148

I want to create a program that will simulate an out-of-memory (OOM) situation on a Unix server. I created this super-simple memory eater:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

unsigned long long memory_to_eat = 1024 * 50000;
size_t eaten_memory = 0;
void *memory = NULL;

int eat_kilobyte()
{
    memory = realloc(memory, (eaten_memory * 1024) + 1024);
    if (memory == NULL)
    {
        // realloc failed here - we probably can't allocate more memory for whatever reason
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        eaten_memory++;
        return 0;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    printf("I will try to eat %i kb of ram\n", memory_to_eat);
    int megabyte = 0;
    while (memory_to_eat > 0)
    {
        memory_to_eat--;
        if (eat_kilobyte())
        {
            printf("Failed to allocate more memory! Stucked at %i kb :(\n", eaten_memory);
            return 200;
        }
        if (megabyte++ >= 1024)
        {
            printf("Eaten 1 MB of ram\n");
            megabyte = 0;
        }
    }
    printf("Successfully eaten requested memory!\n");
    free(memory);
    return 0;
}

It eats as much memory as defined in memory_to_eat which now is exactly 50 GB of RAM. It allocates memory by 1 MB and prints exactly the point where it fails to allocate more, so that I know which maximum value it managed to eat.

The problem is that it works. Even on a system with 1 GB of physical memory.

When I check top I see that the process eats 50 GB of virtual memory and only less than 1 MB of resident memory. Is there a way to create a memory eater that really does consume it?

System specifications: Linux kernel 3.16 (Debian) most likely with overcommit enabled (not sure how to check it out) with no swap and virtualized.

  • 16
    maybe you have to actually use this memory (i.e. write to it)? – m.s. Oct 20 '15 at 10:26
  • 4
    I don't think compiler optimizes it, if that was true, it wouldn't allocate 50GB of virtual memory. – Petr Oct 20 '15 at 10:28
  • 18
    @Magisch I don't think it's the compiler but the OS like copy-on-write. – cadaniluk Oct 20 '15 at 10:28
  • 4
    You are right, I tried to write to it and I just nuked my virtual box... – Petr Oct 20 '15 at 10:34
  • 4
    The original program will behave as you expected if you do sysctl -w vm.overcommit_memory=2 as root; see mjmwired.net/kernel/Documentation/vm/overcommit-accounting . Note that this may have other consequences; in particular, very large programs (e.g. your web browser) may fail to spawn helper programs (e.g. the PDF reader). – zwol Oct 20 '15 at 12:44
219

When your malloc() implementation requests memory from the system kernel (via an sbrk() or mmap() system call), the kernel only makes a note that you have requested the memory and where it is to be placed within your address space. It does not actually map those pages yet.

When the process subsequently accesses memory within the new region, the hardware recognizes a segmentation fault and alerts the kernel to the condition. The kernel then looks up the page in its own data structures, and finds that you should have a zero page there, so it maps in a zero page (possibly first evicting a page from page-cache) and returns from the interrupt. Your process does not realize that any of this happened, the kernels operation is perfectly transparent (except for the short delay while the kernel does its work).

This optimization allows the system call to return very quickly, and, most importantly, it avoids any resources to be committed to your process when the mapping is made. This allows processes to reserve rather large buffers that they never need under normal circumstances, without fear of gobbling up too much memory.


So, if you want to program a memory eater, you absolutely have to actually do something with the memory you allocate. For this, you only need to add a single line to your code:

int eat_kilobyte()
{
    if (memory == NULL)
        memory = malloc(1024);
    else
        memory = realloc(memory, (eaten_memory * 1024) + 1024);
    if (memory == NULL)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        //Force the kernel to map the containing memory page.
        ((char*)memory)[1024*eaten_memory] = 42;

        eaten_memory++;
        return 0;
    }
}

Note that it is perfectly sufficient to write to a single byte within each page (which contains 4096 bytes on X86). That's because all memory allocation from the kernel to a process is done at memory page granularity, which is, in turn, because of the hardware that does not allow paging at smaller granularities.

  • 5
    It's also possible to commit memory with mmap and MAP_POPULATE (though note that the man page says "MAP_POPULATE is supported for private mappings only since Linux 2.6.23"). – Toby Speight Oct 20 '15 at 18:07
  • 1
    That's basically right, but I think the pages are all copy-on-write mapped to a zeroed page, rather than not present at all in the page-tables. This is why you have to write, not just read, every page. Also, another way to use up physical memory is to lock the pages. e.g. call mlockall(MCL_FUTURE). (This requires root, because ulimit -l is only 64kiB for user accounts on a default install of Debian/Ubuntu.) I just tried it on Linux 3.19 with the default sysctl vm/overcommit_memory = 0, and locked pages use up swap / physical RAM. – Peter Cordes Oct 21 '15 at 4:00
  • 2
    @cad While the X86-64 supports two larger page sizes (2 MiB and 1 GiB), they are still treated quite special by the linux kernel. For instance, they are only used on explicit request, and only if the system has been configured to allow them. Also, the 4 kiB page still remains the granularity at which memory may be mapped. That's why I don't think that mentioning huge pages adds anything to the answer. – cmaster Oct 21 '15 at 7:19
  • 1
    @AlecTeal Yes, it does. That's why, at least on linux, it's more likely that a process that consumes too much memory is shot by the out-of-memory-killer than that one of it's malloc() calls returns null. That's clearly the downside of this approach to memory management. However, it is already the existence of copy-on-write-mappings (think dynamic libraries and fork()) that make it impossible for the kernel to know how much memory will actually be needed. So, if it didn't overcommit memory, you would run out of mapable memory long before you were actually using all the physical memory. – cmaster Oct 21 '15 at 23:39
  • 2
    @BillBarth To the hardware there is no difference between what you would call a page fault and a segfault. The hardware only sees an access that violates the access restrictions laid down in the page tables, and signals that condition to the kernel via a segmentation fault. It's only the software side that then decides whether the segmentation fault should be handled by supplying a page (updating the page tables), or whether a SIGSEGV signal should be delivered to the process. – cmaster Oct 22 '15 at 1:53
26

All the virtual pages start out copy-on-write mapped to the same zeroed physical page. To use up physical pages, you can dirty them by writing something to each virtual page.

If running as root, you can use mlock(2) or mlockall(2) to have the kernel wire up the pages when they're allocated, without having to dirty them. (normal non-root users have a ulimit -l of only 64kiB.)

As many others suggested, it seems that the Linux kernel doesn't really allocate the memory unless you write to it

An improved version of the code, which does what the OP was wanting:

This also fixes the printf format string mismatches with the types of memory_to_eat and eaten_memory, using %zi to print size_t integers. The memory size to eat, in kiB, can optionally be specified as a command line arg.

The messy design using global variables, and growing by 1k instead of 4k pages, is unchanged.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

size_t memory_to_eat = 1024 * 50000;
size_t eaten_memory = 0;
char *memory = NULL;

void write_kilobyte(char *pointer, size_t offset)
{
    int size = 0;
    while (size < 1024)
    {   // writing one byte per page is enough, this is overkill
        pointer[offset + (size_t) size++] = 1;
    }
}

int eat_kilobyte()
{
    if (memory == NULL)
    {
        memory = malloc(1024);
    } else
    {
        memory = realloc(memory, (eaten_memory * 1024) + 1024);
    }
    if (memory == NULL)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        write_kilobyte(memory, eaten_memory * 1024);
        eaten_memory++;
        return 0;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc >= 2)
        memory_to_eat = atoll(argv[1]);

    printf("I will try to eat %zi kb of ram\n", memory_to_eat);
    int megabyte = 0;
    int megabytes = 0;
    while (memory_to_eat-- > 0)
    {
        if (eat_kilobyte())
        {
            printf("Failed to allocate more memory at %zi kb :(\n", eaten_memory);
            return 200;
        }
        if (megabyte++ >= 1024)
        {
            megabytes++;
            printf("Eaten %i  MB of ram\n", megabytes);
            megabyte = 0;
        }
    }
    printf("Successfully eaten requested memory!\n");
    free(memory);
    return 0;
}
  • Yes you are right, it was the reason, not sure about technical background though, but it makes sense. It's weird though, that it allows me to allocate more memory than I can actually use. – Petr Oct 20 '15 at 10:44
  • I do think on OS level the memory is only really used when you write into it, which makes sense considering the OS doesnt keep tabs on all the memory you theorethically have, but only on that which you actually use. – Magisch Oct 20 '15 at 10:45
  • @Petr mind If I mark my answer as community wiki and you edit in your code for future user readability? – Magisch Oct 20 '15 at 10:46
  • @Petr It's not weird at all. That's how memory management on today's OSes works. A major trait of processes is that they have distinct address spaces, which is accomplished by providing each of them a virtual address space. x86-64 supports 48-bits for one virtual address, with even 1GB pages, so, in theory, some Terabytes of memory per process are possible. Andrew Tanenbaum has written some great books about OSes. If you're interested, read them! – cadaniluk Oct 20 '15 at 10:47
  • 1
    I wouldn't use wording "obvious memory leak" I don't believe that overcommit or this technology of "memory copy on write" was invented to deal with memory leaks at all. – Petr Oct 20 '15 at 10:58
13

A sensible optimisation is being made here. The runtime does not actually acquire the memory until you use it.

A simple memcpy will be sufficient to circumvent this optimisation. (You might find that calloc still optimises out the memory allocation until the point of use.)

  • 2
    Are you sure? I think if his allocation amount reaches the max of virtual memory available the malloc would fail, no matter what. How would malloc() know that nobody is going to use the memory?? It can't, so it must call sbrk() or whatever the equivalent in his OS is. – Peter A. Schneider Oct 20 '15 at 10:33
  • 1
    I'm pretty sure. (malloc doesn't know but the runtime certainly would). It's trivial to test (although not easy for me right now: I'm on a train). – Bathsheba Oct 20 '15 at 10:36
  • @Bathsheba Would writing one byte to each page also suffice? Assuming malloc allocates on page boundaries what seems pretty likely to me. – cadaniluk Oct 20 '15 at 10:38
  • 2
    @doron there's no compiler involved here. It's Linux kernel behavior. – el.pescado Oct 20 '15 at 10:53
  • 1
    I think glibc calloc takes advantage of mmap(MAP_ANONYMOUS) giving zeroed pages, so it doesn't duplicate the kernel's page-zeroing work. – Peter Cordes Oct 21 '15 at 4:03
6

Not sure about this one but the only explanation that I can things of is that linux is a copy-on-write operating system. When one calls fork the both processes point to the same physically memory. The memory is only copied once one process actually WRITES to the memory.

I think here, the actual physical memory is only allocated when one tries to write something to it. Calling sbrk or mmap may well only update the kernel's memory book-keep. The actual RAM may only be allocated when we actually try to access the memory.

  • fork has nothing to do with this. You'd see the same behaviour if you booted Linux with this program as /sbin/init. (i.e. PID 1, the first user-mode process). You had the right general idea with copy-on-write, though: Until you dirty them, newly-allocated pages are all copy-on-write mapped to the same zeroed page. – Peter Cordes Oct 21 '15 at 4:05
  • knowing about fork allowed me to make the guess. – doron Oct 21 '15 at 17:57

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