getIntent();
ArrayList<MyObjects> mUsers = mIntent.getParcelableArrayList("UniqueKey");

Conclusion.

  1. Parcelable is faster than serializable interface
  2. Parcelable interface takes more time for implemetation compared to serializable interface
  3. Serializable interface is easier to implement
  4. Serializable interface create a lot of temporary objects and cause quite a bit of garbage collection
  5. Parcelable array can be pass via Intent in android
  • @Sujith what do you mean by reflection is used? What is reflection? – AnV Oct 1 '16 at 14:31
  • 7
    @AbhinavVutukuri Reflection is the term for inspecting objects, fields and methods at run-time via Object.getClass() and such. – FaultException Oct 2 '16 at 10:18
  • 1
    got it... stackoverflow.com/questions/6201311/… – Himanshu Mori Jan 5 '17 at 10:20
  • 2
    Serializables are better for persisting data , parcelable objects on the other hand should not be persisted at all . It's a really bad practice – TheAnimatrix Mar 25 '17 at 11:16
  • 1
    @Sujith As more than one person has stated, Parcelable objects can't be persisted (reliably) but Serializable ones can (within limits). Since your answer is the highest-scoring and gives the impression of covering all the important differences, you should probably mention that point. – LarsH Jul 27 '17 at 13:33

Serializable is a standard Java interface. You simply mark a class Serializable by implementing the interface, and Java will automatically serialize it in certain situations.

Parcelable is an Android specific interface where you implement the serialization yourself. It was created to be far more efficient that Serializable, and to get around some problems with the default Java serialization scheme.

I believe that Binder and AIDL work with Parcelable objects.

However, you can use Serializable objects in Intents.

  • 1
    how do I serialize a Parcelable object? How do I make it persistent? – Hades Jul 12 '11 at 11:43
  • @Haded Get the contents of the objects state and store it in a file or SQLLite database. Seriliasing is useful for making objects transferable between different components in android or different applications altogether. – jonney Apr 4 '13 at 23:38
  • 5
    This is a great explanation. I also noticed this: "Parcel is not a general-purpose serialization mechanism. This class (and the corresponding Parcelable API for placing arbitrary objects into a Parcel) is designed as a high-performance IPC transport. As such, it is not appropriate to place any Parcel data in to persistent storage: changes in the underlying implementation of any of the data in the Parcel can render older data unreadable." developer.android.com/reference/android/os/Parcel.html – Sam003 Mar 11 '15 at 19:12
  • @Zhisheng what is meant by arbitrary objects? what kind of objects we can put into the Parcel? – hasnain_ahmad Nov 16 '15 at 12:39
  • How about converting objects to json string instead with gson? – F.O.O Sep 10 '16 at 8:51

If you want to be a good citizen, take the extra time to implement Parcelable since it will perform 10 times faster and use less resources.

However, in most cases, the slowness of Serializable won’t be noticeable. Feel free to use it but remember that serialization is an expensive operation so keep it to a minimum.

If you are trying to pass a list with thousands of serialized objects, it is possible that the whole process will take more than a second. It can make transitions or rotation from portrait to lanscape feel very sluggish.

Source to this point: http://www.developerphil.com/parcelable-vs-serializable/

In Parcelable, developers write custom code for marshaling and unmarshaling so it creates less garbage objects in comparison to Serialization. The performance of Parcelable over Serialization dramatically improves (around two times faster), because of this custom implementation.

Serialization is a marker interface, which implies that user cannot marshal the data according to their requirements. In Serialization, a marshaling operation is performed on a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) using the Java reflection API. This helps identify the Java object's member and behavior, but also ends up creating a lot of garbage objects. Due to this, the Serialization process is slow in comparison to Parcelable.

Edit: What is the meaning of marshalling and unmarshalling?

In few words, "marshalling" refers to the process of converting the data or the objects inbto a byte-stream, and "unmarshalling" is the reverse process of converting the byte-stream beack to their original data or object. The conversion is achieved through "serialization".

http://www.jguru.com/faq/view.jsp?EID=560072

  • Pretty good explanation even without a verbose example. Just what I needed for revision. – sud007 Dec 12 '17 at 6:03

Parcelable vs Serializable I refer these two.

Serializable, the Simplicity

What is Serializable?

Serializable is a standard Java interface. It is not a part of the Android SDK. Its simplicity is its beauty. Just by implementing this interface your POJO will be ready to jump from one Activity to another.

public class TestModel implements Serializable {

String name;

public TestModel(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}
}
  • The beauty of serializable is that you only need to implement the Serializable interface on a class and its children. It is a marker interface, meaning that there is no method to implement, Java will simply do its best effort to serialize it efficiently.

  • The problem with this approach is that reflection is used and it is a slow process. This mechanism also tends to create a lot of temporary objects and cause quite a bit of garbage collection.

Parcelable, The Speed

What is Parcelable?

Parcelable is another interface. Despite its rival (Serializable in case you forgot), it is a part of the Android SDK. Now, Parcelable was specifically designed in such a way that there is no reflection when using it. That is because we are being really explicit for the serialization process.

public class TestModel implements Parcelable {


String name;

public TestModel(String name, String id) {
    this.name = name;
}

protected TestModel(Parcel in) {
    this.name = in.readString();


}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

@Override
public int describeContents() {
    return 0;
}

@Override
public void writeToParcel(Parcel dest, int flags) {
    dest.writeString(this.name);

}

public static final Parcelable.Creator<TestModel> CREATOR = new Parcelable.Creator<TestModel>() {
    @Override
    public TestModel createFromParcel(Parcel source) {
        return new TestModel(source);
    }

    @Override
    public TestModel[] newArray(int size) {
        return new TestModel[size];
    }
};
}

Now, The winner is

enter image description here

The results of the tests conducted by Philippe Breault show that Parcelable is more than 10x faster than Serializable. Some other Google engineers stand behind this statement as well.

According to them, the default Serializable approach is slower than Parcelable. And here we have an agreement between the two parties! BUT, it is unfair to compare these two at all! Because with Parcelable we are actually writing custom code. Code specifically created for that one POJO. Thus, no garbage is created and the results are better. But with the default Serializable approach, we rely on the automatic serialization process of Java. The process is apparently not custom at all and creates lots of garbage! Thus, the worse results.

Stop Stop!!!!, Before making decision

Now, there is another approach. The whole automatic process behind Serializable can be replaced by custom code which uses writeObject() & readObject() methods. These methods are specific. If we want to rely on the Serializable approach in combination with custom serialization behavior, then we must include these two methods with the same exact signature as the one below:

 private void writeObject(java.io.ObjectOutputStream out)
 throws IOException;

 private void readObject(java.io.ObjectInputStream in)
     throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException;

 private void readObjectNoData()
     throws ObjectStreamException;

And now a comparison between Parcelable and custom Serializable seems fair! The results may be surprising! The custom Serializable approach is more than 3x faster for writes and 1.6x faster for reads than Parcelable.

  • 1
    I enjoyed Reading it.. Thanks – Deep Dave Nov 28 at 2:58

I'm actually going to be the one guy advocating for the Serializable. The speed difference is not so drastic any more since the devices are far better than several years ago and also there are other, more subtle differences. See my blog post on the issue for more info.

  • 1
    Thank you for the share. Its less complex to implement serializeable and the trade off needs to be decided in those rare and hyper optimization cases. – Ankan-Zerob Jul 1 '15 at 17:32
  • 2
    The alternative viewpoint, especially when backed with experiments and results, is very helpful. I have to work with a lot of existing Parcelable based source code, and may refactor some of it now that I've read your blog post. – Les Mar 23 '17 at 11:49

1. Serializable

@see http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/Serializable.html

Interface of what?

  • is a standard Java interface

Speed

  • slower than Parcelable

2. Parcelable

@see http://developer.android.com/reference/android/os/Parcelable.html

Interface of what?

  • is android.os interface
    • which means Google developped Parcelable for better performance on android

Speed

  • faster ( because it is optimized for usage on android development)

> In Conclusion

Be aware that Serializable is a standard Java interface, and Parcelable is for Android Development

  • You should add the uses of them too. – Anshul Tyagi Nov 16 '16 at 7:30

There is some performance issue regarding to marshaling and unmarshaling. Parcelable is twice faster than Serializable.

Please go through the following link:

http://www.3pillarglobal.com/insights/parcelable-vs-java-serialization-in-android-app-development

Implementation of parcelable can be faster if you use paracelable plugin in android studio. search for Android Parcelable code generator

The Serializable interface can be used the same way as the Parcelable one, resulting in (not much) better performances. Just overwrite those two methods to handle manual marshalling and unmarshalling process:

private void writeObject(java.io.ObjectOutputStream out)
    throws IOException
private void readObject(java.io.ObjectInputStream in)
    throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException

Still, it seems to me that when developing native Android, using the Android api is the way to go.

See :

you can use the serializable objects in the intents but at the time of making serialize a Parcelable object it can give a serious exception like NotSerializableException. Is it not recommended using serializable with Parcelable . So it is better to extends Parcelable with the object that you want to use with bundle and intents. As this Parcelable is android specific so it doesn't have any side effects. :)

Parcelable much faster than serializable with Binder, because serializable use reflection and cause many GC. Parcelable is design to optimize to pass object.

Here's link to reference. http://www.developerphil.com/parcelable-vs-serializable/

Parcelable is sort of a standard in Android development

Parcelable is recommended approach for data transfers. But if you use serializable correctly as shown in this repo, you will see that serializable is sometimes even faster then parcelable. Or at least timings are comparable.

Is Parcelable faster then Serializable?

Usual Java serialization on an average Android device (if done right *) is about 3.6 times faster than Parcelable for writes and about 1.6 times faster for reads. Also it proves that Java Serialization (if done right) is fast storage mechanism that gives acceptable results even with relatively large object graphs of 11000 objects with 10 fields each.

  • The sidenote is that usually everybody who blindly states that "Parcelable is mush faster" compares it to default automatic serialization, which uses much reflection inside. This is unfair comparison, because Parcelable uses manual (and very complicated) procedure of writing data to the stream. What is usually not mentioned is that standard Java Serializable according to the docs can also be done in a manual way, using writeObject() and readObject() methods. For more info see JavaDocs. This is how it should be done for the best performance.

So, if serializable is faster and easier to implement, why android has parcelable at all?

The reason is native code. Parcelable is created not just for interprocess communication. It also can be used for intercode communication. You can send and recieve objects from C++ native layer. That's it.

What should you choose? Both will work good. But I think that Parcelable is better choice since it is recommended by google and as you can see from this thread is much more appreciated.

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